How Many Feet Deep Do You Have To Put A Septic Tank? (Perfect answer)

The general rule of thumb is that most septic tanks can be buried anywhere from four inches to four feet underground.

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  • How deep do you need to bury a septic tank? between 4 inches and 4 feet In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground.

How deep should septic tank be buried?

In most cases, septic tank components including the lid, are buried between 4 inches and 4 feet underground. You can use a metal probe to locate its edges and mark the perimeter. If you do not find the lid by probing, shallow excavation with a shovel along the tank’s perimeter should reveal the lid.

How big of a septic tank do I need for a 2 bedroom house?

The recommendation for home use is a 1000 gallon septic tank as a starting point. The 1000 gallon size tank is a minimum and *can be suitable for a 2 bedroom, 3 bedroom house. Some recommendations say to add an extra 250 gallons of septic tank capacity for each bedroom over 3 bedrooms.

What is the smallest septic tank you can buy?

If you’re looking to install a septic system, the smallest tank size you’re likely to find is 750-gallon, which will accommodate one to two bedrooms. You can also opt for a 1,000-gallon system, which will handle two to four bedrooms.

How deep are drain fields buried?

A typical drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36 inches.

How many lids are on a septic tank?

In order to make repairs or perform regular maintenance or cleaning/pumping of the tank, access must be provided. There are usually two lids located at the top of the septic tank-one located over the inlet “T” and one located over the outlet “T” (see “Septic Components: Septic Tanks”).

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

Can a septic tank be too big?

A septic tank that is too big will not run well without the proper volume of wastewater running through it. If your septic tank is too big for your house, there wouldn’t be sufficient collected liquid required to produce the bacteria, which helps break down the solid waste in the septic tank.

How do I calculate the size of my septic drain field?

Drainfield Size

  1. The size of the drainfield is based on the number of bedrooms and soil characteristics, and is given as square feet.
  2. For example, the minimum required for a three bedroom house with a mid range percolation rate of 25 minutes per inch is 750 square feet.

How much does it cost to pump a septic tank?

How much does it cost to pump out a septic tank? The average cost is $300, but can run up to $500, depending on your location. The tank should be pumped out every three to five years.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

How big is a typical septic drain field?

A typical septic drainfield trench is 18 to 30 inches in depth, with a maximum soil cover over the disposal field of 36″; or per the USDA, 2 feet to 5 feet in depth.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

Septic Tank Design Depth – how deep should the septic tank be located

  • A septic system inspection can be performed by your local health department, which can also give a list of licensed septic pumpers and, if available, certify you to conduct your own septic system inspection. For homes, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides information on appropriate septic maintenance in the form of booklets and fact sheets. In many parts of Washington, the Clean Water Loan program from Craft3 is available to help with septic system replacement.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Design depth for a septic tank: What are the most frequent depths to which septic tanks, cesspools, seepage pits, and drywells are buried? Is it necessary to locate the septic tank below the frost line in order to prevent it from freezing? Septic tanks are placed at a certain depth, and there are various elements that impact the actual depth to which a septic tank (or cesspool, drywell, or soak-pit) will be sunk, which are discussed below.

For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page.

Septic Tank Installation Depth

Table of Contents for the Article Series

  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH- this article
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION

How Deep Should WePutthe Septic Tank at Original Installation?

Septic tanks may be built almost anywhere in the soil, regardless of its depth. When operating in a freezing climate, even in uninhabited homes, it is unlikely that the septic tank serving an occupied home or even an unoccupied one will freeze. This is due in part to latent heat received by the septic tank’s bottom from earth, in part to heat generated by bacteria in the septic tank, and in part to warm wastewater entering from a building served by the septic system, and in part to warm wastewater entering from the building served by the septic system.

You’ll kill the bacteria, damage the drainfield, and taint the surrounding ecosystem as a result of this.

Factors Determining Septic Tank Depth

The following are the primary elements that influence the actual depth at which a septic tank is likely to be buried (and, consequently, the depth to which you may have to dig to locate the septic tank) at a specific site:

  • The depth to which the lowest sewage line departs the structure that the septic tank serves is referred to as the sewer line depth. Given that we often rely on gravity to transport sewage from a building to a septic tank, the tank will be lower than the waste line that exits the building that it serves. a spot where the contractor discovered site characteristics suited for burying a septic tank because of its form, rocks, and impediments If a location has bedrock or huge rocks that are near to the surface, the tank may be relocated
  • The greater the distance between the tank and the structure, and the greater the depth of the tank if the system relies on gravity to carry sewage, the deeper the tank will be. We don’t place septic tanks any deeper than they need to be since we are normally transporting effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield by gravity as well as by pumping it out. Plumbers often build sewage lines to slope down from the inlet to the outlet at a rate of 1/8″ per foot to 1/4″ per foot of linear run of the waste pipe, depending on the kind of waste pipe. In order to avoid septic drainfield burial at an excessive depth, we must ensure that there is sufficient air in the soil, since the absence of oxygen deep in the soil will inhibit certain desired bacterial action (the aerobic bacteria) that is required to break down and process sewage. It is certainly possible to locate and position the septic tank anywhere, including uphill from the building, if a sewer ejector pump or grinder pump system is utilized to transport sewage from a structure to an underground storage tank. If a sewage effluent pump is used to transport septic effluent from the septic tank to the drainfield, we may, of course, locate the tank “downhill” from the drainfield as well
  • But, if a sewage effluent pump is not utilized, we cannot. Growing grass: If the septic tank is just 2 or 3 inches below the surface of the earth, you might as well have left the top of the tank visible, because grass will not grow in such thin soil as you would expect. Adding 6″ to 12″ of backfill may be sufficient to allow grass to grow over the septic system
  • However, this is a purely aesthetic issue and does not affect the system’s functionality. See SEPTIC SYSTEMS, OVERHAULED PLANTS
  • Recommendations from the manufacturer: Some modern septic treatment system designs need the use of a skilled system operator to perform highly specified inspection and maintenance intervals. According to the information provided atBAT MEDIA SEPTIC PLANTS, BAT septic systems (biologically accelerated treatment) are maintained or examined at 6-month intervals, among other things. According to the maker of that technology (Jet Inc.), it is extremely critical that the finishing grade slope away from the facility when completed. In addition, the grade must be at least 1″ below the bottom of the access covers to be considered. (Jet retired in 2016)

A service riser should be put in deep septic tanks to provide access to the tank. Plungers are large-diameter “wells” that are installed over the entrance and/or outlet ports of a septic tank in order to provide simple access for tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. Plungers are also used for septic tank pumping, inspection, and baffle repair. If the septic tank is sunk more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, good practice calls for the installation of a septic riser, which is a high diameter pipe that allows for easy access to the septic tank for inspection and cleaning.

Continue reading atSEPTIC TANK DEPTH to learn how to determine the depth of a septic tank’s cover, or choose a topic from the closely-related articles listed below, or see the completeARTICLE INDEX for more information.

Alternatively, view the FAQs on SEPTIC TANK DESIGN DEPTH – questions and answers that were originally posted on this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Septic Tank Articles

  • The following topics are covered: SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION LEVELS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • SEPTIC
  • The following topics are covered: SEPTIC DRAINFIELD LOCATION
  • SEPTIC DRAINFIELD SIZE
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM INSPECTION LEVELS
  • SEPTIC TANK COVERS
  • SEPTIC TANK DESIGN STRENGTH SPECS
  • SEPTIC TANKDRAINFIELDFREEZE PROTECTION
  • SEPTIC TANK, HOW TO FIND
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING PROCEDURE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK PUMPING SCHEDULE
  • THE SEPTIC TANK RISERS
  • THE U.S. SEPTIC AUTHORITIESDESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
  • THE MISTAKES MADE IN SEPTIC TANK PUMPING

Suggested citation for this web page

DEPTH AT INSPECTION OF SEPTIC TANK DESIGN An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to SEPTIC SYSTEMS

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How Deep Are Septic Tanks Buried? (And How Do You Find It?)

It is possible that this content contains affiliate links. It is possible that I will receive a commission if you make a purchase after clicking on an affiliate link. In addition, as an Amazon Associate, I receive a commission from qualifying purchases.- Septic tanks, for example, might become a requirement in more remote places where some services are not readily available or easily accessible. After all, we rely on contemporary conveniences such as adequate plumbing to make our lives more comfortable and easy.

Discovering the location of your septic tank in your yard, as well as what may be grown near or on top of it, will help you determine how much of your yard is suitable for regular gardening.

You May Not Know

Despite the fact that it appears to be something that every homeowner should be aware of, understanding how deep a septic tank is buried can be difficult to determine. Perhaps you forgot about the septic tank after it was installed years ago, or perhaps you are moving into a house that already has a septic tank constructed in previously. Whatever the situation, determining the depth of your septic tank can be a challenging task under the circumstances, especially if you are unsure of the location of the lids.

How to Locate Your Septic Tank

Perhaps you’re unsure of the location of your septic tank on your property and are attempting to identify it on your own. There are really quite a few quick and simple methods for determining the location of your tank without having to go through a lengthy process. The first method is to follow the path laid out by your sewer lines. Typically, the tank and your drain field will be placed along a line parallel to the sewage line that goes from your property out to the street. Your home’s crawl area or basement may even have a four-inch sewage line that leads away from the structure of the building.

  • Follow the pipe all the way across the yard, checking every few of feet to make sure you’re still on the right track, and then turn around.
  • When you don’t feel like digging around in your yard, you can always look up your house’s address in the county records database.
  • Diagrams with measurements and even the particular location of where the septic tank is located should be included in this document.
  • You can also choose to dig your lid out from under it.
  • This is what will tell you how many lids are on your septic tank and how many are missing.
  • The majority of septic tanks are rectangular in shape and measure around in the neighborhood of 5′ x 8′ in size.
  • If you are unable to determine the position of your septic tank using a probe, you will need to do a shallow excavation around the perimeter of the tank using a shovel in order to finally locate the lid.
  • First, look for visual cues to help you.
  • There is no doubt about it, this will tell you exactly where the tank is located beneath.
  • Take a look at the plumbing in your structure, as well as the overall state of the property, to get a good sense of where the tank is situated.

It will be full to just a few inches below the underside of your tank lid when your tank is fully charged to its regular level of filling capacity. If the lid is constructed of plastic, fiberglass, or steel, the upper surface of the lid may have some variation in color or texture.

Where Should the Septic Tank Be Located?

If your property does not presently have a septic tank, but you are interested in the possibility of installing one, it is critical that you understand where it should be installed. Ordinarily speaking, most septic tanks will be situated between 10 and 25 feet away from the house. You should bear in mind that septic tanks cannot and should not be located any closer than five feet from your residence. Using a probe, you may search for flat concrete to determine whether or not a tank has previously been put on a property that you have recently purchased.

Planting Above a Septic Tank

Even though it may not appear to be the finest idea in the world, putting vegetation over a septic tank may really be perfectly acceptable as long as you choose the appropriate plants to grow. Not only is it perfectly OK to do so, but it may also be rather helpful depending on what you are planting and harvesting. It is possible to avoid erosion in your tank with the correct sort of vegetation, and it is even possible to absorb some of the additional moisture that might accumulate in your drain field.

  • Perennial plants and grasses (as previously indicated) are the ideal kind of plants to use in and around your drain field and septic tank.
  • You can use non-woody ground covers for a similar purpose as you do with woody ground covers.
  • Take, for example, the expanding environment.
  • If you don’t have access to enough sunshine, you might want to choose a shade garden plant instead.
  • Keep in mind that the soil that surrounds the septic tank drain field will typically be wetter than the surrounding soil in the rest of the yard.
  • As a result, choose a perennial such as a hollyhock, wild violet, or bee balm to ensure that you cover all of those bases when planting.
  • A septic system beneath these plants does not imply that deer will avoid the area because of its presence on your property.
  • Something like a spring bulb or an attractive grass that the deer aren’t generally interested in eating.
See also:  How Far Must A Septic Tank Be From The House Tennessee? (Solution found)

Plants That You Don’t Want to Grow

Just because you have the option of planting over your septic tank does not mean that everything is appropriate for this situation. A few plants should be avoided at all costs while landscaping around your septic tank, particularly huge trees that are known for their rapid growth. On the same vein, shrubs and trees with aggressive root systems are some of the worst plants to grow around your home. These roots will shoot out in quest of water, and they will not be concerned with where they locate it.

The infiltration of those roots into your septic drain field might result in catastrophic damage to your septic tank and drain field.

It’s possible that you’ll need a complete replacement.

Many other plants have strong root systems that you should avoid growing anywhere near your septic tank or drain field, and there are lots of them.

How Your Septic System Works

It is possible that understanding how your septic system operates may help you better manage, maintain, and care for it. Aside from that, it is just a large tank buried in the ground that collects your waste (which is true, but still). In remote locations, there may be a deficiency in sewage infrastructure. Because not every rural location is the same, it is not a given that septic systems will be required in your local rural area. The septic tank, in any case, serves as a form of wastewater treatment facility when there are no sewage lines available.

  • The tank is designed to be waterproof, ensuring that your wastewater does not leech into the surrounding environment.
  • Solids sink to the bottom of the container, scum rises to the top of the container, and liquids sit in the center of the three levels described above.
  • The wastewater that is being discharged from your home is the cause of the exit.
  • This liquid is carried out of your home through a pipe and into a bigger portion of your sanitary sewer system.
  • Your drain is typically comprised of a network of perforated PVC pipes that are put underground in trenches to collect water and waste.
  • Because the drains are perforated, the wastewater is allowed to seep out into the crushed gravel or stone, and then eventually into the surrounding soil.
  • The natural evaporation process will then take care of any surplus moisture in the soil, unless you do something to prevent the water from flowing out of the pipes.

How to Plan a Septic Field

The tank is only one component of the whole equation. You’ll also need a drain field to catch all of the liquid waste that will be generated. When you are planting around your septic tank, the drain pipes are the most significant source of worry. Having those aggressive roots infiltrate and ruin your septic drain system is the very last thing you want. When this occurs, it can prevent your septic tank from emptying correctly and potentially cause it to get contaminated by groundwater. According to a solid rule of thumb, the less horticultural labor you have to do in close proximity to your septic tank, the better.

Just remember that they must be planted every year, so keep that in mind while planting them.

The first step is to fill in the septic drain field with earth.

In the second instance, too much mulch is being applied to the area in question. The third issue is that you may be watering your plants more than you should be. All three of these factors can impair the capacity of your drain field to evaporate in a typical manner.

How Deep Should a Septic Leach Field Be?

Photograph courtesy of Valerie Loiseleux/E+/Getty Images.

In This Article

  • Drain Field Operation
  • Drain Field Depth
  • Drain Field Width and Length
  • How the Drain Field Works

It is critical to appropriately size a septic system’s drain or leach field, as an inadequately sized field might result in serious complications. Waste puddles appearing on your lawn are just one of the issues that might arise, therefore it’s crucial to grasp the fundamentals of how a drain field works. Although you are not required to become an expert in septic systems, a little information may go a long way toward ensuring that your drain field is in good operating condition.

Tip

The final depth of a septic system’s drain field is determined by a variety of factors. Drain fields, on the other hand, are typically between 2 and 5 feet deep.

How the Drain Field Works

Solid waste is contained in your septic tank until it is pumped out, which is the final step in the process. The bacteria found in that trash, on the other hand, is far more mobile in nature. As part of the septic process, solid waste is removed from your tank and deposited at the bottom of your tank, while wastewater (together with the bacteria it contains) is discharged from your tank and into your drain field. Once there, the water percolates through the soil and eventually joins the local groundwater supply system.

  1. In the long run, bacteria are eaten by microbes in the soil.
  2. This is a significant project that necessitates the establishment of correct soil conditions, including the selection of the appropriate drain fieldsize and depth.
  3. Typically, a completed bed comprises 12 inches of gravel below the pipe and additional 2 inches of gravel on top of the pipe.
  4. The end product is a drain field that is approximately 3 to 4 feet deep.
  5. This type of circumstance might be caused by underground impediments.
  6. High groundwater tables have the potential to accomplish the same thing, necessitating the installation of a drain field capable of filtering germs at a deeper depth in order to avoid pollution.

Occasionally, this is accomplished by making the drain field shallower, but wider or longer in length. In other cases, a mounded or elevated drain field will be required to prevent flooding.

Drain Field Width and Length

If you have more than one bedroom in your house, your septic system designer will figure out what size drain field you’ll need based on the number of bedrooms you have. In addition, the designer will take into consideration the zoning regulations, soil conditions, and the peculiarities of your lot while designing your home. According to many towns’ regulations, for example, your drain field must be at least a set distance away from your property line. The setbacks from streams, marshes, water supply lines (including local water wells), and other possible barriers are also defined by municipal construction standards.

In addition, pipes are frequently spaced 6 feet apart from one another.

The fact that they are spaced 6 feet apart, on the other hand, provides for the addition of more pipes at a 3-foot spacing if necessary in the future without enlarging the total footprint of the drain field.

It is then decided how this pipe should be laid out in relation to the amount of land available for the leach field to be used.

How Far Should You Put the Septic Tank From the House?

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In This Article

  • Amount of distance from the home
  • Basic safety concerns
  • Suggestions for a successful installation

Distance from the home; basic safety concerns; suggestions for a successful installation; and more.

Tip

Depending on where you live, local ordinances and regulations that specify the distance between the septic tank and the home vary. However, the normal minimum distance is 10 feet between the two structures. Consult your local ordinances and regulations for a detailed answer as to how far your septic tank must be installed from your home. Requirements differ from one location to the next, although the standard minimum distance from the home is 10 feet in most cases. In the case of a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health demand a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some cases.

Basic Safety Considerations

The distance between the septic tank and the home is dictated by local ordinances and regulations, which vary depending on where you live. However, the common minimum distance is ten feet. You should check with your local ordinances and regulations for a particular answer on how far your septic tank must be located from the house. The requirements vary from one location to another, but the standard minimum distance from the home is ten feet in most instances. If you want to use a private well for drinking water, however, keep in mind that many state departments of health mandate a minimum distance of 50 feet between a new septic tank and a well, according to APEC Water & Wastewater.

It is possible that the septic tank will be placed considerably closer to the structure since it will be easier and require less plumbing in some circumstances.

It is ultimately your responsibility as a homeowner to determine where your tank will be installed; thus, keep a careful eye on the issue as your house is being built.

Tips for a Successful Installation

Plan ahead of time to get your water supply switched on prior to installing your septic tank. You must fill the tank with water as soon as it is placed in its final position for this to be possible. This has absolutely nothing to do with the septic system itself, but it is a prudent precaution. In the event of a heavy downpour, the groundwater may swell and a septic tank may float out of the ground, even if it has been buried. If this occurs, contact a qualified professional immediately. Repairing any damage done to the lines or to the tank itself, as well as putting the tank back in its original location, may be a costly and time-consuming endeavor.

Initially, you may be confident that you will remember the exact location of the marker when it is time to top up the tank — which is generally every three to five years — but your memory may fade over time.

How Deep Is A Septic Tank?

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links, which means that if you purchase a product after clicking on one of our links, we may receive a commission or free product from the firms featured in this post. Amazon is a good illustration of this. Septic tanks are tanks that are built below the surface of the ground. The depth of the tank is determined by a variety of elements that are taken into consideration during the tank’s installation. It is vital to know the depth of a septic tank, especially when access is required for pumping or inspection of the tank.

So, how far down does a septic tank go?

They are generally rectangular in design and measure 5 by 8 feet in dimensions.

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When it comes to septic tanks, how deep should they be? Because every condition and location is unique, the depth of a septic tank must be determined based on the specifics of the situation. As a result, before settling on a structure, the designer takes a variety of things into consideration. Assume that the soil type is such that it permits the use of the gravity system to function. Consequently, the septic tank may be built in a convenient location near to the surface. Now, this suggests that the lid can be raised to the level of the grade.

So it allows for the entire effluent to be transported from the septic tank to the distribution section.’ This is the location where they are disseminated.

Depending on the weather conditions, they might be shallower or deeper.

The depth of the drain field is also determined by the level of the tank.

As a result, the top of this septic tank should preferably be directly below grade, with additional soil cover on top. Septic tanks are built substantially deeper in colder climates to accommodate the ice and snow that accumulates.

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This is determined by elements such as the kind of soil and geology in which it is constructed. Another consideration is the depth of the sewer pipe leading out from the property. Similarly, in cold areas, the latent heat from the earth, along with the bacterial activity of the sewage, keeps the water from being frozen. Any septic tank should not be buried too deeply underground, since this might cause harm to it and prevent it from performing its intended purpose. Here are a few examples of such elements that have been well explained:

  • The presence of a high water table makes a deep septic tank an unwise choice in these circumstances. It is possible that extra soil will be required in order to improve absorption. It results in the formation of a mound, which can function as an above-ground drainfield.
  • Type of Soil– The type of soil and the amount of organic matter in the soil influence the depth of the septic tank. High water tables are frequent in clay-rich areas, and they are especially prevalent in the southwestern United States. Professionals can assess the composition of the soil and make recommendations for the depth of the septic tank based on their findings.
  • Site Characteristics– As you plan your system, your contractor will be able to evaluate the characteristics of your property. Drainage patterns, water bodies in the area, and slope are all included in this type of study. They can calculate the optimal depth of the septic tank based on these considerations.
  • Tank Kind– The type of tank also has an impact on its performance. There are several different types of septic tanks available, some of which may contain up to 2 to 3 feet of earth on top. As a result, if the tanks are placed significantly deeper, the manufacturer’s guarantee will be violated.

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A riser should be constructed in septic tanks that are located deep in the ground. Risers are large-diameter tubes that are commonly referred to as ‘wells.’ These are installed directly above the input baffle access point for the septic tank. This is often where the outlet is located. The major reason for installing it is to make it easier for specialists to get to the pump when they arrive to work. Professionals require access to perform services such as baffle repair, inspection, septic tank pumping, cleaning, and other tasks.

This pipe has a big diameter, which allows for convenient access to the tank for pumping and inspection purposes.

How to Find the Septic Tank Lid Deep Below the Surface?

The installation of an aerator in a septic tank that is deep is recommended. Riser are large-diameter pipes that are commonly referred to as ‘wells’ in the industry These are installed directly above the inlet baffle access opening for the septic tank intake baffle. Normally, this is where the outlet is located. In order to guarantee that specialists can easily reach the pump, it is essential that it is installed. Septic tank pumping, cleaning, and other services provided by professionals are necessitated by lack of access.

See also:  How To Properly Abandon A Septic Tank Maricopa County?

For pumping and inspection, this is a large-diameter hose that makes it simple to get into the tank.

  • A riser should be fitted in septic tanks that are installed deep. Risers are large-diameter tubes that are sometimes referred to as ‘wells.’ These are installed just above the input baffle access port for the septic tank. This is normally where the outlet is located. The major reason for installing it is to make it easier for specialists to get to the pump when they arrive. Professionals are required for services such as baffle repair, inspection, septic tank pumping, cleaning, and other related tasks. If the septic system is buried more than a few inches below the surface of the earth, it is a good idea to construct a septic riser. This pipe has a big diameter, which allows for easier access to the tank for pumping and inspection purposes.

Questions Related to How Deep is a Septic Tank

Septic tanks that are built deep should have an ariser fitted. Risers have a considerable diameter and are commonly referred to as ‘wells’. These are installed directly above the septic tank intake baffle access port. Typically, this is where the outlet is located. The major reason for installing it is to make it easier for specialists to get to the pump when they come in. Septic tank pumping, cleaning, and other services provided by professionals are necessitated by the lack of access. In the event that the septic system is buried only a few inches below the surface of the earth, it is recommended that a septic riser be installed.

  • It is important to understand what happens if a septic tank is installed excessively deep.

It is not suggested to put a septic tank at a location that is too deep.

If it is implanted too deeply, it is possible that it will malfunction on a regular basis. It is possible that effluent may backlog on a regular basis and will not naturally flow into the drainfield.

  • Extremely deep septic tank installations are not advised. The likelihood of it malfunctioning on a regular basis is increased if it is put too far down. This means that effluent may backlog on a regular basis and not flow freely through the drainfield.

No, you should never drive over a septic tank, even if you are aware that it is buried deep down. In a short period of time, driving over the tank will damage its surface, causing it to crack, and cause it to stop operating.

  • Anyone who can tell me what the depth of my septic tank is, please.

a person who can tell me how deep is the bottom of my septic tank;

  • How can I find out if there is a problem with my septic tank, which is buried deep underground?

In order to be aware of any problems in the septic tank, which is buried deep, I must first identify them.

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Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation In rural regions of the nation where waste water treatment is not accessible, private on-site wastewater treatment systems (POWTS), also known as septic systems, are utilized largely to treat waste water. Gravity fed/conventional systems are divided into two broad categories: 1. gravity fed/conventional systems and 2. alternative (pump) systems, which include aerobic treatment units (ATUs.) In most cases, electric pumps are used in alternative systems.

However, in many health jurisdictions across the United States, it is still feasible for an individual property owner with heavy equipment operation skills to utilize a backhoe to establish a septic system on their land.

Steps

  1. 1 Make a plan and design for your system. Performing a site survey and conducting a percolation (soil) test on the area where the POWTS is to be placed are both required initial steps in any septic system installation. In order to create a system, it is necessary to first gather information from surveyors and conduct a soil test. It is then possible to submit an application for the necessary permissions and approvals.
  • 1 Organize and plan your system’s components. Performing a site assessment and conducting a percolation (soil) test on the area where the POWTS system is to be placed are two of the initial steps in any septic installation. In order to develop a system, it is necessary to first gather information through surveys and soil tests. Permits and permissions can then be sought for the project, if necessary.
  • Available space
  • Terrain
  • Intended purpose and projected water demand depending on the size of the residence or building that the system will serve
  • Location of the well and/or nearby wells
  • And other factors.
  • Available space
  • Terrain
  • Intended purpose and perceived water demand depending on the size of the dwelling/building that the system will serve
  • Location of the well and/or nearby wells
  • And other factors.
  • The soil type and layering (sand, clay, rock, and where it is placed in relation to depth)
  • The soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  • And the soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  1. The kind and layering of the soil (sand, clay, rock, and where it is placed in relation to depth)
  2. The soil’s ability to drain and filter wastewater
  3. And the soil’s capacity to drain and filter wastewater are all important considerations.

Please keep in mind that the following procedure assumes that the system is being installed for the first time and not as a replacement.

  1. 1 Assemble the equipment and tools that will be used throughout the dig. You will require the following items:
  • Backhoe, laser transit, and grade pole are all included. A 4″ Sch. 40 PVC pipe (and fittings, if necessary)
  • A 4″ ASTM D2729 perforated pipe
  • A 4″ASTM D3034 pipe and fittings
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap
  • PVC primer and adhesive
  • A 4″ Sch. 40 vent cap and test cap The following tools will be required: Saw (either hand saw or cordless reciprocating saw)
  • Hammer drill and bits (for drilling through walls if necessary)
  • The following items are required: hydraulic cement (to seal surrounding pipe if pipe is going through wall)
  • Shovel
  • Stone measuring an inch and a half and cleaned (amount varies depending on system size)
  • Tape measurements (both ordinary and at least a 100-foot-long tape)
  • Septic fabric (cut to 3′ length or less from a roll)
  • Septic tank and risers (concrete or plastic if allowed)
  • Riser sealant such as Con-Seal (for concrete) or silicone caulk (for plastic)
  • A septic filter (such as a Zoeller 170 or similar) if one is necessary
  • A distribution box (either concrete or plastic, if more than two laterals are being run)
  • And a septic tank.
  • 2 Determine the location of the entrance to the building in relation to the location of the septic tank. Make an excavation at least 2 feet deep and drill a hole through the wall, or go deeper and drill a hole beneath the footing, depending on your preference or the need. Because this is precisely what a gravity-fed system is designed to accomplish, expect the flow to continue to flow downhill from here. When transferring waste from the tank to the drain field, it does not employ any mechanical methods other than gravity.
  • The pipe should be 4″ Sch. 40 and should extend at least five feet outside the structure toward the tank, either through the wall or beneath it. Set it level where it will pass through a wall or under a footing, and from there, run it with approximately 1/8″ of pitch (slope) every foot of length toward the septic tank until it reaches the tank. If necessary, go even farther into the tank or all the way into the tank. If this is the case, switch to 4″ 3034 with the appropriate adaptor and pipe 3034 toward the tank.
  • Make sure you use a test cap on the end that will be entering the building. It is recommended that if you are going through a wall, you seal the area around the hole with hydraulic cement both inside and outside
  • Do not run too much pitch out to the tank. If there is an excessive amount, the water will run away quicker than the sediments, resulting in the solids remaining in the pipe. Additionally, depending on the depth of your drain field and how close it will be to the tank’s outflow, there may not be enough pitch to get to the drain field.
  • 3 Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the installation of the concrete aerobic tank below ground. Make use of the laser transit to “shoot” the top of the pipe that leads out to the tank with the laser. The distance between the top of the intake and the bottom of the tank is measured in feet and inches. To the number you fired off the top of the pipe, add this (go up on the grade pole) + 1 1/2″ to get the total. The depth of the grade pole has now been adjusted to the desired depth. Using this, continue to drill the hole to the desired depth
  • 3 Dig a hole large enough to accommodate the installation of the concrete aerobic tank below ground level. To “shot” the top of the pipe that leads to the tank, use the laser transit. The distance between the top of the intake and the bottom of the tank is measured in feet and meters. To the number you fired off the top of the pipe, add this (go up on the grade pole) + 1 1/2″ to get the final result. It is now necessary to adjust the depth of the grade pole. Using this, continue to drill the hole to the necessary depth
  • .
  1. 4Use “inch-and-a-half cleaned drain rock” from a neighboring gravel dump to surround the pipe, which is required in most areas. This is necessary in order to keep the pipe stable. For further information on the size of embedment and gravel required, check with your local health department. Five-inch perforated pipe in a gravity drain field does not have a slope from one end to another and has capped ends
  2. Once you have received a green sticker from the health inspector, you must cover the pipe and tank. All places, subject to the restrictions of the local health authority, will be required to cover the drain rock with a specific filter fabric, newspaper, four inches of straw, or untreated construction paper before backfilling. Advertisement
  1. A pump chamber after the septic tank should be installed The pump chamber, also known as a pressure tank or dosing tank, is where the electric pump is housed, which is responsible for transporting wastewater from one location to another and finally into the drain field for final disposal.
  • Set up the pump chamber in the same manner as you would a septic tank. The effluent pump and floats are housed in the pump chamber, and they are responsible for pumping the effluent out to the drain field at predetermined or scheduled intervals. This is a hermetically sealed system. To ensure that the electrical installation complies with state standards, it is frequently necessary to hire a qualified electrician. It is important to remember that in places with high groundwater, the pump chamber or additional ATUs may remain essentially empty for long periods of time, and that these tanks may need to be safeguarded from floating by the installation of additional weight or other protective features.
  1. Secondly, all construction details, including the layout of all sewers outside of the home, the location and depth of all tanks, the routing and depth of pressurized effluent lines, and other system components, such as the drain field and any additional ATUs, must be consistent with the septic system plans approved by the local county health department. Cover the tank and pressurized lines once the inspector has given his final clearance and the system has been turned on. Advertisement

Create a new question

  • Question I had a tank put, but it isn’t level with the ground. What will be the ramifications of this, and should it be leveled? It is necessary to keep the tank level. It is difficult to predict what it will have an impact on because we do not know which direction it is off level. Question Is it necessary to be concerned about tree roots growing into the drainage area when using a gravity flow kind of tank? Whether or whether you have lateral lines is dependent on the kind of trees that are growing close or above them. Tree species that tend to extend roots into the lateral lines and obstruct them are known as ramifications. Due to the fact that they are buried deep in the ground and surrounded by a pocket of gravel that allows waste water to drain out, they are rarely affected by grass, weeds, and shrubs. Question What is the maximum depth that a pipe may be lowered into the leech bed? The majority of systems require 12 volts “in the form of rock The perforated pipe should be suspended in the top area of the rock
  • It should not be touching the rock. Question Maintaining a lush green grass on or above your pitch is it safe, or is it a good practice? According to what I’ve heard, brown or dead grass is preferred so that your field can breathe more easily. It is necessary for your field to take a breath. The presence of green grass across your field indicates that it is functioning well. With lush grass covering your field, it will be able to breathe. There should be no planting of woody shrubs or trees over the leach field. Question What is the recommended distance between the septic tank and the house/boundary? A minimum of fifty feet is required. States have different laws, but this is the most common distance
  • Nonetheless, other states have stricter laws. Question What is the average amount of soil that goes into a residential leach field? It is dependent on how chilly it becomes. There are no less than 12 in the northern United States “in the leach field’s surface
  • Question Is it possible to build a septic system during the cold months? What you should do will depend on whether or not you reside in a place where the ground freezes. Question What amount of water should I put in the tank to get it going? None. A typical tank holds 1,000 gallons and will fill up quite quickly if used on a regular basis. When liquid effluent is discharged to the drain field, the goal is to catch and pre-treat particles that have accumulated. It is possible that a pump system will require water to prime the pump. Question There is a misalignment between my septic field’s underground line and the pipe on the tank. Is it OK to utilize a 90-degree elbow on my septic tank? As long as you have decent downhill flow, you should be fine. Instead of using a 90, I would use two 45s. Question If I’m installing a septic system, when should I contact an inspector? Immediately following system installation but before earth is used to cover the system in place Always check with the inspector ahead of time to verify that they can satisfy your inspection needs

Question I had a tank put, however it isn’t level with the surrounding ground. So, what will be the ramifications of this, and should the playing field be leveled? It is necessary to ensure that the tank is leveled before using it. Not knowing which direction it is off level makes it difficult to predict what will happen. Question Do I have to be concerned about tree roots coming into the drainage area if I use a gravity flow sort of tank? If there are any trees growing close or above your lateral lines, it will depend on their kind.

  • Due to the fact that they are buried deep and surrounded by a pocket of gravel that allows waste water to drain out, they are rarely harmed by grass, weeds, and shrubs.
  • 12 volts are required by the vast majority of systems “the substance of stone Ideally, the perforated pipe should be hung from the rock’s uppermost part.
  • In order for your field to be able to breathe, brown or dead grass has been suggested.
  • Green grass covering your field allows it to breathe.
  • Question Approximately how far away from the house/boundary should a septic tank be?
  • This is the most frequent distance, however the legislation differs from one state to the next.
  • What you wear will be determined by how chilly it is outside.

It is dependent on whether you live in a place where the ground freezes or not.

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None.

While the liquid effluent is being discharged to the drain field, the particles are being retained and pre-treated.

Question When I go to connect my septic field pipe to the tank, the pipes do not line up.

For as long as the downhill flow is good.

Question A septic system installation requires the services of an inspector at some point.

Always check with the inspector ahead of time to verify that they can fit your inspection schedule.

  • The use of aerobic bacterial additions (which are available at most DIY stores) to maintain a healthy and well functioning system, as suggested by producers on a periodic basis, is contentious. The septic tank is an anaerobic (wet) environment in which the majority of yeasts and other additions will have little or no effect on the sewage being processed. When it comes to installing septic tanks, some old school installers believe that placing an additive, a shovel of muck, or even a dead cat in an empty tank will “start” the process. What naturally enters the tank serves as the only thing that is necessary. The aerobic (wet or dry) component of the system consists of hundreds of square feet of drain field, where additives will do little help even if they make it all the way to the end of the system. The use of chemicals in septic systems has not been the subject of an independent research that has been published in a respectable scientific publication anywhere in the world, including this nation. This will mostly certainly be confirmed by your local health department. Each phase of the building process will almost certainly include an examination by a health inspector before the work can be completed or covered up. On pressurized lines, the use of a sand embedment is recommended in order to reduce the amount of damage caused by moving soil that has a high concentration of clay. When pumps are turned on and off, pressurized lines might move as well. Four inches (10.2 cm) of sand bedding on all four sides of the lines will prevent sharp pebbles from the ground or backfill from wearing holes in the pipe over time
  • And

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  • Keep the perforated pipe for the leech field in a vertical position while installing it to avoid having the holes in the pipe turn downward. It is necessary to lay the perforated drain field pipe ASTM 2729 dead level, so that the printed line on the pipe is facing up. The perforations on both sides of the pipe are on both sides of the pipe. All of the sections of perforated pipe are cemented together, and the ends of each leach line are capped to complete the installation. So, when waste water enters the pipe, it will fill the pipe to the height of the perforations and overflow from ALL of the holes, utilising the whole leach field as a means of treatment. In certain health authorities, you can utilize waste water to water grass or decorative plants, trees, vegetable gardens, and fruit trees if you place the perforated pipe on a slope. However, the water must first be cleaned by the system (tertiary treatment includes disinfection) in order to prevent pathogens (germs) from the septic system from being discharged into the environment throughout the process. Make sure to check with your local health authority to verify if the practice known as “reuse” is permitted in your community.

Keep the perforated pipe for the leech field in a vertical position while installing it to avoid having the holes in the pipe point downward. It is necessary to lay the perforated drain field pipe ASTM 2729 dead level, so that the printed line on the pipe is facing up. The perforations on both sides of the pipe are on the inside of the pipe. A glue joint is used to join all portions of the perforated pipe, and the ends of each leach line are sealed. When waste water enters the pipe in this manner, it will fill the pipe to the height of the perforations and overflow from ALL of the holes, using the whole leach field.

In order to prevent diseases (germs) from the septic system from being discharged into the environment, the water must first be treated by the system (tertiary treatment includes disinfection).

Things You’ll Need

  • When installing the perforated pipe for the leech field, take care not to turn the perforations in the pipe downward. The perforated drain field pipe ASTM 2729 has perforations on both sides of the pipe and must be put dead level with the printed line on the pipe pointing up. All of the parts of the perforated pipe are cemented together, and the ends of each leach line are capped to complete the installation. As a result, when waste water enters the pipe, it will fill the pipe to the height of the perforations and overflow from ALL of the holes, using the whole leach field. In certain health jurisdictions, you can utilize waste water to water grass or decorative plants, trees, vegetable gardens, and fruit trees by placing the perforated pipe at the bottom of a slope. In order to prevent pathogens (germs) from the septic system from being discharged into the environment, the water must first be treated by the system (tertiary treatment, which includes disinfection). Check with your local health department to learn if the practice known as “reuse” is permitted in your region.

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  • Septic systems are used to dispose of waste from homes and buildings. Identifying the location of the septic tank and drainfield
  • What a Septic System Is and How It Works Keeping a Septic System in Good Condition
  • Signs that a septic system is failing include:

Septic systems, also known as on-site wastewater management systems, are installed in a large number of buildings and houses. It is easy to lose sight of septic systems, which operate quietly, gracefully, and efficiently to protect human and environmental health due to their burying location. Septic systems are the norm in rural regions, but they may also be found in a lot of metropolitan places, especially in older buildings. It is critical to understand whether or not your building is on a septic system.

Is Your Home or Building on a Septic System?

It is possible that the solution to this question will not be evident. If a structure looks to be connected to a sewage system, it may instead be connected to a septic system. It is fairly unusual for tenants to be unaware of the final destination of the wastewater generated by their residence. Some of the hints or signs listed below will assist in determining whether the facility is served by a septic system or whether it is supplied by a sewer system:

  • Sewer service will be provided at a cost by the city or municipality. Pay close attention to the water bill to see whether there is a cost labeled “sewer” or “sewer charge” on it. If there is a fee for this service, it is most likely because the facility is connected to a sewage system. Look up and down the street for sewage access ports or manholes, which can be found in any location. If a sewage system runs in front of a property, it is probable that the house is connected to it in some way. Inquire with your neighbors to see if they are connected to a sewer or septic system. The likelihood that your home is on a sewer system is increased if the properties on each side of you are on one as well. Keep in mind, however, that even if a sewage line runs in front of the structure and the nearby residences are connected to a sewer system, your home or building may not be connected to one. If the structure is older than the sewer system, it is possible that it is still on the original septic system. Consult with your local health agency for further information. This agency conducts final inspections of septic systems to ensure that they comply with applicable laws and regulations. There is a possibility that they have an archived record and/or a map of the system and will supply this information upon request

All property owners should be aware of whether or not their property is equipped with an on-site wastewater treatment system. Georgia law mandates that the property owner is responsible for the correct operation of a septic system, as well as any necessary maintenance and repairs.

Locating the Septic Tank and Drainfield

Finding a septic system may be a difficult process. They can be buried anywhere in the yard, including the front, back, and side yards. After a few years, the soil may begin to resemble the surrounding soil, making it impossible to distinguish the system from the surrounding soil. It is possible that in dry weather, the grass will be dryer in the shallow soil over the tank and greener over the drainfield, where the cleansed water will be released, but this is not always the case, especially in hot weather.

  • The contractor who built the house should have presented the initial owner with a map showing the tank and drainfield locations, according to the building code.
  • The installation of the system, as well as any modifications made to it, would have been examined by your local health authority.
  • Unfortunately, if the system is very old, any records related with it may be insufficient or nonexistent, depending on the situation.
  • Look for the point at where the wastewater pipes join together if the building is on a crawlspace or has an unfinished basement.
  • The sewer line that runs through the structure is referred to as the building sewer.
  • To “feel” for the tank, use a piece of re-bar or a similar metal probe.
  • If you use this free service, you may avoid accidentally putting a rod through your gas or water line.

Try to locate the tank after a rainstorm, when the metal probe will be more easily maneuvered through moist dirt.

This should be done with care; extreme caution should be exercised to avoid puncturing the building sewer.

A tank is normally 5 by 8 feet in size, however the dimensions might vary.

Be aware that there may be rocks, pipes, and other debris in the area that “feels” like the tank but is not in fact part of the tank.

However, it is possible to have the lid or access port positioned on a riser in addition to being on the same level as the top of the tank in some cases.

Once the tank has been identified, make a rough drawing of its placement in relation to the house so that it will not be misplaced again!

It may be easier to discover the drainage lines now that the tank has been identified, particularly if the area has been subjected to prolonged periods of drought.

How a Septic System Works

Typical sewage treatment system (figure 1). It is composed of three components (Figure 1): the tank, the drain lines or discharge lines, and the soil treatment area (also known as the soil treatment area) (sometimes called a drainfield or leach field). The size of the tank varies according to the size of the structure. The normal home (three bedrooms, two bathrooms) will often include a 1,000-gallon water storage tank on the premises. Older tanks may only have one chamber, however newer tanks must have two chambers.

  • The tank functions by settling waste and allowing it to be digested by microbes.
  • These layers include the bottom sludge layer, the top scum layer, and a “clear” zone in the center.
  • A typical septic tank is seen in Figure 2.
  • It is fortunate that many of the bacteria involved are found in high concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract.
  • Although the bacteria may break down some of the stuff in the sludge, they are unable to break down all of it, which is why septic tanks must be cleaned out every three to seven years.
  • In addition, when new water is introduced into the septic tank, an equal volume of water is pushed out the discharge lines and onto the drainfield.
  • The water trickles out of the perforated drain pipes, down through a layer of gravel, and into the soil below the surface (Figure 3).
  • A typical drainfield may be found here.
  • Plants, bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and other microorganisms, as well as bigger critters such as mites, earthworms, and insects, flourish in soil.
  • Mineralogical and metallic elements attach to soil particles, allowing them to be removed from the waste water.

Maintaining a Septic System

The most typical reason for a septic system to fail is a lack of proper maintenance. Septic systems that are failing are expensive to repair or replace, and the expense of repairs rests on the shoulders of the property owner (Figure 4). Fortunately, keeping your septic system in good working order and avoiding costly repairs is rather simple. Figure 4. Septic system failure is frequently caused by a lack of proper maintenance. It is in your best interests to be aware of the location of the system, how it operates, and how to maintain it.

  1. You should pump the tank if you aren’t sure when the last time it was pumped.
  2. It is not permissible to drive or park over the tank or drainage field.
  3. No rubbish should be disposed of in the sink or the toilet.
  4. It’s important to remember that garbage disposals enhance the requirement for regular pumping.
  5. When designing a landscape, keep the septic system in mind.
  6. It is also not recommended to consume veggies that have been cultivated above drainfield lines (see Dorn, S.
  7. Ornamental Plantings on Septic Drainfields.

C 1030).

Any water that enters your home through a drain or toilet eventually ends up in your septic system.

Don’t put too much strain on the system by consuming a large amount of water in a short period of time.

Additives should not be used.

Various types of additives are available for purchase as treatment options, cleansers, restorers, rejuvenator and boosters, among other things.

To break up oil and grease and unclog drains, chemical additives are available for purchase.

Pumping out the septic tank is not eliminated or reduced by using one of these systems.

They remain floating in the water and travel into the drainfield, where they may block the pipes. Acids have the potential to damage concrete storage tanks and distribution boxes.

Signs a Septic System is Failing

A failed system manifests itself in the following ways:

  • Sinks and toilets drain at a snail’s pace
  • Plumbing that is backed up
  • The sound of gurgling emanating from the plumbing system House or yard aromas that smell like sewage
  • In the yard, there is wet or squishy dirt
  • Water that is gray in hue that has accumulated
  • An region of the yard where the grass is growing more quickly and is becoming greener
  • Water contaminated by bacteria from a well

If you notice any of these indicators, you should notify your local health department immediately. An environmentalist from the health department can assist in identifying possible hazards. There are also listings of state-certified contractors available from the local health department, who may do repairs. Repairs or alterations to the system must be approved by the health department and examined by an inspector. Keep an eye out for any meetings that may take place between a health department inspector and a contractor to discuss repairs to your system.

  1. Household garbage that has not been properly handled is released into the environment when systems fail.
  2. It has the potential to pollute surrounding wells, groundwater, streams, and other sources of potable water, among other things.
  3. The foul odor emanating from a malfunctioning system can cause property values to plummet.
  4. Briefly stated, broken systems can have an impact on your family, neighbors, community, and the environment.
  5. Septic systems are an effective, attractive, and reasonably priced method of treating and disposing of wastewater.

Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from: CIDWT. 2009. Installation of Wastewater Treatment Systems. Consortium of Institutes for Decentralized Wastewater Treatment. Iowa State University, Midwest Plan Service. Ames, IA.

History of the current status and revisions Published on the 15th of August, 2013. Published on March 28th, 2017 with a full review.

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