How Often Should You Inspect Your Septic Tank? (Solution found)

Inspect Your System If your system is only a septic tank and drainfield, commonly called a gravity system, you need to inspect it at least once every three years. All other types of systems are required to be inspected at least once every year.

How often should you get a septic inspection?

  • But that means homeowners get an inspection only when issues that may signal big trouble arise, such as when the toilet backs up, water takes too long to drain, or there’s an actual septic system leakage. The benefit of doing an inspection every three years is to avoid major problems like these.

How often should a septic tank be serviced?

As a general rule, you should only need to empty your septic tank once every three to five years. That being said, the actual frequency will vary depending on your usage and how many people are living in your home.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

How do I keep my septic system healthy?

Do’s and Don’ts when maintaining your septic system

  1. Regularly inspect and maintain your septic system.
  2. Pump your septic tank as needed.
  3. Keep your septic tank lids closed and secured.
  4. Be water-wise.
  5. Direct water from land and roof drains away from the drainfield.
  6. Landscape with love.
  7. Keep septic tank lids easily accessible.

Do septic tanks need servicing?

Septic tanks should be inspected every 1 to 3 years. Whenever you move into a home with a septic tank, the tank should be pumped and inspected. Septic Tank maintenance is important because continued neglect of a tank may result in system failure or the need for replacement of the soil absorption area.

How often do septic tanks need emptying?

The frequency of a septic tank pump out mainly depends on two factors, being the size of the system, and the number of people living in your household. As a general rule, it is advised that you pump out your septic tank one every 2-5 years.

How do I know when my septic tank needs emptying?

Here are some of the signs for which you should look.

  1. Water puddling above the septic tank. So you noticed a small pool of water but it didn’t rain?
  2. Drains moving slowly. If the drain is moving slowly when you flush the toilet, it could be due to a clog.
  3. Bad smells coming from the septic tank.
  4. The sewer has backed up.

How long do septic tanks last?

A septic system’s lifespan should be anywhere from 15 to 40 years. How long the system lasts depends on a number of factors, including construction material, soil acidity, water table, maintenance practices, and several others.

How do I clean my septic tank naturally?

You can mix about a 1/4 cup of baking soda with 1/2 cup of vinegar and 2 tablespoons lemon to make your own natural cleaning agent. The baking soda will fizz up to help get the dirt and grime in your tub and drains. It’s a great cleaner and your septic system will thank you!

How do I check my septic tanks sludge level?

To measure the sludge layer:

  1. Slowly lower the tube into the septic tank until it touches the bottom of the tank.
  2. As the device is slowly pulled out of the water, the check valve closes capturing a liquid/solid profile of the septic tank water. The thickness of the sludge layer can be measured.

Are long showers bad for septic systems?

Washing frequent, small loads of laundry or taking exceptionally long showers every day is all it takes to overload your septic system with too much water. The primary treatment tank needs time to break up solids before partly-treated water can enter the drain field.

How do I increase bacteria in my septic tank?

Flush a packet of brewer’s dry yeast down one toilet on the bottom floor of your house once a month. The yeast will help add “good” bacteria to your septic tank and break down waste.

Is mouthwash bad for septic tanks?

The septic system is a digestive system, Seagraves said. Chemicals such as bleach, disinfectants and antiseptics, even mouthwash, can kill the bacteria and bring the digestive process to a halt. These should be put down the drain sparingly, if at all.

Who is responsible for maintaining a septic tank?

Homeowners. If you’re an owner-occupier and your property has a septic tank, it’s very straightforward: you are fully responsible for your septic tank. If there are any issues with it, it is up to you to fix them.

Can a septic tank never be pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

How often does a 1000 gallon septic tank need to be pumped?

For example, a 1,000 gallon septic tank, which is used by two people, should be pumped every 5.9 years. If there are eight people using a 1,000-gallon septic tank, it should be pumped every year.

Caring for Your Septic System

If your system consists solely of a septic tank and drainfield, which is referred to as a gravity system, you must examine it at least once every three years, if not more frequently. All other sorts of systems are expected to be examined at least once a year, if not more frequently than that. It’s possible that your local health department has more strict inspection requirements. A septic specialist can perform the examination for you, or if your local health department permits it, you can perform the inspection on your own.

Keeping the solids, also known as sludge, from piling up and getting close to the outflow baffles of the system is critical because particles can stop the pipe leading to the drainfield or, even worse, completely choke the drainfield.

  • A maintenance service provider
  • Learning how to perform your own examination
  • And other options. Inquiring with your local health agency to see if they can examine your system for a lesser fee

Pump Your Tank

When it’s time to pump out your septic tank, do so. Don’t wait until you have an issue before seeking help. Septic tanks should be pumped out every three to five years in a normal residence, according to industry standards. Pumping on a regular basis will help you avoid costly failures such as a clogged drainfield or sewage backing up into your house. Use of the garbage disposal will increase the quantity of solids entering the septic tank, increasing the frequency with which it must be pumped.

  • The number of people in the household. In general, the greater the number of people living in the house, the more frequently you must pump
  • The total amount of wastewater produced. Putting a lot of water down the drain (from inefficient or leaky toilets, washers, showerheads, and sink faucets, for example) causes the tank to be unable to settle entirely, and you may have to pump more frequently. The amount of solids present in wastewater. When garbage disposal and food waste flow down the drain, as well as RV and boat waste put into your system, solids will quickly fill your tank. The size of a septic tank. The larger the tank, the more the capacity it has to handle sediments and water, which may allow for longer periods of time between pumping sessions. Older septic tanks may not be the proper size for your property, especially if your home has been modified and is now significantly larger than before.

Learn how to hire a septic pumper by reading this article.

Use Water Efficiently

Water conservation should be practiced. The greater the amount of wastewater produced, the greater the amount of wastewater that must be treated and disposed of by the soil. By minimizing and balancing your water use, you may extend the life of your drainfield, reduce the likelihood of system failure, and eliminate the need for costly repairs. To lower your water consumption, do the following:

  • Invest in efficient water-saving equipment such as faucet aerators, high-efficiency toilets, showerheads, dishwashers, and washing machines
  • And Fix dripping faucets and dripping plumbing fixtures. It is possible to lose hundreds of gallons each day due to a leaky toilet. Shower for shorter periods of time
  • Bathe in a tub that is only partly filled
  • Only wash full loads of dishes and clothes. If your washing machine offers load settings, make sure you choose the appropriate size for the load you’re washing. It is not necessary to use the large-load cycle if you are only washing one or two loads of clothing.

Learn more about water conservation and water recycling by visiting this website.

Toilets Aren’t Trash Cans

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system. Apart from human feces and urine, toilet paper, and soap used for washing, there shouldn’t be much else flushed down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Septic systems are not meant to be used as garbage disposal systems. The only things that should be flushed down your drain are human feces and urine, toilet paper, and soap used for washing. Never flush a toilet if you can help it

Take Care at the Drain

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whatever the sink (kitchen, bathtub, or utility sink), remember to keep your hands clean.

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or into the toilet. Allow it to cool and harden before throwing it away in the garbage
  • It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Septic tanks can become overflowing with food waste from trash disposals, which can clog the drainfield.

It is not required to use septic tank additives found in stores to maintain your septic tank operating correctly, and they do not lessen or remove the need for regular pumping.

Maintain the Area Around Your System

  • Water runoff should be kept away from your system. Drainage systems should be installed to move water away from septic tanks and drainfields. The soil above your system should be somewhat mounding to aid in the discharge of surface water. If heavy rains cause water to pool around your septic system, avoid flushing it down the toilet
  • This will prevent damage to your system. Stay away from your septic tank, drainfield, and drainfield replacement area. Heavy equipment and livestock should not be allowed on your property. The pressure can compress the earth and cause damage to the pipelines and other infrastructure. Before you plant a garden, landscape your yard, build a structure, or install a pool, be sure you know where your septic system is and where it will be replaced. Make sure your system is appropriately landscaped. Grass is the most effective cover. Placement of concrete or plastic over your septic system is not recommended. It is best to plant trees and plants away from your septic tank and drainfield in order to prevent root intrusion into your drainage system. Depending on your needs, an aseptic service specialist might suggest landscaping choices for surrounding your septic system

Keep Records

Keep meticulous records on the operation of your septic system. Understand the location of the system and have a schematic of its layout on hand. Your local health agency may be able to provide you with information on its size and location.

It is also a good idea to keep track of the maintenance performed on the system. These records will be useful if there are any problems with your home, and they will also be beneficial to the next owner of your property.

Don’t Ignore Problems

Minor septic system faults can quickly escalate into major, expensive concerns. When compared to the expense of repairing or replacing a malfunctioning system, which can run into the thousands of dollars, addressing minor faults and paying maintenance costs of a few hundred dollars every few years is a bargain. Don’t ignore the warning signals of a failing septic system.

More Resources

  • Septic System 101 Video
  • Do-It-Yourself Septic System Inspection Video
  • Septic System 101 Video
  • Septic System 101 Video Using the Services of a Septic System Professional
  • Safety of the Septic Tank Lid
  • Symptoms of a Failing Septic System

How Often Should My Septic Tank be Inspected?

  • The failure to perform regular inspections, emptying, and maintenance might result in septic tanks overflowing. The frequency with which you should examine your tank is determined by the size of your family and the size of your tank. An inspection of your septic tank is recommended every two to five years, according to industry experts.

Septic tanks can overflow if they are not properly inspected, emptied, and maintained. Depending on the size of your home as well as the size of your tank, you should examine it on a regular basis. An inspection of your septic tank is recommended every two to five years, according to industry professionals.

Can I Inspect My Septic Tank Myself?

Performing an accurate inspection of your septic tank on your own is practically difficult. This is due to the fact that a thorough examination requires the expertise of a septic service specialist. If you have a septic tank, you may need to have it pumped at the same time as you have it examined in some cases. Consider contacting a local septic tank provider to explore your choices, especially if it has been several years since you last had your septic tank examined and serviced.

See also:  How Many People Will A 500 Gallon Septic Tank Handle? (Correct answer)

How a Septic System Inspection Works

The operation of a septic system is not always clear, especially if you’ve never lived in a house that has one before. Some residences are connected to a centralized sewer system, which transports wastewater to a central treatment plant. This is not a feature available in every property. Septic tanks, which collect wastewater from your house and then distribute it onto a drainage field, are particularly common in rural areas, according to the EPA. Because particles accumulate at the bottom of the septic tank, it must be examined on a regular basis and pumped out every few years at the very least.

It is customary for inspectors to remove the tank lid in order to examine the water level and to ensure that the water is flowing correctly and that there are no leaks in the system.

Routine Septic System Maintenance is Key

Adobe Stock – Cee – stock.adobe.com The proper maintenance of your septic system can assist to extend the life of your system and lessen the chance of unpleasant septic system-related issues. Additionally, you should perform the following maintenance actions to ensure that your septic system is in excellent operating condition, in addition to having it frequently inspected:

  • Be cautious with what you flush down the toilet: Items that are flushed, such as sanitary products or bacon grease, might cause a clog in your septic system. Pay close attention to offensive odors: Even though your septic system is responsible for the difficult task of breaking down household waste, if it is not functioning properly, it can result in some fairly unpleasant odors. Septic system stench may be caused by a variety of factors, including clogged drains, ice accumulation, blocked vents, and a full tank. Pump on a regular basis: In most cases, you’ll need to pump the tank every three to five years, depending on the size of your household and the tank’s capacity.

If you do not do regular maintenance on your septic system, you may find yourself on the hook for a new system sooner rather than later. The cost of a new septic system ranges from around $3,100 to $9,800. The cost of a system is determined by the kind of system and the size of the tank.

How Much Does Septic Tank Pumping Cost?

Pumping a septic tank costs between $290 and $530 on average. Where you reside and the size of your tank have an impact on how much it will cost. You should have your septic tank drained approximately every three to five years, depending on the size of your home and the volume of your tank. On the other hand, an individual who has a 1,000-gallon septic tank may only need to have it pumped every nine to twelve years, but a five-person family with the same-sized tank may only need to have it pumped every two to four years.

Your septic tank may fail and require replacement if it is not pumped and maintained on a consistent basis. During your septic tank inspection, inquire with your contractor about the need for any further maintenance.

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

Toilets aren’t trash cans!

All of the waste that travels down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet or ground up in the garbage disposal, or poured down the sink, shower or bath, ends up in your septic system.

Depending on what goes down the drain, your septic system may or may not function properly.

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • Septic systems are made up of a variety of live organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. In addition to killing these creatures, dumping poisons down the drain might damage your septic system. It makes no difference if you’re standing at the kitchen sink, the bathroom sink, or the laundry sink:

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

undefined

It takes more than merely pumping the system to keep a septic system in good working order. When it comes to checking and maintaining a septic system, there are a range of chores that must be completed to guarantee that the system continues to run smoothly for an extended length of time. Now that you know what is involved in septic system maintenance, you may be wondering how often you should schedule maintenance appointments. This short guide will provide you with a fast summary of what you should know before beginning septic maintenance in Prior Lake, Minnesota.

Inspection and pumping

The average septic system should be examined by a professional at least once every three years, and the tank should be drained at least once every three to five years, according to the EPA. Some sorts of systems, on the other hand, may require more regular maintenance. It is recommended to evaluate septic systems that have pumps, electrical float switches, and other mechanical components on an annual basis. It is also recommended to establish an ongoing maintenance arrangement/service contract with a septic specialist in this situation.

What to expect out of a service appointment

When you bring in a professional to service your septic system, the first thing they will do is meticulously inspect every aspect of the system for leaks, as well as the layers of scum and sludge that have built up inside the tank, before proceeding. It is important to note that the septic tank is equipped with an exit to prevent the scum and sludge from escaping and pouring into the drain field. Inspectors will take measurements that will provide an indication of the type of servicing that is required.

  • During their inspection, your septic service professional will take notes on their measurements, which you should keep for future reference.
  • Aside from taking the measurements necessary to establish whether or not tank pumping is required, your service provider will also make notes regarding any performance issues that arise as well as any repairs that may be required.
  • In addition, they will include remarks on the overall condition of the tank in the service report that they deliver to you.
  • Make sure you maintain all of your septic system’s maintenance documents since they may come in handy in the event of an insurance claim or a house sale.

Please call Mike’s SepticMcKinley Sewer Services immediately if you would like more information about scheduling your septic tank for summertime maintenance in Prior Lake, MN or the regularity with which you should have your system serviced.

How Often Should Septic Tank Be Inspected

Maintaining your home, or perhaps simply purchasing a home that has an existing septic tank, should be included on your list of household maintenance chores to be completed on a regular basis. We recommend that if your home has four or fewer members, you get your septic tank tested every four years at the very least. It is recommended that your tank be examined every two years if you have a family of five or more. Following this timetable will guarantee that you do not experience any serious sewage backups or other frequent septic tank issues.

How Often Should You Pump Your Septic Tank?

In terms of how often your septic tank should be pumped, the recommended time frame is every three to five years. Once again, it is dependent on how much it is used, which is in turn dependent on the number of people living in the home. The importance of following this plan cannot be overstated in order to assist extend the life of your tank as well as to help you prevent the damage and costs that may result from a sewage backup in your house. After all, who wants to be confronted with (and cleaned up after) untreated sewage from their showers, baths, and kitchen sinks?

See also:  Septic Tank Pumped When To Add Treatment?

What Are The Signs That Your Septic Tank Is Full?

It is important to be aware of the following five indicators that your septic tank is overflowing.

  1. There is sewage backup in your yard
  2. Areas of extremely green grass in your yard
  3. Backed-up drainage and sluggish flushing toilets
  4. Sewer aromas
  5. Indicators of standing water

Sewage Backups

When a sewage backlog develops, it is quite simple to pinpoint the source of the problem. The black water in your bathtub, sinks, toilet, and/or shower will be visible (as well as smelling). What it is, and it is a very evident (and typically the most prevalent) symptom that your septic tank is overflowing, can’t be denied. If you live in a multi-level home, you may initially notice this in the drains on the first or second floors of your home. Immediately contact a plumber to have your septic tank checked and emptied if this happens to your system.

Patches Of Very Green Grass In Your Yard

For some reason, you may believe that it is completely natural for the grassy area surrounding your septic tank to be greener and healthier-looking than the remainder of your lawn. However, this is not entirely correct. As a result, if you find that a certain section of your grass is particularly lush, contact to schedule a septic tank inspection as soon as possible. Your tank may have reached its maximum capacity if you see this phenomenon.

Slow Drains and Slow Flushing Toilets

Your drains are also draining very slowly, which is another indication of a clogged septic tank in your home. Of course, it’s possible that there is a blockage someplace in the sewage pipe as well. In general, sewer pipes should be cleaned up every 18 to 22 months, depending on usage. Toilets that flush slowly might also be an indication of a clogged sewage line or a septic tank that has overflowed. If you have been maintaining your septic tank and you believe the problem is a clogged sewer line, you may read another post we made onHow To Fix Sewer Drain Clogs or you can call in a professional plumber to inspect the situation.

Sewer Odors

It’s possible that your septic tank has reached its capacity based on the smell. This is because your septic system does not just collect human waste, but it also gathers water from your shower, washing machine, and dishwasher, so the stink isn’t entirely sewage.

However, the stink is really powerful, and unless you have completely lost your sense of smell, you will be able to notice it as soon as you go outdoors in your backyard.

Standing Water

If you observe any standing water on your property, particularly in the vicinity of the septic tank, it’s another indication that something is wrong, and it’s highly suggested that you contact a plumber to have the septic system inspected and, if necessary, completely emptied.

How Much Does It Cost To Have Septic Tank Inspected?

The cost ranges from $200 to $600, depending on the amount of labor and time required to complete the project. An examination of a septic tank might comprise any of the following components:

  • Septic tank location
  • Excavation
  • Measurement of sludge and scum layers
  • And other tasks. Pumping
  • Visual inspection
  • System testing

How Long Can A Septic Tank Last?

The material used in the construction of a septic tank determines how long it will last in service.

  • Steel tanks have a lifespan of 20 to 30 years
  • Plastic tanks have a lifespan of 30 to 40 years
  • And concrete tanks have a lifespan of 40 years or more.

If you have any questions concerning septic tanks, please contact Atlantis Plumbing at 770-505-8570 right away. We are accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to answer your questions.

We Offer Plumbing Services in Metro Atlanta and Surrounding Areas

Fulton County, Bartow County, Cobb County, Paulding County, Cherokee County, Gwinnett County, and Douglas County are among the counties that make up the metro area. Acworth GA, Atlanta GA, Austell GA, Cartersville GA, Doraville GA, Douglasville GA, Hiram GA, Kennesaw GA, Lawrenceville GA, Lithia Springs GA, Loganville GA, Mableton GA, Powder Springs GA, Rockmart GA, Smyrna GA, Tucker GA, Villa Rica GA, Vinings GA, Woodstock GA, and Surrounding Communities

How Often Should You Have Your Septic Tank Inspected? – A-1 Septic Tank & Drain Service

Septic tank maintenance should be performed on a regular basis in order to avoid costly system breakdowns and backups. The difficulty is that every property is different in terms of capacity and usage, which makes it impossible to develop a uniform set of criteria for suggested septic service intervals on a consistent basis. septic tank and drain cleaning services provided by A-1 Septic TankDrain Service Septic tank cleaning and inspection service in Coldwater, Mississippi, is the area’s most trusted name.

Here are some pointers on how to determine whether it is necessary to get your septic tank inspected:

  • Generally Acceptable Practices: Generally speaking, most septic systems require inspections and pumping every three to five years, depending on their age. Homes with systems that include electrical float switches, trash disposals, pumps, or other mechanical components, on the other hand, should have their systems examined and pumped at least once a year. Keeping accurate records of prior service intervals is a simple approach to figure out when you need servicing and when you don’t. If you are moving into a new house, you should inquire as to how frequently the previous owners’ system required service. Inquire with your septic tank professional about: Keeping track of the sludge layers in your tank is the responsibility of septic specialists. If the sludge layers build up to a level that exceeds the capacity of the septic tank, you may be at risk of having a backup. When you have your tank examined, make sure to inquire about these layers with your service specialist. In order to avoid having your tank pumped, make sure that the top of the scum layer is no more than 12 inches away from the drainfield exit. It is beneficial to monitor these layers every time your system is serviced since it allows you to better schedule inspections in the future
  • Keep an eye out for warning signs of trouble: There are certain clear signals that it is time for an inspection that you should be aware of. If water goes down your drains more slowly than usual, if you notice sewage smells inside or outside your home, if there is pooled water or if the grass above your drainfield is unusually lush, it is likely that you require emergency septic tank pumping.

Maintaining a proactive approach to septic tank inspections ensures that your system remains in peak operating condition. When in doubt, get a professional inspector to come out and go over your system. Septic tank pumping and cleaning are available by calling A-1 Septic TankDrain Service at (662) 895-8950 or visiting their website.

How Often Should You Pump Your Septic Tank?

The most often asked question we receive is “How often should I pump my septic tank?” This is by far the most common question we receive. New homeowners who are unfamiliar with septic systems are frequently required to learn how to properly manage their septic systems in order to avoid costly difficulties in the future. As an alternative to sewer systems and as an ecologically beneficial approach to handle domestic drain waste, a septic system is distinct from a sewer system and requires extra attention and upkeep to function properly.

Septic tank pumping should be done at the right interval for your home

The fact is that, while there are some broad suggestions that a septic system should be pumped every 2-5 years, the truth is that you actually only need to pump your system as frequently as your system requires.

The amount of sludge and scum present in a septic tank is the most important element in determining how often it should be flushed. When your septic system functions, it does so by taking use of the natural force of gravity to break out the household wastewater into three distinct components:

  • Solids (sludge) accumulate at the bottom of the tank
  • Grease (scum) accumulates at the top of the tank
  • And watery mix (effluent) accumulates in the center of the tank.

When the system is operating normally, the sludge and scum remain in the septic tank while the watery mix drains out into the drain field. The sludge and scum in the septic tank, on the other hand, must be removed from time to time in order to keep things running well. Sludge levels that reach dangerous levels, and/or a scum layer that has developed to a significant thickness, will be driven out into the drain field together with the watery effluent, resulting in a clogging of the drain field.

This can result in the growth of harmful germs in your house, as well as the need for a costly repair.

Most homeowners pumping more often than necessary are overspending!

Essentially, by pumping your septic tank too frequently, there is not enough sludge and scum buildup in the tank to ensure that you earn the optimum return on your investment in the costs of pumping your tank. Paying for the service more frequently than you need to is a waste of money that provides no additional benefits, just like paying for any other periodic maintenance. The fact is that your septic system does require a certain number of beneficial bacteria to function properly. Septic tanks employ anaerobic digestion, which is similar to the digestive system of humans, to naturally break down waste before it is sent on to the next phase of treatment.

Yeast is a type of bacterium that enters your tank each time an organic waste material is flushed down the toilet, and it breaks down the waste material into sludge and effluent.

It is really beneficial to leave your septic tank alone unless the quantities of sludge and scum in your tank exceed specified criteria; otherwise, it is detrimental.

So, how will you knowhow often you should pump your septic tank?

As you can see, the sludge and scum levels in your septic tank are the two most important criteria in determining your plan of maintenance. You should have your septic tank pumped when the sludge level reaches one foot at the bottom of the tank, or when the scum layer at the top of the tank has grown to almost six inches in thickness at the top. Contrary to common assumption, the majority of homes do not require yearly pumping. It is purely dependent on the level of your tank, and not on a fixed time frame.

How to Find Out if Your Septic Tank is Full

To begin, find and gently remove the septic tank lid from its mounting bracket. Use extra caution to ensure that the heavy lid does not crack or shatter, and never leave the tank open while you are not watching it! If a person or a pet falls into the tank, which has 4-5 feet of water beneath, it may be quite deadly. In the following stage, you will examine the scum trap at the very top of the tank to see how thick the scum layer is. You should pump your septic tank when the scum level has reached 6 inches thick, as a general rule of thumb.

  1. While it is possible to acquire a specialized sludge level measurement stick, it is also possible to create your own at yourself.
  2. The velcro end will be the one that will be inserted into the aquarium.
  3. Then, holding the measuring stick straight up, verify the velcro strip for accuracy.
  4. The septic tank should be pumped after it has accumulated one foot (12 inches) of sludge, as recommended by the manufacturer.

Grant’s Septic Techs, in contrast to many other septic service companies, will actually use photographic documentation to show you exactly where your waste levels are, as well as to assist you in tracking the amount of time it takes for your scum and sludge levels to build up to the appropriate levels.

  1. If you do not require septic pumping services, there is no reason to pay for them.
  2. For the low price of $127, we will come to your home and do all of the necessary measurements for you.
  3. We’ll take actual images of your systems to document their current state and create a personalized proposal for your unique timetable.
  4. In fact, if we discover that your septic tank levels require pumping at the time of inspection, we will not charge you for the measurement service.
  5. In order to maintain the health of your septic system and get on the bestseptic tank pumping maintenance plan for your house, please contact Grant Septic Technologies at (508) 529-6255 or book a septic tank pumping appointment conveniently online.

Check to see whether your town is included in our Massachusetts service region by entering your address here.

Inspecting Your Septic Tank

Version that can be printed Septic tanks are mostly comprised of settling chambers. They provide enough time for particles and scum to separate from wastewater so that clean liquid may be properly discharged to a drainfield without contamination. Increasing the thickness of thescum and sludge layers over time results in less space and time for wastewater to settle before it is discharged to the drainfield. In the tank, one gallon of water is pumped out into the drainfield for every gallon that enters.

Septic tanks should be inspected for accumulation every one to three years until you can establish a regular pumping plan for your system.

The frequency with which particles are removed from the tank is determined by the size of the tank, the number of persons in the household, and the amount and kind of solids entering the tank.

The “stick test” process will walk you through the steps of assessing the quantity of scum and sludge in the tank, establishing the tank’s functional capacity, and determining whether or not the tank requires pumping.

See also:  How L9Ng Does It Rake For A Septic Tank To Fill Up? (Question)

What You Need to Do the Stick Test

  • One 90-degree elbow*
  • Two SxMPT threaded adapters*
  • One coupler*
  • Two feet of white rag or old gym sock
  • String or duct tape
  • A pencil or waterproof marker
  • A disinfecting solution made of 1/4 cup bleach per gallon of water in a bucket
  • A plastic bag for storing the towel, rag/sock, and gloves*. All PVC materials are 1/2-inch Schedule 40 PVC plastic
  • No other PVC materials are used.

The slime stick to the right measures 6 feet in length and has a 6-inch leg. The sludge stick is made up of two 5-foot portions that have been fastened together. Scum and sludge sticks can be any length up to 10 feet in length. (NOTE: To learn how to make the scum and sludge sticks, check Step 2 – Measuring the Scum Level andStep 3 – Measuring the Sludge Level in the following sections: Continue to Step 1 – Locate the Tanks. Additionally, see: Step 2 – Determining the Scum Concentration Step 3 – Determining the Sludge Concentration Check the baffles in step four.

Your Guide to Septic Tank Maintenance

Did you know that it might cost anywhere between $3,000 and $7,000 to rebuild an average septic tank in the United States? With this in mind, appropriate septic system maintenance is extremely necessary to ensure that your septic system continues to function properly. Routine septic system maintenance can not only save you from having to spend a lot of money on expensive repairs, but it will also help to make your home a healthier and more secure place to live in. Septic system maintenance, on the other hand, isn’t difficult to learn.

As a result, it’s critical to pay close attention to what you’re flushing down the toilet as well as the efficiency of your household equipment. More information on how to maintain your septic system may be found in the instructions provided below.

Septic System Basics

A septic tank and a drainfield are both components of your septic system. Solids and scum that have built in your wastewater are collected in a container that is placed below and is responsible for storing them. More than one in every five houses in the United States, according to the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), “rely on an individual onsite system or a small community cluster system to treat their wastewater.” Rural locations with limited access to public municipal sewers are common among households who rely on septic tank systems for waste disposal.

What is a drainfield?

Once wastewater has been discharged from the septic tank, it is sent to the drainfield. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a drainfield is a “shallow, covered excavation” in the soil that serves as part of a septic system. It is also referred to as a “leachfield” in some circles. It is possible for the drainfield to flood if it becomes swamped by wastewater and/or outside fluids. This has the potential to cause a sewage backlog.

Why is septic system maintenance so important?

Once wastewater has been discharged from the septic tank, it is sent to the drainfield for treatment. It is a “thin, covered excavation” in the soil that serves as a part of the septic system and is defined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as follows: “Leachfield” is the term used to describe this area. It is possible for the drainfield to flood if it becomes overflowed with wastewater and/or outside fluids. A sewage backlog may result as a result of this situation.

How often should I have my septic system pumped?

If your home is large enough, the overall volume of wastewater created, the number of particles present, and the size of your tank will all influence how frequently your septic system will need to be pumped. As reported by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), while the average septic system is pumped every three years, systems that have “electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently.” In general, we recommend that you get your septic system examined and pumped once a year to ensure that it is operating safely.

4 Steps to Septic System Maintenance

  • To avoid the buildup of solids in a septic system, each residence should adhere to a regular septic service plan. Step 1: Responsible Pumping The frequency of service varies from home to household, so be sure to contact your professional for their recommendation on how often your septic system should be pumped. Step 2 – High-Pressure Water Jetting — Regardless of how well a septic system is maintained, sediments and other debris will build up in the drain pipes over time. The presence of these materials causes the lines that link the septic tank to the drainfield to become clogged and ineffective. Because of this, we recommend that you get your system cleaned with high-pressure water jetting every five years to remove and clear any debris that might hinder your system from functioning correctly. The third step is to use a bacteria additive. Septic system owners should use a live organic bacteria additive that breaks down the presence of artificial compounds and solids, such as detergents and soap, that might occasionally enter your septic system. Step 4 – Use a Bacteria Additive Upon entering your septic system, these common home chemicals destroy the naturally occurring bacteria that are necessary for the system to work correctly. Bacteria additives are a low-cost insurance policy that helps to keep your pipes clean, clear, and odor-free, as well as your system operating effectively. 4) Install an Effluent Filter – Your filter, which keeps particles from entering your drainfield, has to be cleaned or changed at least once a year, or more frequently if your system is in need of repair. Some older systems might not have a filter installed in them. Please notify your technician if your septic system does not have a filter.

Septic System Dos

We recommend that you get your septic system inspected by a service specialist once a year to ensure that it is operating effectively. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, residential septic systems should be drained every three to five years. Septic system pumping frequency should be determined by a professional. Pumping a septic system when it is necessary will help to keep it from failing completely.

Do maintain your drainfield

Avoid growing gardens or trees near your drainfield if you want to keep it in good condition.

Growing roots and brushing up against your septic system will be prevented in this manner. You should also avoid parking vehicles directly on top of your drainfield.

Do limit the amount of stuff you put down your garbage disposal

The greater the amount of rubbish you put down the garbage disposal, the greater the likelihood that your septic system will be damaged. If you want to prevent clogging your system, avoid flushing cooking oil, coffee grinds, and lipids down the garbage disposal. Instead, place these objects in the garbage to be disposed of.

Do buy high-efficiency appliances

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, proper water use can help your septic system run more efficiently. In other words, the more water you waste (via clogged toilets, excessive use of your washing machine, and so on), the more water will enter your septic system. This has the ability to inflict harm as well as drainfield floods. The most straightforward method of preventing water waste is to use high-efficiency equipment. Look for Energy Starappliances, which utilize half the amount of water that conventional appliances consume.

Do save inspection reportsmaintenance records

When having their septic system repaired, homeowners should make a point of saving any and all maintenance records and inspection reports. A full report on prospective or actual leaks, as well as scum levels and potential damage, should be included in inspections of this nature. If there has been damage recorded, you should contact an expert repairman as soon as possible to get it repaired.

Septic System Don’ts

Avoid flushing anything down the toilet that isn’t toilet paper in order to avoid causing damage to your system. Other products, such as toilet paper, are not meant to break down and dissolve in septic tanks, unlike toilet paper. The majority of goods that are labeled as “flushable” should not be flushed down the toilet. Items that should not be flushed down the toilet, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, include cooking fat or oil, flushable wipes, feminine hygiene products, dental floss, diapers, cigarette butts, coffee grounds, paper towels, and cat litter, to name a few.

Don’t hire a septic system repairman who isn’t qualified

Do you require the services of a local repairman? Search the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association’s network of service providers to discover a specialist that is knowledgeable and qualified in their field.

Don’t pour chemicals down the drain

It’s important to avoid pouring chemical drain openers, oil, grease, and other harmful substances down the drain whether you’re in the kitchen or the bathroom. This will help to keep your septic system in good working order.

Don’t waste water

Conserving water is the most straightforward method of keeping a septic system operating efficiently. Some simple ways to save water include purchasing Energy Star appliances, replacing leaking faucets, and repairing toilets that are running.

Don’t put rainwater drainage systems near your drainfield

Your first aim should be to keep any objects off of and away from the drainfield area. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, surplus precipitation from a drainage system, such as a roof drain, might cause extra water to pool near your drainfield. As a result, the treatment process in your septic system will be significantly slowed.

Household Features That Affect Your Septic System

It is surprising how many people are unaware that the use of common appliances can have a detrimental impact on the condition of their septic system.

Hot tubs, trash disposals, washing machines, toilets, and showerheads are all examples of household fixtures that might reduce the effectiveness of your septic system if they are used frequently.

  • A hot tub owner should be aware that removing the water from their hot tub all at once might cause harm to their septic system. As stated by Pipeline, “hot tub water should instead be cooled and then drained onto grass or landscaped sections of your property well away from the septic tank, drainfield, or residence in compliance with local rules.” The use of a trash disposal is not recommended for homes with freestanding septic systems since they might cause damage to the system. The elimination of the usage of a trash disposal will significantly reduce the amount of particles and scum that accumulates in your septic tank. In the event that you do use a trash disposal, you will almost certainly need to pump your septic system more frequently than people who do not utilize this house amenity. machine to wash clothes (washing machine) According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the average single-family house uses roughly 70 gallons per person every day. That is a significant amount of water. Unfortunately, the greater the amount of water consumed by your household, the more overburdened your septic system will be. It raises the likelihood of failure of a septic system when it is overburdened. Those who have a septic system should restrict the quantity of laundry they wash in a single day in order to avoid this from happening. They should also use Energy Starwashing machines, which use 45 percent less water than ordinary washers
  • And a toilet – Do you hear your toilet flushing? If so, you should call your plumber. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, a toilet that is always running or leaking can waste up to 200 gallons of water every day. Yikes. Your power bill will rise as a result, and the amount of water in your septic system will increase as well. It is simple to prevent this from happening by replacing outdated toilets with high-efficiency toilets. Changing your showerhead — It may be time to replace your old showerhead with a modern, higher-efficiency one. These showerheads aid in reducing the quantity of water that seeps into your septic system by restricting the flow of water.

Other Septic Tank Maintenance Tips

At least once every one to three years, have a professional septic system specialist visit to your home to evaluate your tank and do any necessary repairs. When the technician comes, he or she will take note of the amount of scum in the tank. These levels should provide you with an indication of when and how frequently you will need to pump your septic system. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, “if the top of the scum layer is within 12 inches of the outflow, your tank should be pumped.”

How do I know if my septic system is failing?

Is the odor coming from your septic system bothersome? According to Allstate Insurance Company, this might be a warning that something is wrong with the system. Septic systems that are congested with particles are more prone to failing than those that are not. Maintenance performed on a yearly basis might help to avoid this. Another factor that might contribute to septic system failure is the system’s design and placement. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, if a septic system is placed near “unsuitable soils, severe slopes, or high ground water tables,” it may become overwhelmed with water from outside sources.

What do I do if my septic system backs up?

A sewage backup into your home is the last thing you want (or anyone wants, for that matter). The failure to maintain your septic system properly, on the other hand, might result in this. Assuming this occurs, you and your family should avoid coming into touch with the sewage. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, sewage that has backed up into your house may include hazardous diseases and nasty bacteria. Call your local health department instead of attempting to clean it up yourself to notify them of the collapse of your septic system.

If you have any possessions that have come into touch with sewage, be sure to clean them off and disinfect them.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *