How To Make Inlet Pipe Correct Slope To Tank On Septic? (Correct answer)

A typical septic tank has a 4-inch inlet located at the top. The pipe that connects to it must maintain a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward it from the house. This means that for every 10 feet of distance between the tank and the house, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches below the point at which the pipe exits the house.

How far can you run a sewer line to a septic tank?

  • Slope the pipe 1/4 inch per foot (1/8 inch per foot minimum) toward the tank. Similarly, you may ask, how do you run a sewer line to a septic tank? A typical septic tank has a 4-inch inlet located at the top. The pipe that connects to it must maintain a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward it from the house.

When installing a main drain line what is the correct level of slope?

The drain line needs to have consistent and proper slope of 1/8 to 1/4″ per foot and should have a number of access points or cleanouts along the run.

How much lower should the outlet be than the inlet on a septic tank?

Generally speaking, the outlet on a septic tank should be around 4–6″ lower than the inlet, depending on the size of the tank. The tank itself, when set in place, should be as level as possible. The height difference from inlet to outlet is accounted for in the tank’s manufacture.

Why the inlet pipe in the septic tank is higher than the outlet pipe?

Level the septic tank: The septic tank inlet tee is designed to be higher than the septic tank outlet tee. This helps assure that incoming sewage clears the baffle and enters the tank correctly, while outgoing effluent does not carry along floating solids, scum, or grease (which would clog the drainfield).

Does a sewer line have to be straight?

You should design your wastewater pipes in a similar manner, for the most part. It’s a bad plumbing practice to have a hard 90-degree bend in a horizontal drain line that’s buried in a slab or otherwise hidden. All drain lines should have a minimum fall of an eighth of an inch per foot of horizontal run.

How do you create a slope for a drainage?

Calculate the slope: Each foot of elevation drop over a 100-foot length is 1 percent. Therefore, it takes 2 feet of elevation change over each 100-foot length of a swale to create a 2-percent slope. If the distance is 10 feet, you’ll need a fall of 0.2 feet (roughly 2.5 inches) to create a 2-percent slope.

How do you slope a PVC drain pipe?

For 4-inch PVC piping and a building sewer less than 50 feet long, the minimum slope is 1 inch in 8 feet, or 1/8-inch per foot, and the maximum is 1/4-inch per foot. For sewers longer than 50 feet, the slope should be 1/4-inch per foot.

How far should inlet pipe go into septic tank?

The inlet baffle should extend at least 6 inches, but no more than 12 inches into the liquid level of the tank. The inlet baffle should extend 12 inches above the liquid level of the tank.

What size pipe goes into septic tank?

Four-inch pipe is standard, and it should extend far enough under the house to connect with the main soil stack, which is a 3-inch pipe that extends vertically past the main bathroom and through the roof.

How far should the distribution box be from the septic tank?

Common guidelines require at least 50′ clearance distance between a well and a septic system tank or 150′ between a well and a septic drainfield or leaching bed but you will see that different authorities may recommend different distances. Local soil and rock conditions can make these “rules of thumb” unreliable.

Does a septic tank need an inlet baffle?

Inlet baffles are needed for proper performance of the septic tank. Raw sewage from the residence is directed by the baffle downward into the middle zone of the septic tank. This means the effluent follows a tortuous path through the tank, which provides the necessary detention time for the larger solids to settle out.

Can a septic tank have two inlets?

Are there two inlets for the septic tank? It should not change anything. Before you get to the tank, you have to connect the lines. It will work the same as if they were under the house.

How deep should your sewer line be?

On average, trenches should be around 12-24 inches-deep, and wide enough to house your pipe comfortably before filling it in with soil and sod. As we’ve mentioned, in cold weather regions, this will need to be deeper or you’ll have problems with your sewage freezing.

What is the maximum slope of a sewer line?

What is the maximum slope allowed? The “no” zone is anything between: 1/2″ per foot and a 45 degree angle.

What is the correct fall for sewer pipe?

A gradient of 1 in 80 is suitable for commencing calculations for pipe schemes. If the gradient is less than 1 in 110, then the pipe could still block if the solids slow down and become stranded.

How to Run a Septic Tank Line From Your House

A septic system is made up of two lengths of pipe that are connected together. Initially, it runs from the house, where the system services are located, to a tank, where the waste is separated and solids settle out. The second section runs from the tank to the drainage field, where fluids from the tank are dispersed into the earth underneath the tank. The process of installing the first run of pipe is quite similar to that of installing a traditional sewage line. It is necessary to maintain a downhill slope to the storage tank.

Locating the Septic Tank

The tank serves as the nerve center of the septic system. It is required to be situated between the residence and the drainage field. Each and every septic installation must begin with a soil test, and depending on the results, soil conditions may necessitate the placement of the tank in a less-than-ideal site for digging sewer lines. Also required are minimum setback distances from property borders, functioning wells, surface water and other obstructions to provide a safe working environment.

Tank Depth

A standard septic tank has a 4-inch intake at the top, which is positioned towards the bottom. Ideally, a 1/4-inch-per-foot slope toward the pipe from the house should be maintained by the pipe connecting to it. To put it another way, for every 10 feet of distance between a tank and a home, the inlet must be 2 1/2 inches lower than where the pipe departs the house at its lowest point. The pipe usually exits at ground level, although it may need to pass beneath a foundation footing or concrete pad in rare cases.

Digging the Trench

The trench for the septic pipe should be dug before the hole for the tank since you will need a backhoe to complete the work and the tank will get in your way if it is already in the ground. To allow rainfall to drain properly, the pipe should be placed on a 2- or 3-inch bed of drain rock, so remember to account for this extra depth when digging. It is normal to use a four-inch pipe, and it should be installed far enough down to link with the main soil stack, which is a three-inch pipe that runs vertically past the main bathroom and through the roof of the home.

Precautions

Local building and health agencies will demand permits for a septic tank installation. You will also be required to submit a design plan before the permits will be provided, so prepare ahead of time. This layout should be developed in collaboration with a local builder who is familiar with the unique characteristics of the topography in your neighborhood. Stay away from planting trees or plants near the tank, drainage field, or any of the pipe systems.

They will be drawn to the pipes in their hunt for nutrition, and their roots will be able to successfully block them. You will be unable to use your septic system until the roots have been removed from the pipe. Removal may be both expensive and time-consuming.

installing drain piping on steep slopes

  • In this section, you can ask questions and express your opinions regarding sewage or septic pipe lines on steeply sloping premises.

InspectAPedia does not allow any form of conflict of interest. The sponsors, goods, and services described on this website are not affiliated with us in any way. Installing or replacing sewer lines on steep hills is a challenging task. This article discusses the construction of drain lines on steep slopes between a house and a septic tank, as well as the maintenance of drain lines. For this topic, we also have anARTICLE INDEX available, or you may check the top or bottom of the page. Use the SEARCH BOX to discover the information you’re looking for quickly.

Guide to installing the replacement sewer pipe line at Steep Sites

Using real-world examples and photographs, we demonstrate how to diagnose and replace a clogged sewage line in an actual case study. Septic or sewage line blockage and backups may be prevented by having the proper drain line slope installed. In this section, we will talk about

  • Septic pipe installed in a zig-zag pattern on steep hillsides
  • Septic pipes with a U-turn on steep hillsides
  • Septic pipework running parallel to the fall line of a slope Designing steep septic systems for sewer or septic pipe repair or new installations

Pipes running up and down steep hillsides in a zig-zag pattern On steep hillsides, U-turn septic pipe is necessary. A slope’s fall line is marked by the location of septic pipe. Designing steep septic systems for sewer or septic pipe repair or new installation;

See also:  Why Do My Farts Smell Like A Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

ZigZagging Drain Line Piping Down a Slope

zigzagging the pipe down a steep slope, making multiple bends, would be one method of reaching the required wastewater flow rate in a drain line down a steep slope. However, in my opinion, the increased number of turns and length of this approach may increase the likelihood of future sewer line blockages. Additionally, the zigzag drain line approach will make it more difficult to clean out blockages, and therefore you will need to include sewer line cleanout access points at every run and turn in the installation.

Straight-run Drain Line Piping Down a Steep Drop Slope between House and Septic Tank or Sewer Main

According to my observations, many waste line contractors simply establish a straight sewer line from the home to the septic tank or from the house to the sewage main, regardless of the building slope, as long as we have at least 1/8″ per foot, ideally 1/4″ per foot, or more, of water pressure. Drain lines with a lower slope or those are practically flat are more likely to clog. On a related note, if you’re building a drain line that may be too steeply sloped and you won’t be able to readily correct the problem, make sure to include extra cleanout access ports.

Experience in Installing Steep Sewer Drain Line Piping

According to my observations, many waste line installers simply install a straight sewer line from the house to the septic tank or from the house to the sewer main, regardless of the building slope, as long as we have at least 1/8″ per foot, preferably 1/4″ per foot, or more, of groundwater pressure.

Higher clogging risk is associated with lower slopes or drain lines that are almost flat. Regarding a related topic, if you’re installing a drain line that may be too steeply sloped and you won’t be able to simply correct the problem, make sure to include additional cleanout access ports.

Other Steps to Avoid Problems with Septic or Sewer Drain Lines on Steep Sites

  • Cleanouts of septic tanks or sewer drain lines: I’d put external cleanout access ports on the sewage line every 20 feet or so for the sake of ease. Proper septic pipe hookups include the following: Ensure that the new pipe connections are made correctly, that they are lubricated, and that they are completely seated during the assembly process. The following are the proper sewage pipe directions: The receiving pipe hub, often known as the “female” end of the pipe, is located at the bottom of the following downhill segment. Make sure you don’t do this in reverse or you’ll attract leaks and blockage in your sewage system.
  • Smooth drain line connections should be employed: the hub-less drain pipe connector shown in our photo was used to connect the new plastic waste line (which runs downhill to the septic tank) to the old cast iron waste line at the point where it exited the structure. These pipes needed to be correctly aligned (to avoid leaks at the connector) and their connections and pipe ends needed to be filed smooth in order to reduce the likelihood of waste line clogs at this point in the system.

Installing SepticDrainfieldPiping on Steep Slopes is a Different Matter Entirely

Please understand that we have examined the installation of solid plumbing between a building and its septic tank or sewage main in this articleand that higher slopes may be acceptable in some circumstances. However, the possibility of a “OK” for steep drain pipe does not apply in any manner to the perforated piping put in a septic drainfield gravel trench, which is a different story. Those looking for help on installing a septic system on a steeply sloping or rolling site should check out the following articles:

  • For further information, see AEROBIC SEPTIC SYSTEMS, ATUs, and HOME – some of these systems can be used on steep slope locations. Or SeeHOOT Aerobic Systems Drip Disposal Design and Installation Guide for more information. Alternatively, see “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as a Replacement for Conventional Title 5 Soil Absorption Systems for the Disposal of Septic Tank Effluent,” published by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection in 2006 and refining Massachusetts regulations 310 CMR 15.240, 15.242, 15.247, and 15.280-15.289
  • Or “Guidance for the Design, Installation, and Operation of Subsurface Drip Distribution Systems as SYSTEMS DE DOSAGE For hilly sites where the drainfield must be located either uphill or downhill from a septic tank or structure, PRESSURE is a term that refers to pressure dosing systems that may be beneficial for disposing of sewage. GRAVELLESS SEPTIC SYSTEMS – Other gravelless systems are capable of handling mild bends required to follow rolling slope lines
  • However, some gravelless systems are not. A system that will be required when the elevation of a structure or a septic tank is lower than the elevation of the drainfield or sewer main is Septic pumps, sewage ejector pumps, grinder pumps, effluent pumps, sump pumps, septic pumping stations, and septic pump alarms Installation of septic drainfields on steep or rolling terrain is described in STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS, which is part of the SEPTIC DESIGNS section.

Reader Q A – also see the FAQs series linked-to below

@hello there, dude. Sweep turns with a wider radius (e.g., 2 45s) will often flow better than sharper turns. On a corner where the toilet waste flow is present. If trenching provides for 4″ deeper depth, is it preferable to construct the 90° corner with a 1° drop rate as normal, or is it preferable to make the corner with two 45° corners while lowering the 4″? Thanks@Ted, Start by consulting with your local building or health department to see what type of design would be considered suitable in your nation and neighborhood.

  1. We have a shortage of service personnel for upkeep, and I believe that a sprinkler system would be more beneficial to our grounds.
  2. Thanks@Ted That doesn’t appear to be a concern in my opinion.
  3. @inspectapedia.com.moderator, Yes, without a doubt, that is not hygienic.
  4. Thanks@Ted, In a situation when you are just transferring a cleared fluid, there should be no particulates left behind in the wastewater stream.
  5. That is a very other issue.
  6. What if it’s been sitting in a septic tank for a while, breaking down as if it were going to a leach field instead?
  7. That would be the material that would be sent to the aerobic tank.

You may be required to utilize a grinder sewage pump and force main; we are in the process of establishing a traditional tank close to our home.

What is the maximum percent drop per foot for the effluent line in terms of percent drop?

@Ted.

Thank you very much.

It goes without saying that such lines must have the proper pitch in order to reach the final position of the septic tank.

You should verify with your local building authority to find out exactly what is required to be placed at a 4 foot depth in your area.

My issue is, can I dig a smaller trench and then descend vertically to the requisite four-foot depth before finishing?

Thank you for the information, it was really useful.

What would be the best configuration for the septic tank and pipes when the designated drain field area is 500 feet away from the house?

The slope before and after the hill is rather level, descending very gradually in the direction of the drain field before becoming steeper.

A construction site located in a swale below the city sewer lateral service point has been identified as a potential concern.

(Let’s pretend it’s 8 feet below the surface) Is there an alternative to the brute force strategy of bringing in hundreds of cubit yards of fill and compacting it to raise the elevation of the construction site?

A septic tank is just 18 inches away from the building foundation, which is a little near.

Solids dropping vertically have the potential to adhere to and clog the pipe; however, employing 45-degree elbows instead of 90-degree elbows can help to mitigate this danger.

I would begin by having the tank examined to identify which items are most important in this order of significance.

A sound septic tank, as opposed to one built of brick or rusted steel; how well the baffles and protection from groundwater leaks are maintained; and how well the baffles and protection from groundwater leaks are maintained.

The quality and capacity of the drainfield are important considerations.

Is this a reasonable drop?

This is an ancient septic tank that I was allowed to utilize because of a grandfather clause.

What is the length of the pipe drop when the septic tank is 120 feet away?

How steep do the pipes have to be from one drop box to the next?

Does the length of the pipe, in addition to its angle of incline, have a limit in terms of length?

Please let us know if this is the case!

Verne, you have an issue with a septic or wastewater system that has too much downslope.

The difficulty with longer segments of excessive slope sewer plumbing is that the liquid waste will occasionally overtake the solid waste in the line, causing the system to back up.

One of the most valuable aphorisms I can share, at least in the context of the building construction and mechanicals fields, is that it is extremely uncommon to come into a situation that has never been experienced before.

According to one of the solutions described on this page, the sewage line is made even longer by zig-zagging across the steeply inclined areas of the land.

See also:  How To Pump Out Rv Septic Tank? (Best solution)

I’ll leave the graphic specifics to your imagination, so go ahead and go creative.

Let’s put the question to your septic installer and see what she has to say about it.

STATIONS FOR PULLING OUT SEWAGE Hello, I have a question concerning the installation of a toilet in a cabin that is around 300 feet from the main home, septic tank, and field.

Is too much slope a concern in this circumstance, given the considerable distance that the effluent must travel to reach the tank?

Do you think that installing a sewage pump would make any difference in this situation, considering that the septic tank is located downhill from the toilet?

There should be a thorough inspection of the entire sewer line (possibly using a sewer camera), and any slope errors should be corrected.

It’s always filled, no matter how long you wait.

Is it necessary to have the angle coming out of the house re-done?

What type of valve is used to connect the pump to the drain field?

Alternatively, seeSEWER / SEPTIC LINES for STEEP SITES FAQs- questions and answers that were originally posted at the bottom of this page. Alternatively, consider the following:

Steep Slope Septic System Articles

  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN ALTERNATIVES-home
  • SEPTIC SYSTEM DESIGN BASICS-home
  • SEWER / SEPTIC LINES at STEEP SITES
  • STEEP SLOPE SEPTIC DESIGNS
  • SEPTIC CONSULTANTS, DESIGNERS, ENGINEERS
  • SEPTIC CONSULT

Suggested citation for this web page

INSPECTION OF SEWER AND SEPTIC LINES AT STEEP SITES An online encyclopedia of building environmental inspection, testing, diagnosis, repair, and issue preventive information is available at Apedia.com. Alternatively, have a look at this.

INDEX to RELATED ARTICLES:ARTICLE INDEX to DRAIN SEPTIC SEWER PIPES

Alternatives include asking a question or searching InspectApedia using the SEARCH BOXfound below.

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How Much Slope for Septic Line?

This page contains information on sitework, including how much slop for a septic line to have. Peter inquires: My builder has recently completed the installation of our septic system, and I’m afraid that he did something incorrectly. The drain field looks to be at a greater height than the tank’s exit, which is consistent with this. My brain doesn’t comprehend how the tank may empty upwards. Is there something I’m overlooking? Answer: Except if you have a mound system, or another pumping system with a dosing chamber and lift pump, you are accurate in assuming that you will require a downhill slope in your sewage pipes, which is not the case.

  • The leach lines themselves, on the other hand, should be leveled out.
  • Sewage lines should be sloped downhill to the septic tank and drain field at a rate of at least 1/4 inch per foot of length.
  • To avoid clogging, steer clear of sags and sudden curves.
  • The fear is that the water would flow too quickly and leave sediments behind, causing the pipe to clog.
  • In situations when it is important to carry wastewater uphill, there are several different pumping system types that may be employed.
  • I would consider getting in touch with the person who created your system to discuss the problem and, if feasible, have them come out and assess the location.
  • It’s ideal if you can put your complaints in writing and send them to the contractor.
  • An upward line such as the one you describe will never function effectively.
  • Also read this article.

When Is the Best Time to Take a Perc Test? How much does a perc test cost? Who Should Be Hired for the Perc Test? After a failed perc test, should you retest? Should I use a Sand Filter with my existing septic system? Examining the condition of the wellSEPTIC SYSTEMView all articles Q and A Index

Reader Interactions

Septic tanks are connected to dwellings by four-inch pipes. Image courtesy of dit26978/iStock/Getty Images. Most contemporary septic tanks, whether constructed of concrete or plastic, are divided into two compartments by an internal baffle and equipped with an intake and output port. In most cases, when you first install the tank, each port has a preinstalled 4-inch sanitary tee fitting. You connect the waste line from the building to the inlet fitting and the drain line to the outlet fitting either by gluing it or by using a mechanical flexible coupling to connect the two lines (often referred to as aFernco coupling).

  • Septic tanks used to have only one chamber in the olden days.
  • The scum layer contains greases, oils, and other lighter-than-water contaminants that could clog the soil.
  • Whatever your feelings about the necessity of the tees, they serve as an insurance policy against the failure of the septic tank baffles, and it is smart to have them installed.
  • In order to keep debris out of the pipes, some plumbers put grates on the top portions of tees.

How to Install Septic Tees

The installation of the tees on the septic tank must be done from the inside of the tank if the tees do not come with the tank. A 4-inch tee is normally firmly secured by predrilled or, in the case of concrete tanks, preformed holes in the tank’s inlet and outflow holes. A bead of butyl or silicone caulk around the perimeter of the tee on both sides of the tank will enough in most cases, but it’s not a terrible idea to apply some in case you do need glue. The top of the tee should have a short piece of tubing attached to it to allow the aperture to extend over the scum layer in the tank, while the bottom of the tee must extend below the scum layer, or around 2 feet below the tee, to allow for proper drainage.

Connecting Inlet and Outlet Pipes

The waste and drain pumps are located in trenches that slope toward and away from the tank, respectively, with a slope ranging between 2 and 10 percent. For a modest slope, it’s fine to glue the pipes straight to the tee; but, if the slope is steep, you need glue a 22 1/2-degree bend onto the tee to make the glue connection completely waterproof. If necessary, the bend can be configured such that it faces upward on the input side and downward on the outflow side. Despite the fact that the pipes fit firmly in the fittings, it is necessary to glue them together.

If you don’t, the tee may become disconnected and fall into the tank, necessitating the need of expert services to repair. A septic tank may be deadly, and falling into one or even peering into one too closely can be fatal. Never attempt to do this repair yourself.

Slope to septic tank from Shop HELP

Approximately 2 to 10 percent slope is present in the trenches for the waste and drain pumps, which are both directed toward the tank. For a modest slope, it’s fine to glue the pipes straight to the tee; but, if the slope is steep, you should glue a 22 1/2-degree bend onto the tee to ensure that your glue connection is waterproof. If necessary, the bend can be configured such that it faces upward on the intake side and downward on the exit side of the pipeline. While the pipes and fittings are snugly fitted, it is still necessary to glue them together.

Do not attempt to do this repair yourself since falling into a septic tank or simply gazing too closely into one can be dangerous.

Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home

Over 680,000 strictly plumbing related postsWelcome to Plbg.com the PlumbingForum.com. We are the best online (strictly) PLUMBING advice, help, dyi, educational, and informational plumbing forum. Questions and discussions about toilets, sinks, faucets, drainage, venting, water heating, showers, pumps, water quality, and other exclusively PLUMBING related issues. Please refrain from asking where to purchase a product, or any business, pricing, or legal questions, or for contractor referrals, or any other questions not related to plumbing. Keep all posts positive and absolutely no advertising. Our site is completely free, without ads or pop-ups. We do not sell your information. We are made possible by:
Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:keithailor (AL)In a few weeks I’ll be plumbing a mobile home to a septic tank. To get from the farthest bathroom to the septic tank following the 1/4″ per foot slope rule, I’ll have to drop vertically either at the farthest bathroom, or in the middle of the 65′ run, or near the septic tank and then continue again with the 1/4″ per foot slope into the inlet port on the septic tank. Which location is correct for making the vertical drop? I think I should do it close to the tank with long sweeps. I’ve not looked to see if the drain line is 3″ or 4″. Thanks in advance. Keith.
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Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:packy (MA)without seeing the actual layout it is hard to say.ideally put the offset close to the tank and have a 2 way cleanout available around the middle of the run.if you can’t do that, make the top part of the offset a “Y” and 45 with a cleanout in the end.
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Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:hj (AZ)1/4″ per foot is the “minimum”. If you can connect to the tank with a straight run, you do NOT have to make any vertical offsets.
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Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:LemonPlumber (FL)At the 18″past edge of the home making the drop a sanitary clean out would be good. Making it a vent better.Not sure of your frost or freeze prevention details to code.
Post Reply
Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:keithailor (AL)hj, I don’t quite understand your comment. Yes, I can do a straight run from farthest bathroom into septic tank. If I did that, my slope would be much steeper than 1/4″ per foot.unless I drop vertically (straight down toward ground – not sloped) from the farthest bathroom so that I may make a straight run using 1/4″ per foot slope all the way into the tank.
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Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:Fixitangel (NC)HJ said that 1/4″ per foot drop is the MINIMUM. If you can do a straight run to the septic and it falls much more than that, so much the better. No problem.
Post Reply
Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:keithailor (AL)Won’t the liquids outrun the solids?
Post Reply
Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:hj (AZ)quote;my slope would be much steeper than 1/4″ per foot.And what is wrong with that? I have often installed drain lines at MORE than 1/4″ per foot. You just cannot install them at LESS than 1/4″ per foot, (it CAN be done under the right circumstances but it is not “normal” for the smaller sizes uner 4″.
Post Reply
Re: Main Drain Line (Slope) Underneath Mobile Home
Author:hj (AZ)That is an “old wive’s tale” that has been debunked by MANY laboratory tests. However they are finding out that these new “superlow flush” toilets don’t have enough water to carry the solids very far and depend on other water uses to flush the line.
Post Reply
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septic tank set too high

Over 680,000 strictly plumbing related postsWelcome to Plbg.com the PlumbingForum.com. We are the best online (strictly) PLUMBING advice, help, dyi, educational, and informational plumbing forum. Questions and discussions about toilets, sinks, faucets, drainage, venting, water heating, showers, pumps, water quality, and other exclusively PLUMBING related issues. Please refrain from asking where to purchase a product, or any business, pricing, or legal questions, or for contractor referrals, or any other questions not related to plumbing. Keep all posts positive and absolutely no advertising. Our site is completely free, without ads or pop-ups. We do not sell your information. We are made possible by:
septic tank set too high
Author:mr leak (CA)House on a slab has the septic tank drain elevation installed at wrong elevation that needs correcting. The 4 inchABS has a clean out just outside the house slab then slopes towards the 1000 gal concrete septic tank CS-2 or CS-T tank. Just before the connection the installer apparently realized that the slope was 6 inches too low to connect to the inlet as the tank was not low enoughso made up the difference with a couple of 1/16 or 1/8 bends upwards to connect the tank.How to correct. I do not think jack hammeringa new lower inlet 6 inches lower would work due to the other side discharge outlet would create a waster water head back pressure?A backflow preventer would also not work because the sewer drain would not flowBottom line is the tank is set to highAny suggestions other than a supplemental intermediate pump or resetting the tank to correct elevation?Thanks will wait for reply
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Re: septic tank set too high
Author:hj (AZ)If you cannot regrade the pipe with 1/8″ per foot slope to raise it, then lowering the tank may be the best option, (but it will also entail lowering the seepage field). Whoever was there last, the septic tank installer or the house plumbing and sewer line installer, is the one who made the error and HE should correct it.Edited 2 times.
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Re: septic tank set too high
Author:packy (MA)I hope this person has not been paid.
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Re: septic tank set too high
Author:mr leak (CA)Yes paid and about 15 yeARS AGO
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Re: septic tank set too high
Author:North Carolina Plumber (NC)I would think that a pump system would be about 10 % of the price to lower the tank and field lines.
Post Reply
Re: septic tank set too high
Author:hj (AZ)What, if anything, has changed in the past 15 years, since you should have had innumerable problems with it if it has always been that way? OR, if you have not had problems, why bother with it now?
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3 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEPTIC TANK BAFFLES

By Admin on November 12, 2020 Your efforts to live as environmentally conscious as possible, as a responsible homeowner, are likely already underway, with practices such as recycling, composting, and purchasing energy-efficient equipment among your list of accomplishments. As a septic tank owner, you want to be sure that anything you put into your tank and septic field is causing the least amount of ground contamination as is reasonably practicable. Fortunately, there are a number of modest improvements you can do immediately to make your septic system even more ecologically friendly than it already is.

Have your septic tank inspected and pumped on a regular basis.

A bigger septic tank with only a couple of people living in your house, for example, will not require pumping as frequently as a smaller septic tank or as a septic tank that must manage the waste products of multiple family members will require.

When in doubt about how often to pump your septic tank, consult with a professional for advice.

In addition to locating and repairing any damage, a professional can ensure that the septic field is in good working order and that your septic tank is functional, large enough to handle your family’s waste, and not causing any unwanted pollution in nearby ground water.

Avoid flushing non-biodegradable items down the toilet or down the toilet.

Items that are not biodegradable are unable to properly decompose in the septic tank and might cause the system to get clogged.

In addition to causing issues in your house, septic system backups can damage ground water in the area surrounding your septic field.

Towels made of paper Products for feminine hygiene Grease or fats are used in cooking.

grinds from a cup of coffee Even if you have a trash disposal, the food scraps that you flush down the drain and bring into your septic system may cause unanticipated harm to your plumbing system.

Food scraps can enhance the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in the wastewater, which can disturb the natural bacterial balance of the septic tank, among other things.

Water conservation should be practiced.

Exceedingly large amounts of water use will interfere with the normal flow of wastewater from your home into your septic tank.

Limiting the amount of time you spend in the shower and turning off the faucet while brushing your teeth, as well as purchasing a smaller dishwasher and washing machine that use less water, are all simple strategies to reduce water use in your home.

The following are some basic steps you can take to make your septic system more ecologically friendly: save water, maintain your septic system and tank, and recycle wastewater. To get answers to any of your septic tank-related issues, get in touch with the experts at Upstate Septic Tank, LLC.

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