How To Make A Septic Tank More Efficient?

How to keep your septic system working properly

  1. Use water efficiently.
  2. Repair leaky faucets and running toilets.
  3. Don’t treat your toilet like a trash can.
  4. Limit your use of heavy-duty cleaners.
  5. Don’t flush toxic chemicals (or pour them down the drain).
  6. Mind your landscaping.
  7. Don’t disrupt the drain field.

  • The speed and efficiency of an aerobic waste treatment system can be put to use through septic remediation services. Pumping oxygen and aerobic bacteria into an anaerobic system can actually clean out the tank over time and restore an old or otherwise malfunctioning system.

How do you increase the efficiency of a septic tank?

Top 5 Tips for Septic Tank Maintenance

  1. Make your property more water efficient.
  2. Learn what you can and can’t pour down your drains.
  3. Carry out regular inspections.
  4. Protect your drain field.
  5. Have your tank pumped.

How do you fix a slow draining septic tank?

Dump a couple of teaspoons of baking soda into your clogged drain, followed by one half cup of vinegar. This will create a fizzing action that may cause a fizz-like eruption. This is normal. This fizzing action may help to break the clog up and get things moving in your drain once again.

Should I add anything to my septic tank?

You don’t need to add more, feed them or support them at all. If you add more bacteria without more waste, the bacteria will only eat each other. The bacteria are anaerobic, so they don’t even need air. All your tank needs to stay in shape is regular inspection and pumping to remove the solid sludge layer.

Should I add lime to my septic tank?

Hydrated lime can be bought from any hardware store. It should be added to the septic tank by either being flushed down the toilet or by running it through the kitchen sink. Approximately 5 kg of hydrated lime are needed for a regular-sized septic tank, according to the Outback Communities Authority website.

How do I improve my leach field?

3 Ways To Restore Your Drainfield

  1. Additives. Biological, organic, and inorganic additives can be used to restore functionality to a failing drainfield.
  2. Mechanical Aeration. Traditional septic tanks rely on anaerobic bacteria to assist in the breakdown of waste.
  3. Replacement.

What are the signs that your septic tank is full?

Here are some of the most common warning signs that you have a full septic tank:

  • Your Drains Are Taking Forever.
  • Standing Water Over Your Septic Tank.
  • Bad Smells Coming From Your Yard.
  • You Hear Gurgling Water.
  • You Have A Sewage Backup.
  • How often should you empty your septic tank?

Why is my septic tank filling up so fast?

If your tank seems to be filling up much more quickly, it could indicate a problem with one of its components, or it could be a sign that your tank is taking on more liquids than it can handle. Call a local professional if your tank is needing more septic pumping than usual.

Will toilet flush if septic tank is full?

A common indicator of septic tank problems is a toilet that’s slow to flush — or won’t flush at all — and a plunger can’t fix the issue. The tank may be full, or there could be a clog in the pipes.

Do I need to add enzymes to my septic tank?

But septic tanks don’t really need help from extra additives. As long as you are only putting wastewater and toilet paper down the pipes, the tank can take care of its job on its own. Putting anything extra in can cause more harm than good and it’s best to stick to the tanks natural ecosystem when possible.

How do I put good bacteria in my septic tank?

Flush a packet of brewer’s dry yeast down one toilet on the bottom floor of your house once a month. The yeast will help add “good” bacteria to your septic tank and break down waste.

Can you put too much bacteria in your septic tank?

Too much of a good thing can cause problems. A septic system relies on the correct balance of bacteria to do its job. An overpopulation of bacteria can deplete the oxygen in the septic tank and turn the environment septic. A septic, septic system is one in which the ecosystem within the tank is out of balance.

How do I raise the pH in my septic tank?

Calcium – the rationale behind using calcium in the chemical additives is that calcium will raise the pH levels of the septic tank thereby allowing the bacteria to function properly. The septic tank usually decreases the pH naturally due to the anaerobic activity so calcium can bring the pH back to optimum levels.

Does lime help with septic smell?

Lime for Sewer Smell Lime can absolutely be used for sewer odor removal and to remove persistent sewage smells in your home. This is not only because of Lime’s high pH, which helps neutralize it, but also because the calcium ions within it combine with the sulfur molecules of the sewage to create non-odorous particles.

What does lime do to raw sewage?

How Lime Treatment Works. Lime treatment controls the environment needed for the growth of pathogens in biosolids and converts sludge into a usable product. Treatment of biological wastes with lime is based on several chemical reactions.

The secrets on how to improve your septic system

The key to a well functioning septic system! Almost all of us prefer to forget that we have a septic system at all most of the time. When something is out of sight, it is definitely out of mind! When your septic system isn’t functioning properly, it may quickly turn into a real nightmare situation for you. Bad stench, water backing up in your home, and perhaps tainted wastewater ponding on your lawn are all possible consequences. Mr. Michael Deighan, our in-house septic system specialist, explains how to keep your septic system in good operating order so that you never have to deal with these concerns again, in plain English.

Because our septic system is buried in the ground, we don’t usually think about it, and it’s not an issue until it’s too late, which is often the case.

It’s difficult to think of everything, but it’s critical to plan regular pumping of your septic system since it will save you hundreds of dollars over the course of your whole life.

As the solids pile up in your septic system, the solids settling rate decreases, increasing the likelihood of short-circuiting and resulting in lower treatment effectiveness.

Inspection on a regular basis Confide in your industry specialist and the advice they give you.

These routine inspections provide you the opportunity to detect an issue before it becomes too late.

3: Maintain complete and accurate records It is critical to keep accurate records on your septic system, which should include the following information: – Septic system pumping records– Septic system maintenance records– Septic system location drawings that have been updated Selling your house, doing septic system maintenance, and completing repairs on your property will be much easier if you keep good records.

  1. Reduce the amount of water you use.
  2. It is possible to prevent overburdening your septic system and leachfield by installing high-efficiency equipment such as toilets, high-efficiency shower heads, washer/dryers, and dishwashers in your home.
  3. Among the things you should avoid taking into your system are the following: -Fats and/or Greasing -Motor oils or fuels are a type of fuel.
  4. -Coffee grinds, egg shells, and nutshells are all good options.
  5. Traditional septic systems have a lifespan of between 10 and 25 years, depending on the model.
  6. The existing septic tank may be used to increase the overall performance of the septic system by installing an aerobic treatment unit.
  7. ClearPod is a drop-in, fixed-film aerobic treatment system that treats onsite wastewater while leveraging existing infrastructure and equipment.

If you have a flash load of solids due to a high number of people attending your event, an aerobic treatment unit can assist in treating the organic load and reducing the impact on the entire system.

Better-quality wastewater exiting the septic tank implies less stress on the leachfield, allowing the system to recover more quickly.

Installation is straightforward and takes no more than an hour on average.

As a result, these pollutants have the potential to seep into the soil and contaminate the surrounding ecosystem and groundwater supplies.

This might cause damage to infrastructure or compress the soil layer, making it impossible for water to percolate freely through the Soil Layer any more.

Roof drains, sump pumps, and other drainage systems should all be installed at a downward slope from your septic system’s gradient.

Water that is not used up during the wastewater treatment process is called surplus water. Sources: If you would like more information or would like to request information on purchasing and direct shipment, please contact Mike Deighan at +1 902 940 0836 or [email protected].

How to Care for Your Septic System

Septic system maintenance is neither difficult or expensive, and it does not have to be done frequently. The maintenance of a vehicle is comprised of four major components:

  • Inspect and pump your drainfield on a regular basis
  • Conserve water
  • Dispose of waste properly
  • And keep your drainfield in good condition.

Inspect and Pump Frequently

Inspection of the ordinary residential septic system should be performed by a septic service specialist at least once every three years. Household septic tanks are normally pumped every three to five years, depending on how often they are used. Alternative systems that use electrical float switches, pumps, or mechanical components should be examined more frequently, typically once a year, to ensure that they are in proper working order. Because alternative systems contain mechanical components, it is essential to have a service contract.

  • The size of the household
  • The total amount of wastewater produced
  • The amount of solids present in wastewater
  • The size of the septic tank

Service provider coming? Here is what you need to know.

When you contact a septic service provider, he or she will inspect your septic tank for leaks as well as the scum and sludge layers that have built up over time. Maintain detailed records of any maintenance work conducted on your septic system. Because of the T-shaped outlet on the side of your tank, sludge and scum will not be able to escape from the tank and travel to the drainfield region. A pumping is required when the bottom of the scum layer or the top of the sludge layer is within six inches of the bottom of the outlet, or if the top of the sludge layer is within 12 inches of the bottom of the outlet.

In the service report for your system, the service provider should mention the completion of repairs as well as the condition of the tank.

An online septic finder from the National Onsite Wastewater Recycling Association (NOWRA) makes it simple to identify service specialists in your region.

Use Water Efficiently

In a normal single-family house, the average indoor water consumption is about 70 gallons per person, per day, on average. A single leaking or running toilet can waste as much as 200 gallons of water each day, depending on the situation. The septic system is responsible for disposing of all of the water that a residence sends down its pipes. The more water that is conserved in a household, the less water that enters the sewage system. A septic system that is operated efficiently will operate more efficiently and will have a lower chance of failure.

  • Toilets with a high level of efficiency. The usage of toilets accounts for 25 to 30% of total home water use. Many older homes have toilets with reservoirs that hold 3.5 to 5 gallons of water, but contemporary, high-efficiency toilets consume 1.6 gallons or less of water for each flush. Changing out your old toilets for high-efficiency versions is a simple approach to lessen the amount of household water that gets into your septic system. Aerators for faucets and high-efficiency showerheads are also available. Reduce water use and the volume of water entering your septic system by using faucet aerators, high-efficiency showerheads, and shower flow restriction devices. Machines for washing clothes. Water and energy are wasted when little loads of laundry are washed on the large-load cycle of your washing machine. By selecting the appropriate load size, you may limit the amount of water wasted. If you are unable to specify a load size, only complete loads of washing should be performed. Washing machine use should be spread throughout the week if at all possible. Doing all of your household laundry in one day may appear to be a time-saving strategy
  • Nevertheless, it can cause damage to your septic system by denying your septic tank adequate time to handle waste and may even cause your drainfield to overflow. Machines that have earned theENERGY STARlabel consume 35 percent less energy and 50 percent less water than ordinary ones, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Other Energy Star appliances can save you a lot of money on your energy and water bills.

Properly Dispose of Waste

Everything that goes down your drains, whether it’s flushed down the toilet, ground up in the trash disposal, or poured down the sink, shower, or bath, ends up in your septic system, which is where it belongs. What you flush down the toilet has an impact on how effectively your septic system functions.

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Toilets aren’t trash cans!

Your septic system is not a garbage disposal system.

A simple rule of thumb is to never flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down the toilet. Never flush a toilet:

  • Cooking grease or oil
  • Wipes that are not flushable, such as baby wipes or other wet wipes
  • Photographic solutions
  • Feminine hygiene items Condoms
  • Medical supplies such as dental floss and disposable diapers, cigarette butts and coffee grounds, cat litter and paper towels, pharmaceuticals, and household chemicals such as gasoline and oil, insecticides, antifreeze, and paint or paint thinners

Toilet Paper Needs to Be Flushed! Check out this video, which demonstrates why the only item you should flush down your toilet are toilet paper rolls.

Think at the sink!

Your septic system is made up of a collection of living organisms that digest and treat the waste generated by your household. Pouring pollutants down your drain can kill these organisms and cause damage to your septic system as well as other things. Whether you’re at the kitchen sink, the bathtub, or the utility sink, remember the following:

  • If you have a clogged drain, avoid using chemical drain openers. To prevent this from happening, use hot water or a drain snake
  • Never dump cooking oil or grease down the sink or toilet. It is never a good idea to flush oil-based paints, solvents, or huge quantities of harmful cleansers down the toilet. Even latex paint waste should be kept to a bare minimum. Disposal of rubbish should be avoided or limited to a minimum. Fats, grease, and particles will be considerably reduced in your septic tank, reducing the likelihood of your drainfield being clogged.

Own a recreational vehicle (RV), boat or mobile home?

If you have ever spent any time in an RV or boat, you are undoubtedly familiar with the issue of aromas emanating from sewage holding tanks.

  • The National Small Flows Clearinghouse’s Septic System Care hotline, which may be reached toll-free at 800-624-8301, has a factsheet on safe wastewater disposal for RV, boat, and mobile home owners and operators.

Maintain Your Drainfield

It is critical that you maintain the integrity of your drainfield, which is a component of your septic system that filters impurities from the liquid that emerges from your septic tank once it has been installed. Here are some things you should do to keep it in good condition:

  • Parking: Do not park or drive on your drainfield at any time. Plan your tree plantings so that their roots do not grow into your drainfield or septic system. An experienced septic service provider can recommend the appropriate distance for your septic tank and surrounding landscaping, based on your specific situation. Locating Your Drainfield: Keep any roof drains, sump pumps, and other rainfall drainage systems away from the drainfield area. Excess water causes the wastewater treatment process to slow down or halt completely.

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Septic tank systems are notoriously difficult to maintain and may be quite expensive when they fail. Over the course of almost two decades, we’ve only had to pump our septic tank once. Here’s how we maintain our system running smoothly: DIY Septic Tank Treatment

Natural Enzyme Action

Septic tanks, like your stomach, require the presence of beneficial bacteria and enzymes in order to break down the particles that travel through them. It is possible to obtain these helpful bacteria and enzymes from a variety of sources, but one of our favorites is rotting tomatoes. These naturally occurring enzymes are proteins known as Pectinase or Pectinolytic enzymes, and they break down pectin. Lipase, hydrolyzes, and lyase are all members of the pectinase family of enzymes that are capable of breaking down pectin and plant cell walls in the natural environment, therefore aiding in the decomposition and recycling of waste plant materials.

DIY Septic Tank Treatment

It is simple and inexpensive to treat a septic tank with DIY solutions. We “feed” our septic tank 3-4 rotting tomatoes every 3 months or so, which we do through our garbage disposal. The idea is to make sure that you split up the tomato and pass only half a tomato or so at a time through the water while it is running to ensure that it is properly flushed out. As an alternative, if you don’t have access to a garbage disposal, you may throw two or three large rotting tomatoes in a bag (chances are they’re already packed away in a bag in your refrigerator and starting to liquefy anyway!).

Dump them into a toilet (but don’t use bleach!) and flush them away.

Normally, having rotten tomatoes every few months isn’t a big deal because the garden overproduces in the spring, summer, and fall, and there are always a few extras available.

However, during the winter months, tomatoes have gotten pushed to the back of the fridge and started to liquefy before I realized what was happening. At the very least, they aren’t going to waste completely.

Toilet Paper No-No’s

When we had our septic system pumped for the first time in more than two decades, we were assured that it was totally unnecessary because the system was operating well and looked fantastic. During our conversation, the gentleman shared numerous true horror stories of systems he’d witnessed at his place of employment where the families utilized “fluffy” toilet paper. That one where the cute little bears in the advertisements are pleased of themselves for not having any lint left behind? You know the one I’m talking about.

Image courtesy of Ian Haycoxis (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0).

He especially inquired about the brand of tissue we use, which is Scott Tissue.

Alternatively, if you don’t happen to have any rotting tomatoes on hand, you may use baking or brewing yeast to bring healthy bacteria to your tank as an alternative.

How to Clean Septic Tank Naturally

Yeast and sugar are excellent natural septic tank cleaners, and here’s an easy method for using them.

Septic Tank Cleaner

2 cups granulated sugar 5 cups of hot water (optional) 3 tbsp. active dry yeast Sugar and yeast should be dissolved in water. Pour the mixture into a toilet (that does not contain bleach!) and flush it. This is best done at night so that the yeast may continue to work throughout the night; do not flush for at least 3 hours after completion.

Additional Tips:

1Avoid flushing raw or cooked meat down the toilet, down the garbage disposal, or any other form of introducing meat into your septic system; meat is NEVER a helpful bacterium. 2. Never add oils, grease, or fat in any form (solid or liquid) to your tank. This includes, but is not limited to, cooking oils, bacon grease, meat grease from draining ground beef/turkey, and other fat-containing foods. 3Avoid flushing anything other than garbage and toilet paper down the toilet; this means that feminine products should be disposed of in the trash, baby diapers and wipes should be disposed of in the trashcan, and so on.

Have you tried the rotten tomato technique yet?

Love this DIY Septic Tank Treatment Idea? Pin it!

On December 5, 2020, the information was updated. However, while this isn’t an enjoyable topic for polite discussion, having your septic system back up into your home is far from pleasant. There are actions that you can do to not only avoid septic issues in the future, but also to guarantee that the process of breaking down flushed waste proceeds as it should.

A Well-Functioning Septic System

The title of this article may be “The Care and Maintenance of the Gut in Your Yard,” which would be more descriptive. Understanding the necessity and advantages of eating dietary fiber, alkaline-forming foods, and taking probiotics for your own gut health will help you recognize the similarities between keeping a healthy septic system and maintaining a healthy digestive system. There are some items that you should avoid putting into any septic system, just as there are certain substances that are favorable to putting into our own digestive systems.

If you wait until there is a problem, you have waited too long and should contact a septic cleaning firm to pump your tank immediately. Slow water drainage, as well as water backing up in the toilet, dishwasher, tub, or sinks, are signs that you may have a septic system problem.

Septic System Care and Maintenance Tips:

  • A family of four living in a house with a 1,000-gallon tank should have their septic system cleaned every four years, according to the EPA. Inquire with your local septic cleaning firm about how frequently you should contact them
  • Avoid using bleach-containing solutions to clean your toilets since it kills the bacteria that are necessary for the breakdown of waste particles in your septic system. Try this all-natural toilet cleanser
  • It works great.
  • When you add yeast to your septic system, it helps to aggressively break down waste particles, which is beneficial. Using the first time, flush a 12-cup package of dried baking yeast down the toilet. After the initial addition, add 14 cup of instant yeast every 4 months for the next 4 months. For those who are planning to install or have their existing septic system pumped, it’s a good idea to know precisely where it is in your yard so that you don’t have to dig up a lot of your lawn when the system is pumped in the future. With a tape measure, measure the precise distance between the septic tank lid and the home, and then snap a photo of the exact distance with your mobile phone to prove you were accurate. Maintain a copy of the snapshot in a home maintenance file on your computer for future reference.
Deborah Tukua

Deborah Tukua is a natural living and healthy lifestyle writer who has written seven non-fiction books, including Naturally Sweet Blender Treats. She lives in Hawaii with her family. Since 2004, she has contributed to the Farmers’ Almanac as a writer.

Keep Exploring

A compelling argument exists for the continued usage of septic tanks in this day and age of cutting-edge technology. It is effective. With the proper design, a septic tank can handle more than 45 percent of the eventual treatment. The environmental significance of advanced onsite and effluent sewer technologies has been demonstrated by their ability to provide highly reliable, affordable, and permanent wastewater treatment to users around the world. In short, passive—energy-free—septic tanks are the most cost-effective form of primary treatment available for non-industrial sewage.

The majority of rural residential applications are found in this category.

Furthermore, septic tank pre-treatment often precludes the need for additional secondary treatment alternatives such as constructed wetlands, pond When a larger treatment, storage, or surge capacity is required, several tanks are frequently employed in parallel or series arrangements to achieve this.

Due to growing awareness of chemical toxicity, many municipalities have passed ordinances prohibiting the use of harsh chemicals in drainage systems such as drains, traps, and septic systems.

It is also easily treated by either aerobic or anaerobic secondary processes.

Aside from that, detergents and other common home pollutants have been shown to impair important microbial breakdown activity in septic systems.

When used on a regular basis,MICROCAT-STcan save money on plumbing

How to Naturally Clean & Maintain Your Septic System

Without the proper knowledge, septic systems may be difficult to keep up with and manage. If you suspect that your toilets aren’t flushing properly or that your pipes may need some cleaning, you should avoid introducing harsh chemicals into your septic system since they can disturb the naturally existing biome of bacteria that is necessary for the system to work effectively. Our team at Fagone Plumbing was inspired to publish a blog post that would teach readers how to add a natural cleanse to their septic system without endangering the system’s performance.

Simple, Quick Cleanse

This procedure is a quick, mild remedy that is also effective. It is very simple to use. It is necessary to use the power of baking soda, vinegar, and lemon to achieve success with this procedure. Starting with a quarter-cup baking soda and a half-cup vinegar mixture, pour it directly into the toilet. Repeat this process several times. After that, squeeze in two teaspoons of lemon juice. A chemical reaction occurs when the baking soda and vinegar are mixed, resulting in a fizzing sound and the breakdown of grime and debris.

Following a flush, this solution will clean the inside of your toilet bowl and the pipes that run through your system as a result.

Homemade Septic Tank Treatment

As previously stated in this article, healthy bacteria are required to guarantee that your septic system is operating effectively. Because of the bacteria in your system, sediments are broken down more quickly, allowing for simpler movement to the leach field. In addition, it is beneficial when it comes time to have your septic system pumped. The following are the elements that will be necessary for this natural solution: Water, sugar, cornmeal, and dry yeast are the main ingredients. Prepare the combination by first heating around a half gallon of water until it comes to a boil.

  • Because the sugar will function as the initial food source for your bacteria!
  • Allow the cornmeal to absorb the water before mixing everything together until it is well mixed.
  • Once everything has been blended, pour the mixture into the toilet and flush it.
  • That way, you may be certain that the mixture is pushed all the way into your septic tank.

Upon completion of this treatment, your tank should have returned to a healthy bacterial environment. It is recommended to give these cleanses every 6 months or so, but only if you feel that there is a shortage of microorganisms in the system.

Fagone Plumbing Can Help!

If you have any reason to believe your septic system may be performing better, give Fagone Plumbing a call right away! It doesn’t matter if it’s a bacteria problem or something else; we will be able to assess the problem and deliver the most cost-effective solution to get your septic system back up and running correctly!

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The Advantages and Disadvantages of a Septic Tank System

When it comes to dealing with waste water in your house, there are two options. One method is through the use of municipal sewage lines, which convey waste water from your property to a treatment plant in the area. A septic tank is the second type of source of sewage. In light of the above, the specialists at Steve Mull Plumbing would like to discuss with all of our valued clients the different pros and disadvantages of a septic tank system, as well as some alternatives. A septic tank is a tank that is built beneath the earth and away from your home.

The water itself is pushed out of the septic tank and into the earth, and the waste is collected separately until it is time for periodic maintenance, at which point it is pumped out once again.

The Advantages of a Septic Tank System

Because massive underground sewer lines are extremely expensive to construct, install, and operate, a septic tank is often the most cost-effective option. A septic tank, on the other hand, is far less expensive to build and does not need homeowners to pay monthly maintenance fees. Another advantage of a septic tank is that they are extremely long-lasting and, when properly kept, need very little maintenance. The fact that septic tanks are ecologically friendly is a last advantage of using one.

Furthermore, because all of the recycled water is absorbed by various sorts of plant life in the surrounding area, it is extremely ecologically beneficial.

Disadvantages of a Septic Tank System

It is possible for septic lines to become blocked by a variety of different products that should not be flushed down the toilet or poured down the drain. It is possible to discover a blocked septic tank by the presence of a slow-draining sink or tub, as well as toilets that flush at an equally sluggish rate. If you see any of these indicators, contact a licensed plumber immediately so that they can assess the situation and suggest appropriate remedies. An additional drawback of a septic tank is that it must be pumped every 2-5 years, at a cost to the homeowner ranging between $250 and $450 every pumping.

  • When a drainage pipe is broken, whether by tree roots, a digging accident, or even a car or other object interfering with the pipe, you will almost certainly find yourself in the midst of a major problem and a resulting mess.
  • This will necessitate the urgent replacement of the damaged drainage pipe, which can be rather expensive.
  • Remember, if you have a septic tank and are experiencing issues with it, or if you are in need of any sort of plumbing services or repairs, the professionals at Steve Mull Plumbing are the ones to contact.
  • We are looking forward to the opportunity to serve you and to provide you with the greatest quality plumbing products and services this side of Tennessee.

Do not hesitate to contact our staff as soon as you discover that you have a plumbing problem on your hands. Get in touch with our helpful staff today!

Top 5 Tips for Septic Tank Maintenance Help & Advice

For many years to come, your septic tank may be a valuable tool in the management of your waste water. In order to get the most out of your investment and guarantee that your tank stays in excellent working order for the foreseeable future, you will need to take certain precautions to keep on top of the unit’s upkeep. Maintaining your tank in excellent condition will not only increase the lifespan of the unit, but it will also limit the risk of unforeseen failures or problems emerging, which may be very expensive to repair or replace later.

Make your property more water efficient

Putting undue strain on your tank and causing it to become weakened, damaged, or obstructed is the result of repeatedly overloading your system with too much water. By making your appliances more water efficient, you may lessen the burden placed on your septic tank, therefore extending the life of the system. You can make your home more water efficient in a variety of ways, whether it’s by repairing a leaking toilet, only running your washing machine or dishwasher when there’s a full load, or installing energy-efficient toilets or shower heads.

Learn what you can and can’t pour down your drains

There are some chemicals that should never be flushed down the toilet because the bacteria in your septic tank operate on a sensitive equilibrium, and the introduction of certain elements can either disturb the pH balance and prevent the bacteria from breaking down waste, or cause clogs in the system. You should avoid flushing the following objects down the toilet or down your sink:.

  • Fats, oils, and grease
  • Disposable diapers
  • Wet wipes
  • Coffee grounds, egg shells, and nut shells
  • And a variety of other materials Tobacco cigarettes that have filters in them. Items of sanitary hygiene for women
  • Paper towels
  • Paints or chemicals
  • Or other materials

Making certain that none of these things find their way into your septic tank will aid in the maintenance of the system and the prevention of damage.

Carry out regular inspections

Through frequent inspection of your septic tank, you will be more likely to detect growing problems early on, allowing for a more expedient and less expensive septic tank repair. If you don’t check on the condition of your tank on a regular basis, you might be in for a bad surprise if it suddenly stops operating one day. Examine the tank itself, as well as any visible components, the drain field, and any surrounding ground, for any evidence of damage or leakage from the tank. By checking your tank, you may also determine how full it is, allowing you to schedule an appointment to have your septic tank emptied ahead of time.

An inspection and cleaning of the septic tank should be performed once every few months.

Protect your drain field

Your drain field is equally as vital as your septic tank, and any damage that occurs here can have a severe impact on how effectively your tank can handle waste – you may even discover that your tank becomes clogged and overflows because it doesn’t have a proper outlet for the waste to go to.

You should never park or drive on your drain field, and you should avoid planting or growing trees in this area since root penetration might impede the flow of waste water through the drain field.

Have your tank pumped

Septic tank pumping should be performed on a regular basis as part of normal septic tank servicing to ensure that it is operating at peak performance. It is usually assumed that a tank will only require pumping every 3-5 years, depending on how much use it receives. This is not always true. However, even though it is improbable that your tank would fill up so rapidly, we recommend that you get your septic tank pumped on a yearly basis by a professional. The greater the amount of waste that your tank can carry, the less efficiently it will function and the greater the likelihood that it may become damaged in some manner; it is better to be careful than to take the chance that this will happen!

No matter what time of day it is, we will be pleased to assist you with your septic tank pumping needs.

To learn more about our routine septic tank emptying service, as well as all of our septic tank draining services, please get in touch with us immediately.

Caring for Your Septic System

It is important not to flush any sort of wipe down the toilet, regardless of whether the box specifically states that they are “flushable.” These objects have the potential to block your home’s plumbing, as well as the pipes in the street and the important machinery at the wastewater treatment facility. The water in which personal care wipes, dental floss, paper towels, and tissues are flushed does not dissolve them rapidly – or at all – therefore they are not safe to flush down the toilet. Personal care items, cleaning supplies, and other home garbage should be disposed of appropriately, either in the trash, the recycling bin, or at your local domestic hazardous waste disposal facility.

  • The term “septic system” refers to an individual wastewater treatment system (conventional septic systems, innovative/alternative (I/A) systems, or cesspools) that uses the soil to treat tiny wastewater flows, which are typically generated by a single residence.
  • There are various types of septic systems in use today.
  • In a normal septic system, there are three main components: the septic tank, a distribution box, and a drainfield, which are all connected by pipes known as conveyance lines.
  • Primary treatment is the term used to describe this separation procedure.
  • Flowing from the tank into a distribution box, which distributes the wastewater uniformly into a network of drainfield trenches, is how partially treated effluent is removed from the environment.

This effluent then slowly seeps into the underlying soil where it is further cleansed and purified (secondary treatment) (secondary treatment). A properly operating septic system does not damage the groundwater.

Additional Resources for What is a Septic System?

According to the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, a properly maintained septic system should be pumped out at least once every three years! Regular maintenance is the most crucial factor in ensuring that your septic system is in good working order. Pumping on a regular basis helps to keep particles from leaking into the drainfield and blocking the soil pores. While the frequency of pumping depends on the amount of consumption, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection advises that systems be pumped at least once every three years for households without a trash disposal.

  1. The frequency with which you pump should be determined by the amount of water that has accumulated and the amount of water that has been pumped in the past.
  2. It is astounding how many system owners assume that if they have not experienced any difficulties with their systems, they do not need to pump out their tanks.
  3. Solid materials sink to the bottom of the tank when your system is utilized, resulting in the formation of a sludge layer.
  4. In most cases, correctly engineered tanks have adequate room to safely store sludge for up to three to five years at a time.
  5. As the amount of sludge in the system rises, more solid wastes are allowed to escape into the soil absorption system (SAS).

When hiring a pumper, be certain that they are licensed by the local Board of Health, and always insist on receiving a paid receipt from the pumper that clearly outlines the terms of the transaction and the amount you paid (how many gallons were pumped out of the tank, the date, the charges, and any other pertinent results).

In addition, a copy of this report is forwarded to the local Board of Health by the pumper.

Additional Resources for How often should I pump out my septic system?

  • Once every 3 to 5 years, have the system examined and pumped out. If the tank becomes overburdened with sediments, the wastewater will not have enough time to settle before it overflows down the drain. After that, the extra solids will be carried to the leach field, where they will block the drain pipes and the soil. Always know where your septic system and drain field are in relation to your house and keep a detailed record of all inspections, pumpings, repairs, contract or engineering work for future reference. Keep a sketch of it on hand for when you go to the service center. The drain field should be planted above the septic system with grass or small plants (not trees or bushes) to help keep the system in place. Controlling runoff through imaginative landscaping may be an effective method of reducing water consumption. Install water-saving devices in faucets, showerheads, and toilets to limit the amount of water that drains into the septic system and into the environment. Replace any dripping faucets or leaking toilets, and only use washing machines and dishwashers when they are completely full. Avoid taking long showers. Roof drains as well as surface water from roads and slopes should be diverted away from the septic system. Maintain a safe distance between the system and sump pumps and home footing drains as well. Take any remaining hazardous substances to a hazardous waste collection station that has been approved by the local government. Use bleach, disinfectants, drain and toilet bowl cleaners sparingly and in line with the directions on the product labels. Only utilize septic system additives that have been approved for use in Massachusetts by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP). In Massachusetts, it has been found that the additives approved for use have no detrimental effect on the particular system or its components, or on the environment in general.
  • Non-biodegradables (cigarette butts, diapers, feminine items, and so on) and grease should not be disposed of down the toilet or sink. The use of non-biodegradable materials can clog the pipes, and grease can thicken and block the pipes as well. Cooking oils, fats, and grease should be stored in a container and disposed of in the garbage
  • Paint thinner, polyurethane, antifreeze, insecticides, certain dyes, disinfectants, water softeners, and other harsh chemicals should all be added to the system to ensure that it works properly. Septic tank malfunctions can be caused by the death of the biological component of your septic system and the contamination of groundwater. Typical home cleaners, drain cleaners, and detergents, for example, will be diluted in the tank and should not do any damage to the system
  • And Make use of a garbage grinder or disposal that drains into the septic tank to eliminate waste. If you do have one in your home, you should use it only in extremely limited circumstances. The addition of food wastes or other solids lowers the capacity of your system and increases the frequency with which you must pump your septic tank. If you utilize a grinder, you will have to pump the system more frequently. Trees should be planted within 30 feet of your system, and vehicles should not be parked or driven over any section of the system Tree roots may block your pipes, and heavy cars may cause your drainfield to collapse
  • However, you can prevent this from happening. You should not allow anybody to work on your system or pump it without first ensuring that they are licensed system specialists
  • Wash an excessive number of loads of clothing in your washing machine. Doing load after load deprives your septic tank of the time it needs to properly process wastes and causes the entire system to become overwhelmed with surplus wastewater. As a result, you might be overflowing your drain field without giving yourself enough time to recover from the inundation. To calculate the gallon capacity and the number of loads per day that may be safely pumped into the system, you should speak with a tank specialist. Cleaning the plumbing or septic system using chemical solvents is recommended. Microorganisms that devour toxic wastes will be killed by “miracle” chemicals that have been developed. These items have the potential to pollute groundwater as well.
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Key Actions for Septic System Do’s and Don’ts

Septic systems that have been properly maintained can assist in preventing the spread of disease and other illnesses. System failures can have serious consequences.

  • Your failure to maintain your water system could pose a serious health hazard to your family and neighbors, degrade the environment, particularly lakes, streams and groundwater, reduce the value of your property while also being extremely expensive to repair
  • And put thousands of water supply users at risk if you live in a public water supply watershed and fail to maintain your system.

Keep an eye out for the following warning signals of a malfunctioning system:

  • Surface sewage over the drainfield (particularly after storms)
  • Sewage backups in the home
  • Lush, green vegetation over the drainfield sewage smells
  • Toilets or drains that are difficult to empty

If your system fails, the first thing you should do is call your local board of health, which must authorize all modifications and the majority of repairs before they can be carried out or installed.

The board of health will inform you of the steps that must be taken. In the event that your system fails, contact your local Board of Health immediately!

Key Actions for Failing Septic Systems Can Be Hazardous to Your Health

This Article Discusses Mound Systems are a type of system that is used to build mounds. Alternative Systems are also available. View and post commentsQuestions Septic System FAQsView all articles on the SEPTIC SYSTEM If your lot does not pass the perc test, some towns may enable you to construct an engineered system as a backup plan if the perc test fails. For waterfront estates and other ecologically sensitive places, alternative water-treatment systems may also be necessary to aid in the protection of water supplies.

  • A “mound” system operates in much the same way as a normal system, except that the leach field is elevated above the natural grade.
  • They require more frequent monitoring and maintenance in order to avoid complications.
  • It is possible that the technology will not operate as planned if either the designer or the installer is inexperienced with the technology.
  • The design of a system is particular to the soil type, site circumstances, and degree of consumption that is being considered.
  • Some states and municipalities will only accept system types that have been certified in their jurisdiction, and they may also demand that the owner maintain a service contract with a vendor that has been approved by the state or municipality.

MOUND SYSTEMS

Mound systems are often two to three times more expensive than ordinary septic systems, and they need more frequent monitoring and maintenance. To see a larger version, click here. Ohio State University Extension provides the following information: The mound is comprised of a network of tiny distribution pipes that are embedded in a layer of gravel on top of a layer of sand that is normally one to two feet deep. Topsoil is applied to the tops and sides of the structure (see illustration). A dosing chamber (also known as a pump chamber) is included in a mound system, and it is responsible for collecting wastewater that is discharged from the septic tank.

Most feature an alarm system that notifies the owner or a repair company if the pump fails or if the water level in the tank increases to an unsafe level.

Aside from that, monitoring wells are frequently placed to keep track on the conditions inside and outside the leach field.

The most expensive items are the additional equipment, as well as the earthwork and other materials that are required to construct the mound.

In extreme cases, a mound system can cost more than $20,000 in some locations. Additionally, owing of the increased complexity, mound systems need more regular pumping as well as additional monitoring and maintenance. In certain cases, annual maintenance expenditures may exceed $500.

OTHER ALTERNATIVE SEPTIC SYSTEMS

Sand filters that do not have a bottom are frequent on coastal properties and other ecologically sensitive places. There is a large variety of alternative septic systems available on the market, with new ones being introduced on a regular basis. Some are designed at community systems that serve a number of houses, and they are often monitored and maintained by a professional service provider. Some alternative systems are well-suited to particular houses, albeit the costs, complexity, and upkeep of these systems must be carefully evaluated before implementing them.

Before the wastewater reaches the leach field, which serves as a miniature replica of a sewage-treatment plant, some larger community systems employ pre-treatment to reduce the amount of bacteria present.

There are numerous other versions and combinations of systems and components that may be employed, including the following:

  • Pressurized dosing: This method makes use of a holding tank and a pump to drive effluent through the distribution pipe in a more uniform and regulated manner, hence boosting the effectiveness of the leach field. When used in conjunction with other techniques, such as a mound system, a sand filter, plastic leach fields or drip irrigation, it can be used to rehabilitate a leach field
  • However, it should not be used alone.
  • Septic system with alternative leach field made of plastic: This is a normal septic system with an alternative leach field that may be shrunk in some jurisdictions, making it ideally suited for tiny construction sites. Because the half-pipe plastic chambers provide a gap for effluent flow, there is no need for gravel in the system. Infiltrator System, for example, has been in service for more than two decades and, according to the manufacturer, can withstand traffic volumes with only 12 inches of compacted cover. The higher cost of the plastic components is somewhat countered by the lower cost of gravel and the smaller area of the drain field, respectively.
  • Sand filter: This is a big sand-filled box that is 2-4 feet deep and has a waterproof lining made of concrete or polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Using filtration and anaerobic microorganisms, the sand is utilized to pre-treat wastewater before it is discharged into the leaching field. The boxes are often partially or completely buried in the ground, although they can also be elevated above ground level as necessary. While a pump and controls are typically used to equally administer the effluent on top of the filter, gravity distribution is also viable in some instances. The most common setup is shown in Figure 1. A collection tank at the bottom of the tank collects the treated effluent, which is either pumped or gravity-fed to the drain field. Some sand filters recycle the effluent back to the tank multiple times before discharging it into the drain field, while others do not. The majority of sand filters are used for pre-treatment, although they can also be utilized as the primary treatment in certain situations. A “bottomless sand filter” is used in this situation since the effluent drains straight into the soil underneath the filter (see photo above). A well designed and manufactured sand filter that is regularly maintained will prevent sand from being clogged on a consistent basis. More information about Sand Filters may be found here.
  • Aerobic treatment system: These systems treat wastewater by the use of an aerobic process, which is normally carried out in an underground concrete tank with many chambers. Aeration, purification, and pumping of the effluent are all accomplished through the use of four chambers in the most complicated systems. The first chamber functions similarly to a smaller version of a regular septic tank in its function. An air pump is employed in the second “treatment” tank to ensure that the effluent is continually injected with fresh air. The presence of oxygen promotes the growth of aerobic bacteria, which are more effective in processing sewage than the anaerobic bacteria found in a standard septic system. It is possible to utilize a third and fourth chamber in certain systems to further clarify the water and to pump out the purified water. In addition, so-called “fixed-film” systems make use of a synthetic media filter to help the bacterial process go more quickly. In the correct hands, aerobic systems may create better-quality wastewater than a typical system, and they may also incorporate a disinfectant before the purified wastewater is discharged. A smaller drain field may be used in urban areas while a larger area may be sprayed across a whole field in rural areas. Technically speaking, they are tiny sewage treatment plants rather than septic systems, and they rely mostly on anaerobic treatment to accomplish their goals. They are referred to as ATUs in some circles (aerobic treatment units). Installation and maintenance of these systems are prohibitively expensive
  • As a result, they are mostly employed in situations where high-quality treatment is required in a small area or with poor soils. A growing number of them are being built on beachfront sites. More information about Anaerobic Treatment Systems may be found here.
  • Using a pump, wastewater is sent via a filtering mechanism and onto an array of shallow drip tubes that are spaced out across a vast area for irrigation. In order to send reasonably clean water to the system, a pretreatment unit is often necessary. Alternatively, the water may be utilized to irrigate a lawn or non-edible plants, which would help to eliminate nitrogen from the wastewater. This sort of system may be employed in shallow soils, clay soils, and on steep slopes, among other conditions. Frozen tubes can pose problems in cold areas since they are so close to the surface of the water. Expect hefty installation fees, as well as additional monitoring and maintenance, just as you would with other alternative systems.
  • Wetlands that have been constructed. These are suitable for those who are environmentally conscious and wish to take an active role in the recycling of their wastewater. They may be used in practically any type of soil. An artificial shallow pond is used in the system, which is lined with rock, tire chippings, or other suitable medium and then filled with water. A pleasant atmosphere is created by the media, which serves as a habitat for particular plants that process wastewater and maintain the ecosystem. Wastewater from the septic tank is dispersed across the media bed through a perforated conduit, where plant roots, bacteria, and other microorganisms break down the contaminants in the water. The treated water is collected in a second pipe located at the back of the marsh. Household members must budget time for planting, pruning, and weeding in the wetlands area.

Additional resources: National Small Flows Clearinghouse Inspectapedia.com You may also be interested in:Who Should I Hire For Perc Test? Whether or not alternative septic systems are permitted. Is It Possible for Septic Systems to Last a Lifetime? How Much Slope Do You Need for a Septic Line? Performing an Inspection on a Septic System When Is the Best Time to Take a Perc Test? Should I use a Sand Filter with my existing septic system? Examination of the WellSEPTIC SYSTEMView allSEPTIC SYSTEMarticles Return to the top of the page

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