How To Check Float On Septic Tank? (TOP 5 Tips)

The top float is the high water alarm. To check this, turn it upside down. It should sound an alarm.

How do you test a septic float?

Troubleshooting a Sticking Float in a Septic Tank

  1. Lift the maintenance access hole cover from the tank and set it aside.
  2. Observe the location of the electrical wires and debris in the tank.
  3. Raise the float to its fully open position, and if the pump does not pump or the alarm does not sound, give the float a bump.

How do I know if my float switch is bad?

If it is, try this easy fix: check whether an object is preventing the overfill float from moving up and down freely. If the float is stuck in its highest position, the fill valve won’t let water into the tub. If that doesn’t take care of it, the overfill float switch or water inlet valve may be broken.

How do you test a float?

Attach the MultiMeter leads to the float switch wires. The Multimeter should be set to the Ohms. The MultiMeter should read zero when the float hangs in the down position. Lifting the float will change the zero to one.

How do you tell if a septic pump is working?

To test if the pump is working, first turn the pump on by turning the second from the bottom float upside down. While holding that float upside down, turn the next float up (that would be the second from the top), upside down. You should hear the pump turn on.

Do float switches fail?

While these switches are very reliable for industrial applications, they can fail. As with any piece of equipment, a float switch will have a limited operating life. However, if the switch is used properly and maintained, there is no reason that it should not last for many years.

How do septic tank floats work?

The control floats are set so that a specific volume of sewage is sent to the drainfield. This specific amount is referred to as a “dose.” When sewage in the pump tank reaches the “on” float, the pump is activated and pumps sewage out until it reaches the “off” float (See diagram below.)

Where is the float switch?

Your float assembly is found inside the dishwasher’s tub, on the bottom. The water that fills your dishwasher lifts the float, and when it reaches a certain level, it acts as a trigger for the float switch. The float triggers the float switch to shut off, thereby shutting off the flow of water into the dishwasher.

How do you float test eggs?

Simply fill a bowl with cold tap water and place your eggs in it. If they sink to the bottom and lay flat on one side, they are fresh and good to eat. A bad egg will float because of the large air cell that forms at its base. Any floating eggs should be thrown out.

Is the egg float test real?

If eggs sink to the bottom of a bowl of cold water and lie flat on their sides, they are very fresh. If they are less fresh but still good to eat, they will stand on one end at the bottom. If they float to the surface, they are no longer fresh enough to eat.

How do you adjust the float on a sewage pump?

Adjusting a manual float switch is easy. Start by moving the rod or tether up or down based on the water level in the pit. Most systems can be adjusted by hand or with a normal sized screw driver. Shorter tethers and rods work best for lower water levels while higher tethers and rods are better for higher water levels.

How high should the float be on a sump pump?

The Float Switch should hang a few inches above the top of your sump pump motor. The exact height will vary depending on the size of your sump pit and the power of your sump pump motor.

How long do float switches last?

These old float switches didn’t have many operations and needed to be replaced about every 3 years or so, making them expensive to keep up with. However, new float switch manufacturers are producing water level control technology that is getting rid of old float switches for good.

How to Check Your Septic Panel and Pump Chamber

It is recommended that you inspect your pump chamber once a year to ensure that everything is in proper working order. Follow the 11-step procedure outlined below to complete this task on your own! (Do you require further assistance? Alternatively, you may watch our instructional video below.)

‍ 1. Let’s start by inspecting the panel. Make sure the power is on by verifying the power switch to the panel is on.

The following items should be included in this general overview: The electrical box may be seen in the lower left corner of the image below, starting at the bottom of the image. Check to verify that all of the cables are firmly connected before using it. Next, take a look at the lower right corner of the shot, where you can see the discharge pipe for the pump. Check to see if it is operational (valve should be lined up with pipe). It’s now time to have some fun!

‍ FIRST.PUT ON GLOVES!That is one step you DO NOT want to miss. Remove the float tree (the pipe with a pvc handle located upright left in our picture) and pull up the alarms.

*Please keep in mind that these instructions are for a 4-float system. Some systems contain only two or three floats.

If you don’t hear an alarm, this is cause for concern. Starting at the top, I will explain the floats and how to ensure each one is working.

NOTE: If your water supply is depleted, you may need to replenish it. Fill it up a little with water from a yard hose.

7. Continue testing.

Check that the pump is operating properly by flipping the second float from the bottom upside down and then turning it back around. With your other hand, turn the next float up (which would be the second from the top) upside down while still holding the first float. You should be able to hear the pump start up. As soon as you have confirmed that the pump is operational, just release these two floats. There’s one more float to go. The top float serves as an alert in case of high water. Turn it over down to see whether this is the case.

8. Now is the time to inspect the power cords.

Check to see that everything is securely tied to the float tree and not just hanging free. Zip ties can be used to reattach any stray cables.

9. Securely return the float tree to its holder and coil any dangling cords so that they are out of the water.

Pump chambers in septic tanks feature effluent pumps that are actuated by float switches. Float switches are used in septic systems to activate alarms and to shut down and restart effluent pumps. It is possible for float switches that have been put incorrectly or carelessly to become stuck on other wires in the tank or become useless owing to debris in the tank. Sticking float switches fail to warn a homeowner that sewage is backing up into the house. 3ups or failing to switch off an effluent pump are unacceptable.

Septic tank floats should be examined for good operation on a regular basis, and this should be done every time septic tank maintenance is conducted.

Step 1

Remove the lid for the maintenance access hole from the tank and place it to one side.

Step 2

Look for electrical cables and other trash in the tank and note where they are. The wires connecting from the float switches to the pump’s standpipe should be firmly secured and should not obstruct the free movement of the floats in any manner.

Step 3

Reduce the height of the pump hook until it is below the float switch’s position.

Raising and lowering the float switch will allow you to determine whether an electrical wire or other debris is preventing it from moving.

Step 4

Ensure that the float is in its completely open position before bumping it. If the pump does not pump or the alarm does not sound, the float has to be bumped again. If the alarm is triggered or the pump is activated, the float should be replaced.

Step 5

Replace the access cover for the septic tank’s upkeep.

Warning

When working around sewage tanks, you should use caution. Don’t forget to put on your safety gear.

How to Troubleshoot Septic Float Switches

Septic tank alarms and float switches are included with your septic system if it employs a pump to transport wastewater from the tank and onto a drain field. Septic tank alarms and float switches are optional. When the float reaches an unacceptably high level, an alarm is activated to alert you that your tank may be on the verge of overflowing. It is possible for the float switch to fail and cause the alarm to ring even when the tank is not overflowing. Attempt solving the problem yourself first before calling a service expert for assistance.

Step 1

If the float’s alarm is sounding, turn off the alarm switch on the float. An overflow in the system or a defective float are both indicated by this condition.

Step 2

Anything plumbing-related in your home that discharges water into the septic system, such as the washing machine and dishwasher, must be turned off immediately.

Step 3

Reset the alarm by pressing the button on the wall. Wait between six and eight hours before turning on your water supply. If the alarm does not ring again after this length of time, it is likely that the problem is anything other than a sewage overflow.

Step 4

The float switch should not be turned off by checking the circuit breaker or the GFCI plug (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) for a trip. If moisture is allowed to enter the outlet, the GFCI plug will trip. When the circuit is tripped, a light will illuminate to show that it has happened. Attempt to reset the GFCI plug by pressing the button on the plug, or turn off and on the circuit breaker to reset the circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker or GFCI outlet trips again, this indicates that there is a problem with the wiring or that there is moisture in the circuit.

Step 5

Check to see if the pump is activated by pressing the on/off switch on the float switch. A dead switch or a defective pump might be to blame if this doesn’t work for you.

Step 6

Examine any exposed cables and wires to determine whether they have been damaged.

Choosing A Float Switch – Everything You Need to Know

Because there are so many float switches to pick from, finding the right one for your application may be quite difficult. This is mostly due to the sheer number of options available. We have approximately 20 different float switches in stock at Septic Solutions, and these are merely the most popular types among our customers. In this post, we will go over the process of selecting the appropriate float for your application in further depth. On our website, you will notice the floats branded “PUMP DOWN” or, more rarely, “PUMP UP,” which means that they are in the process of being pumped down.

  1. The floats labeled “PUMP DOWN” have contacts that are generally open, which means they are inactive when the float is in the lowered position and active when the float is elevated.
  2. The floats labeled “PUMP UP” are on the opposite side of the pool.
  3. These can be used for a variety of purposes, including tank filling and low level warnings.
  4. Pump Switches and Control Switches are the two primary types of floats that are used in the industry.

Pump switches are intended to be used to turn on and off a submersible pump, whilst control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel and are primarily intended to be used for high water alerts.

PUMP DUTY SWITCHES

Pump switches are devices that are used to regulate the functioning of a submersible water pump. They have a larger current carrying capacity than control switches. These are often wide angle switches, which means that they must be rotated 90 degrees in order to be switched to the “ON” or “OFF” position. When managing a pump, this is necessary since you must be able to pump out a wide range of water, and it also prevents the float from being stopped by turbulence in the water, which is undesirable.

  1. Because the float switch will be the conduit via which the power for the submersible pump will be sent, it must be capable of handling at least that amount of current.
  2. It will be necessary to make a choice on how the amperage float will be mounted once you have determined which amperage float will be required for your application.
  3. If you get a float switch that comes with a piggy-back connector, the installation is quite straightforward and straightforward.
  4. a) Float Switch Installation That is all there is to it; your pump will only activate when the float is in the proper position to permit it.
  5. Because floats are always two-wire devices, in order to install one on a pump, the float switch must be spliced into the “HOT” line coming from the power supply.
  6. The final choice you have is to choose between mercury and mechanical filtration.
  7. Mechanical switches are comprised of a ball bearing mounted on a track that rotates back and forth in both directions.
  8. Pump Float Switches may be purchased by clicking here.
See also:  How To Get Rid Of Saltwater Safely In A Septic Tank? (Question)

CONTROL DUTY SWITCHES

Control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel, and are mostly used for high and low level alerts. Low amperage and small angle are two characteristics that characterize these switches. When using narrow angle float switches, you must change the switch position by 10 degrees. As a result, they are extremely sensitive to changes in water level, making them ideal for use as high or low level alarms, respectively. Making a decision on which control switch to purchase is significantly less difficult.

  • Because it will be attached directly to a control panel or alarm box, no control switch will ever be supplied with a plug.
  • The “PUMP DOWN” variant will be utilized for notifications at the highest level.
  • To purchase a control float switch, please visit this page.
  • In the event that one of our floats is not suitable for your use, we have the capability of obtaining many more types and should be able to locate something suitable for your needs.

Furthermore, we can supply most of our floats with cords in a variety of lengths, including 10ft, 15ft, 20ft, 30ft, and 50 feet. If you have any concerns or would like to place a custom order for a float switch, please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132.

Does Your Septic System Require A New Pump?

A septic tank’s waste and sewage are evacuated from it and discharged into a drain field, either by gravity or with the assistance of a septic system lift pump. In most cases, a septic pump is not required if the waste can flow at a rate of at least two feet per second through the system using gravity alone. Pumps are typically required for septic tanks that are located lower than the drain field and for which gravity is unable to transport and/or force the effluent out of the tank due to its location.

Know If Your System Uses A Septic Effluent Pump Or Septic Grinder Pump

Knowing what sort of pump your septic system is equipped with is critical to the overall operation of the system. A septic effluent pump is a device that transfers waste from a septic tank to a drain field. A septic grinder pump is responsible for the grinding and movement of human waste and toilet paper. Septic tank businesses in Gainesville, FL such as Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service can help if you’re not sure what sort of pump the system is using or where it’s located in the system. Our professionals will identify the pump and check the septic system in order to notify you of the procedures that need to be taken in order to keep all components in proper operating order.

How Septic Pumps Work

A septic pump is a sort of submersible pump that is installed in either the last chamber of the septic tank or in a separate chamber outside the main tank of the system. As waste builds up in the chamber, it activates a float switch, which then activates the septic pump. After that, waste is forced up the outflow pipe and into the drain field by an impeller. Installing a septic tank pump alarm is an excellent strategy to avoid having to clean out your septic tank on a regular basis. One of our professionals will connect the float switch to an alarm panel, which will sound if the pump fails for any reason during the installation.

This alarm will ring and notify you if there is a sewage backup in your home.

Maintenance For A Septic Pump

The upkeep of a septic pump goes hand in hand with the upkeep of a septic system in its whole. Never drain or flush any of the following common home objects to avoid the need for emergency septic service and to ensure the pump’s long-term functionality:

  • Baby wipes
  • Cat litter
  • Fats, oils, and/or grease produced by or utilized in the preparation of meals
  • Dental floss
  • Personal hygiene products
  • And Q-tips or other cotton swabs are all recommended.

In addition, avoid using the garbage disposal because this can cause the septic tank to fill up more rapidly and force water into the tank, among other things. If there is an excessive amount of water entering the septic system, it can cause sediments to enter the septic pump, resulting in a probable blockage in either the pump or the drain field. If or when this occurs, contact Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service for prompt and dependable septic tank repairs.

Common Septic Pump Issues

Even with proper maintenance, a septic pump can develop a variety of problems over time, including the following:

Noise Or No Noise

There are occasions when it is possible to hear the septic pump operating within the chamber itself.

Do not hesitate to contact us for septic service if it appears that the pump is having difficulty or is failing to transport waste effectively.

Leaking Into The Septic Tank

The septic pump is equipped with a check valve, which provides a pressure gradient in order to keep the waste flowing through the pump and into the drainage system. Whenever the valve wears down or breaks, waste is forced back into the septic tank, causing the tank to overflow and back up into the pipes.

Faulty Float

Floats can become stuck open or closed, or they might become damaged as a result of material entering the septic tank. Depending on the extent of the damage, a professional from Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service may be able to remove the debris or may need to replace the float entirely.

Burnt Out Motor

If the motor within the septic pump burns out or fails, the pump will be unable to transfer waste, even if the energy is still being supplied to the device, since the waste would be trapped. In most cases, replacing the pump will address the problem.

Installing A New Septic Pump Or System

Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service will replace your septic tank if it is essential, and they will also install a new pump. Everything begins with an application, which is needed by the Florida Department of Health. We will always assist you in filling out the application and applying for any permissions that may be required. Our professionals will be pleased to walk you through the procedure and answer any questions you may have along the way.

Septic Tank Service

Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service can solve any septic issue, regardless of whether your sewage system currently has a pump or if you’re interested whether installing a pump will increase the system’s overall efficiency. When performing septic tank repairs in Gainesville, our specialists take into consideration the demands of the family or company. Call Jones PlumbingSeptic Tank Service immediately to make an appointment for septic service!

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Top Quality Float Switches and Water Tank Float Switches

Float switches are an essential component of your septic system; they control the operation of your septic pump and alert you when there is a problem, such as when the water level is too high. There are several distinct types of float switches, each of which performs a different function. We will go through this in more detail below. Alarms and pumps are controlled by control duty floats, which are not always directly connected to the pump in question. They are connected directly to the control panel, and the control panel has a relay that activates whatever functions are required.

  1. To summarize the action, the float rises, closing contacts close and this in turn activates the relay switch, which enables and takes on the load of whatever was previously switched on and off.
  2. The float switch is responsible for channeling the electrical charge that drives the pump.
  3. Pump floats are available in a variety of sizes.
  4. The old pump on the system would have drawn more amps as a result of its age; when pumps age, they begin to draw more amps, which is ultimately what causes them to break down.
  5. When added to an electrical circuit, float switches enable the sensing of fluid levels on their own without any external assistance from the circuit designer.
  6. A closed circuit is one in which electricity is able to travel through the circuit’s components and provide power to the devices in the circuit.
  7. Float switches are activated when fluid levels rise in conjunction with the rise in water level.

The upward orientation of a float switch will normally lead it to shut, although the direction in which a float switch closes will vary depending on the exact float switch being used.

The natural position of a float switch is in the position when it is hanging down.

When the fluid level in a septic system reaches a specific level, the system will normally close a circuit and activate a pump.

The typical position of a normally openfloat switch will cause a circuit to be opened while the switch is in the open position.

When the water level in the system is high, a usually open system will become a closed circuit.

When an excessive amount of effluent accumulates in the tank, a standard septic system will attempt to pump it out.

The closed circuit will activate the effluent pump, which will then raise the wastewater to the desired level once again.

When the fluid level is low, current will flow; when the fluid level is high, current will not flow.

See also:  How Far Should A Septic Tank Be Barried? (TOP 5 Tips)

It is possible to utilize this system when the user requires the fluid level in a system to be higher than a specified minimum height.

Mercury is the first sort of mechanism to be discussed.

Unlike the first sort of mechanism, the second type is more mechanical in character.

The ball will roll within the float switch as the level of the fluid changes within the switch.

Float switches are also available in two different configurations: wide angle and narrow angle.

Float switches of this sort can be utilized in situations where a moderate degree of variation in fluid level is acceptable or to be expected.

These sorts of float switches should be considered if the user wishes to keep a more steady fluid level throughout the process.

When the float switch is closed, the effluent pump will begin to circulate the water.

In this way, the level of effluent in your tank can be controlled without the need for the user to look inside of the tank to determine if the pump should be engaged.

It is possible that an effluent pump will fail, causing the level of wastewater in your tank to grow over permitted limits.

A faulty pump, on the other hand, will not empty your tank.

It is possible for the float switch to become stuck in the on position due to a steady current.

This is due to the fact that the float switch has been destroyed and is still instructing the pump to empty a tank that is already empty.

When you purchase a new effluent pump, it is recommended that you replace the float switch to ensure that your system continues to operate properly for a longer period of time.

Float switches that are used in conjunction with a timer may be present.

To adjust the fluid level, an array of float switches, with an override switch, and an alert may be used in some systems. When installing a septic system, it is critical to understand the amount and types of float switches that will be required.

  • Float switches are used to control the operation of various devices dependent on the amount of fluid in the tank. Determine if a typically open or normally closed float switch is required. Be sure to determine if you want a wide angle or small angle floating switch. When you replace your effluent pump, you should also replace the float switch.

Float Switches for Sewage Pumps and Septic Tanks

While the majority of new houses and dwellings in the United States and the United Kingdom are built with sewage systems that are connected to their city or town’s main sewer line, some older properties or those in more rural areas may still rely on a septic tank to handle their waste. If you live in one of these residences, a high-quality float switch for your sewage pump is an absolute must-have item for you. In a working septic tank alarm, the most significant operational characteristic is the presence of float switches, which alert you when your sewage pump is not running correctly, resulting in backups and overflows.

Mechanical Sump Switches

Singleball float switches are a traditional design that provide basic on/off functionality in either pump up or pump down configurations. They are suitable for both consumer and commercial industrial applications. They can also be used for a variety of other purposes, such as basement sump pumps.

Horizontal Float Switches

The use of an aside-mounted float switch for switches and alarms that may be fitted into new septic tanks may be a preferable alternative. These switches are routed through the tank’s side, rising and sinking in response to changes in water level to either an open or closed state.

Submersible Sensors

A downhole submersible model may be the ideal solution for regulating sewage pumps or septic tank alarms in very deep sewage tanks or in big commercial models, depending on the application. These sensors, such as theFT60, are capable of continuous level measurement rather than basic point-level measurement and are excellent for depths greater than 10 feet. They may be installed in tiny areas and are suited for depths greater than 10 feet.

Why do you need a sewage pump and alarm?

Septic tanks are subterranean systems that are usually positioned behind or to the side of a house or building. Upon entering the tank through an intake, all liquid and solid waste from the home automatically separates into three layers: solid “sludge” on the bottom, clarified water in the middle, and oily “scum” on the top. The cleared water is released into a drain field or a specified surface water body, depending on its location. In order to break down the residual solids, special bacteria are used.

It is for this reason that liquid level measurement is so critical.

Special Concerns for the United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom, particularly in England and Wales, home septic tanks are strictly controlled by law. Property owners who have a septic tank or sewage treatment system are required to register these facilities or get an exemption from the Environmental Protection Agency. “Septic tanks can be an efficient means of dealing with minor volumes of sewage,” according to the House of Commons. When they are positioned in sensitive regions or are constructed and operated in a substandard manner, they can pollute water sources and the environment.” Drainage systems that discharge directly into regions such as open groundwater or protected zones are subject to permit requirements.

Remember to keep these severe government restrictions in mind while installing a new septic system or installing a sewage pump or small sewage treatment plant (link).

Get in touch today!

It is not necessary to be sophisticated to manage basin mounted sump and sewage pumps in commercial and institutional settings. The fact that a modest fractional horsepower pump comes with an on/off float switch positioned on the side of the pump is something we don’t even consider in residential installations. Even when the system is larger, we can still rely on the standard pump control to function well. All that remains is for us to decide.

Specifications are Sometimes Too Messy

The standards for sump and sewage systems should be straightforward. I frequently come across specifications that are plainly the result of alternative recommendations being added to existing standard standards. Consequently, a specification that is not explicit may result in selections that are poor or inaccurate in nature. If you have a duplex pump, you must decide whether to utilize three or four floats in the basin to regulate the flow.

Simplex SumpSewage Control in Buildings

A single float with an on-off range of only a few inches might be used to control a very small flow rate, such as that found in a household sump. The use of a on float and an off float is required in a bigger simplex pumping system with more storage capacity. The distance between each of them is determined by the amount of volume necessary to achieve the pump’s minimum run duration. A high-level alert would signal that the pump was unable to keep up with the demands of the system. This simplex system would necessitate the use of three floats: Pump off – Pump back on – high level alert (if applicable).

Duplex SumpSewage Four-Float Control

If we apply the same reasoning to the duplex system, we will need four floats in order to function. Many of the specs that we encounter call for four floats. Pumps are turned off; the lead pump is turned on; the lag pump is turned on; and the high-level alarm is turned on. This is going to work perfectly. Most of the time, the pumps are equipped with an alternator that automatically shifts which pump serves as the lead pump. If there is an unusually high increase in demand, both pumps will be activated.

  1. Creating a storage difference between the lag float and the alarm float is another advantage of using a four-float system, as shown in the diagram below.
  2. In general, we recommend placing the alarm float 6″ below the lowest intake as a “rule of thumb.” The lag pump float should be placed 6″ below the alarm float.
  3. Neither the lead nor lag pumps have succeeded in pumping out the basin at this stage.
  4. You should specify in your specification that if you employ a four-float system, the lag pump operation shall result in a pump run status contact closure to the BMS.

This should be treated as an alert situation by the building management system (BMS) in place. A lead pump failure will not be indicated in the absence of this action.

Duplex SumpSewage Three-Float Control

Take a look at the starting panel, which has three floats as well as an automated alternator with lead-lag management. Pumps will be turned off, the lead pump will be turned on, the lag pump will be turned on, and a high-level alert will sound. As previously stated, the pumps will alternate, and both pumps will run in a surge condition at the same time. When the lag pump is activated, an alert will ring. This might be a symptom of a lead pump failing to function properly. When this happens, the system will run on the lag pump.

  1. It is obvious that the alert must be responded and that the situation must be resolved.
  2. The distinction is between a planned service call and an emergency call at midnight.
  3. Are the sump and sewage pumps being connected to a building management system (BMS)?
  4. If you do not want to use the BMS system, you may use a three-float system instead.
  5. Check out the R.
  6. Deppmann plumbing, sump, and sewage website page to see and apply this straightforward specification paragraph.

Septic 3 Float System – Is this how it’s supposed to work?

Greetings, fellas. I live in Pennsylvania and have a raised mound septic system. A pump pushes the effluent upward into a 500-gallon dosing tank in my septic tank, which is located at the top of the sand mound. The system is comprised of three floats. The top float activates the alarm, and the center float activates the pump to start it. The bottom float is visible in the tank water, and I can see it floating. I was under the assumption that when the middle float floated upward and turned on, it would activate the pump, which would then remain operational until the bottom float was turned off (stopped floating).

Use a stick to raise the center pump, which then turns on, and even if you drop the middle pump, it will keep pumping until it gets to the level of the lowest bottom float.) However, I went in there only for the sake of checking the system, like I do every year, and discovered that it does not operate in this manner.

The pump kicked into action.

I believe that the bottom float is floating upward, as it should be.

Is my system up and running correctly? What is the normal operation of a three-float system? Wanting to obtain some peace of mind, or calling someone out and having them check it out if this is genuinely not a healthy situation Thank you to everyone.

Sump Pump High Water Alarms, Float Switch, Septic Tank Control Panels, Pump Floats

You may place an order online or call our sales department at 1-877-925-5132 for help.

Observer 500 SerieS Outdoor High Water Alarm15′ or 30′ mechanical alarm float, 6′ Power Cord

It is used to monitor liquid levels in sump and sewage basins, septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and other similar applications. Easy installation is made possible by the inclusion of a 6-foot power wire and outlet. Specifications of the product

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  • 6 foot power cord with plug for easy installation Horn mute and alarm test switch are included. Primary voltage is 120 volts, secondary voltage is 12 volts, and the frequency is 60 hertz. 6.5 watts maximum in alarm status
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Click To View Larger Image EASY INSTALLATIONBox Dimensions: 5.5′ x 3.75′ x 3.75’Observer 500 Specifications Observer 500 Installation Manual

All high water alarms are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

VersAlarm™ I/OOutdoor High Water Alarm15′ or 30′ Mechanical alarm Float, 6′ Power Cord

Water level monitoring is accomplished with the VersAlarm I/O series High Water Alarm, which is utilized in sump and sewage basins, septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and a variety of other applications. Easy installation is made possible by the inclusion of a 6-foot power wire and outlet. Enclosure that has been UL listed. Specifications of the product

  • With a big light and a loud trumpet, this indoor/outdoor alarm will keep you safe. Mechanical alarm float with pipe mount for 15′ or 30′ lengths of pipe. Power cord with plug for simple installation
  • 6′ power cord with plug
  • Electrical cable connections that are watertight are supplied. It is possible to drill and install to satisfy specific requirements
  • There is no electrical plug included with this alarm. 120 volts, 5 amps maximum, 60 hertz
  • UL-listed Nema 4X thermoplastic enclosure that is waterproof
  • THREE-YEAR WARRANTY WITHOUT DEALEXTENDING
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Availability: IN STOCKWith 15′ Mechanical Switch Item8040
Click To View Larger Image ITEM QUALIFIES FOR WHALE OF A DEAL.CLICK HERETO SEE WHAT IT MEANS! Box Dimensions: 5.0′ x 5.3′ x 2.25’VersAlarm I/O Specifications

You may place an order online or call our sales department at 1-877-925-5132 for help.

Observer 400 Series Outdoor High Water Alarm15′ Mechanical alarm Float, No Power Cord

It is used to monitor liquid levels in sump and sewage basins, septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and other similar applications. Enclosure that has been UL listed. Specifications of the product

  • With a big light and a loud trumpet, this indoor/outdoor alarm will keep you safe. With a 15-foot mechanical alarm float and a tie strap
  • Auxiliary Dry Contacts at 120VAC
  • The electrical box connections are not included. It is possible to drill and install to satisfy specific requirements
  • There is no electrical plug included with this alarm. It has to be wired. 120 VAC, 5 amps maximum, 60 Hz
  • Nema 3R waterproof thermoplastic enclosure that is UL approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem10A400
Click To View Larger Image Box Dimensions: 6.5′ x 4.5′ x 3’Observer 400 Specifications Observer 400 Installation Manual

You may place an order online or call our sales department at 1-877-925-5132 for help.

VersAlarm™ I/OOutdoor High Water Alarm20′ Mechanical alarm Float, No Power Cord

Water level monitoring is accomplished with the VersAlarm I/O series High Water Alarm, which is utilized in sump and sewage basins, septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and a variety of other applications. Enclosure that has been UL listed. Specifications of the product

  • With a big light and a loud trumpet, this indoor/outdoor alarm will keep you safe. Mechanical alarm float with pipe mount, 20′ in length
  • The electrical box connections are not included. It is possible to drill and install to satisfy specific requirements
  • There is no electrical plug included with this alarm. It has to be wired. 120 VAC, 5 amps maximum, 60 Hz
  • Nema 4X waterproof thermoplastic enclosure that is UL approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem7032
Click To View Larger Image Box Dimensions: 5.0′ x 5.3′ x 2.25’VersAlarm I/O Specifications

With a big light and a loud trumpet, this indoor/outdoor alarm will go off. Pipe mount for mechanical alarm float 20 feet in length. It is not included with the electrical box connections. Specific requirements can be met by drilling and installing custom-made components. A connector for connecting the alarm to a power source is not included. It is necessary to connect the system in place. NEMA 4X waterproof thermoplastic enclosure; 120 VAC, 5 amps maximum, 60 Hz; UL listed

BIO-HWAP SINGLE Light Control PanelHIGH WATER ALARM WITH multiple circuits

This control panel, which has many circuits, is used to detect rising water levels. You can use several circuits to operate a submersible pump that is not connected to the high water alert circuit at the same time. Specifications of the product

  • Pumpalarm circuits are protected by circuit breakers
  • An external run/test/mute switch is required. Audible alarms that are externally mounted
  • A 360-degree red alarm light
  • An external loud buzzer with a high decibel volume
  • The enclosure is a Nema 4X. Listing of UL 508A panels
  • Internal wiring that is color coded
  • Floats are available for purchase separately.
Availability: IN STOCKItem50B010
Click To View Larger ImageBox Dimensions: 10.25′ x 8.5′ x 4’Floats Sold Separately! Click Here! Outside View of the Control BoxNeed Help? Watch This Video! Features and Specifications

Do you require assistance in selecting a high water alarm? Please contact us at 1-877-925-5132 toll free.

Observer 100 SeriesPedestal Alarm Outdoor High Water Alarm With float switch

In addition to monitoring liquid levels in sump and sewage basins, as well as septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and other storage containers, the Observer 100 Series Pedestal High Water Alarm is also employed in other applications. The pedestal may either be fitted over a 4×4 post or it can be inserted straight into the ground to complete the installation. Specifications of the product

  • Alarm on a pedestal with a big light and a loud trumpet
  • Mechanical alarm float switch (20′ in length)
  • A 120-volt outlet for the submersible pump
  • Battery backup of 9 volts
  • 120 volts, 5 amps maximum, 60 hertz
  • Dry contacts for auxiliary purposes
  • The enclosure is made of rugged Nema 3R watertight material and is intended for outdoor use. Limited Warranty of Two Years
Item10A100
Click To View Larger Image Dimensions: 6′ W x 35′ H x 6′ DEASILY INSTALLS ON 4×4 POST or directly into the groundObserver 100 Specifications Observer 100 Installation Manual

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Power Post 4x Pedestal AlarmOutdoor High Water Alarm With float

The Power Post 4X pedestal alarm and pump connection center is intended for use with a septic tank or pump tank to monitor levels in the tank.

The Power Post 4X is equipped with a high-water alert as well as a power connection for a submersible pump, among other features. Specifications of the product

  • Pedestal with a 48-inch height and an alarm for excessive water
  • Mechanical Alarm Float Switch with Pipe Mount
  • Female Plug for Submersible Pump Connection
  • Alarm Test and Mute Switch
  • 20ft Mechanical Alarm Float Switch with Pipe Mount
  • A red polycarbonate beacon with an audible buzzer (100 dB at 10 feet)
  • A NEMA 4X watertight enclosure that is UL 508 approved
  • 120VAC, 60Hz
  • And a three-year warranty are included.
Availability: IN STOCKItem7115
Click To View Larger Image Box Dimensions: 48′ x 5′ x 5’Features andSpecifications

We have the greatest collection of septic goods on the internet, with over 700 different options!

Observer 200 SeriesIndoor High Water Alarm 15′ Mechanical Float, 6’Power Cord

It is used to monitor liquid levels in sump and sewage basins, septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and other similar applications. Easy installation is made possible by the inclusion of a 6-foot power wire and outlet. This product is strictly for indoor usage! Specifications of the product

  • Indoor alarm box with audible and visible trumpet
  • Float with mechanical alarm 15′ in length
  • A 9V battery backup
  • A power wire with a connector that is 6 feet long. Dry contacts for auxiliary purposes
  • Terminal connectors that snap together in a flash
Availability: IN STOCKItem10A200
Click To View Larger Image EASY INSTALLATIONBox Dimensions: 6′ x 3.75’x 2.5′ Observer 200 Specifications Observer 200 Installation Manual

To speak with a member of our customer care team, please call us toll free at 1-877-925-5132.

Versalarm™Indoor High Water Alarm 15′ Mechanical Float, 6’Power Cord

Using the VersAlarm series High Water Alarm, you can keep track of liquid levels in sump and sewage basins, septic tanks and aeration systems, cisterns, and a variety of other applications. Easy installation is made possible by the inclusion of a 6-foot power wire and outlet. This product is strictly for indoor usage! Specifications of the product

  • With an audible and visible trumpet, this indoor alarm box may be set off at any time. Float with mechanical alarm 15′ in length
  • A 9V battery backup
  • A power wire with a connector that is 6 feet long. Dry contacts for auxiliary purposes
  • Warranty for three years
Availability: IN STOCKItem7001
Click To View Larger Image Box Dimensions: 6.0′ x 4.0’x 2.0′ VersAlarm™ Specifications

Septic Solutions provides fast and free same-day shipping on all high water alarm products.

Versalarm™ SUMP PITIndoor High Water Alarm WITH WATERSPOTTER™ PROBE FOR USE IN SUMPS

In sump and sewage basins, the VersAlarm series High Water Alarm is used to monitor the amount of liquid in the basin. When the water level on the Waterspotter Probe reaches the sensors on the probe, the buzzer and light on the probe will be triggered. When compared to a float switch, the Waterspotter Probe takes far less area to function. Specifications of the product

  • With an audible and visible trumpet, this indoor alarm box may be set off at any time. WaterSpotterTM Probe is mounted to a pipe and has a 15-foot cord with a 9-volt battery backup. a power wire with a plug measuring 6 feet in length
  • Dry contacts for auxiliary purposes
  • Warranty for three years
Availability: IN STOCKItem7002
Click To View Larger Image Box Dimensions: 6.0′ x 4.0’x 2.0′ VersAlarm™ Specifications WaterSpotter™ Probe Diagram

To speak with a member of our customer care team, please call us toll free at 1-877-925-5132.

Versalarm™ FLOOD SENSORIndoor High Water Alarm WITH WATERSPOTTER™ FLOOD SENSOR

The VersAlarm series High Water Alarm is intended to warn people of impending flooding before it occurs. When the water level on the Waterspotter FloodSensor reaches the sensors on the device, the buzzer and light on the device will be triggered. This device is used to detect floodwater around sump pits, washing machines, and water heaters, among other things. Specifications of the product

  • With an audible and visible trumpet, this indoor alarm box may be set off at any time. WaterSpotterTM Sensor has a 15-foot cord, a 9-volt battery backup, and a 6-foot power wire with a connector
  • Dry contacts for auxiliary purposes
  • Warranty for three years
Availability: IN STOCKItem7003
Click To View Larger Image Box Dimensions: 6.0′ x 4.0’x 2.0′ VersAlarm™ Specifications

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Septic Pump Components

Septic tank alarms and float switches are required if your septic system is equipped with a pump to take wastewater from the tank and discharge it onto a drainage field. When the amount of water in the tank rises over an undesirable level, the float rises with it. If the float flips, an alarm will sound, alerting you that your toilet may overflow if the problem is not treated immediately. It is possible for the float switch to fail and cause the alarm to ring even when the tank is not overflowing.

Troubleshooting probable float switch difficulties includes the following steps:

  1. Check to see if the pump is activated by pressing the on/off switch on the float switch. You may have a faulty pump, or you may have a dead switch
  2. Whichever is the case, you should replace it. Make a visual inspection of all exposed cable or wires for signs of damage. It is possible to connect the pump directly to a power source, bypassing the switch, in some cases. You, on the other hand, are now running the pump in manual mode. The pump will need to be unplugged in order to be turned off, or else it will burn out. If the pump does not turn on when the switch is bypassed and there is power to the pump, there might be a number of various reasons for this. This will be a problem that will need to be resolved. Make a phone call to Lentz Wastewater.

CONTROL PANEL

Pumps of various sizes are controlled through the use of control panels. Simplex Control Panels are used to regulate the operation of a single submersible pump. Simplex panels are equipped with a high water alarm, fuses for the alarm circuit, and circuit breakers, among other features. Residential and business locations with a single pump can benefit from these control panels. Duplex Control Panels are used to regulate the operation of two submersible pumps at the same time. High water alarms, fuses, and circuit breakers are all included in these panels.

Throughout the day, Time Dosing Control Panels send wastewater to a secondary system through the use of timers. The use of a cycled timer in conjunction with time dosing makes it feasible to distribute to a secondary system. Parts of the Control Panel:

The usage of a Control Panel is common in pump applications when automated electrical cycling of the pump is sought for extra protection, such as in home or commercial settings. It is necessary to have a control panel for any system that uses a non-automatic pump. The pump control box’s primary function is to safeguard both the pump and the pump motor.

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