How Does A Septic Tank Float Switch Work? (Best solution)

A float switch detects the level of a liquid in a tank or container. It floats on top of the liquid surface and acts as a mechanical switch as the liquid level goes up or down. They control devices like pumps (pump water in or out), valves (open or close inlet/outlets), or alarms to notify users.

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  • A float switch works to detect the level of liquid in a tank by using a float, magnet, and reed switch system that automatically opens and closes when water levels rise and fall inside the tank. Once the dry contacts are opened or closed, they will send an electrical signal to set off a water level alarm. Why is my septic tank alarm going off?

How do I know if my float switch is bad?

If it is, try this easy fix: check whether an object is preventing the overfill float from moving up and down freely. If the float is stuck in its highest position, the fill valve won’t let water into the tub. If that doesn’t take care of it, the overfill float switch or water inlet valve may be broken.

How does septic alarm float work?

A float switch inside the tank tells the pump when to come on, and a separate float switch operates an alarm that comes on when the water level exceeds a preset minimum. Aerobic septic systems also need alarms, even if the ground doesn’t slope.

How does an automatic float switch work?

A float switch works to detect the level of liquid in a tank by using a float, magnet, and reed switch system that automatically opens and closes when water levels rise and fall inside the tank. Once the dry contacts are opened or closed, they will send an electrical signal to set off a water level alarm.

How do you test a float switch?

Attach the MultiMeter leads to the float switch wires. The Multimeter should be set to the Ohms. The MultiMeter should read zero when the float hangs in the down position. Lifting the float will change the zero to one.

Why is my float switch not working?

When it comes to the failure of this type of float switch, it generally comes down to certain common causes. These causes include the incorrect configuration of the switch, poor maintenance, using a float switch that is not designed for the purpose or using a float switch that is not properly rated for the application.

Where is the float switch on a septic system?

For switches and alarms that can be installed into new septic tanks, a side-mounted float switch might be a better option. These switches are run through the side of the tank, rising and falling with water levels to an open or closes position.

Why do you consider float switch as automatic switch?

An example of this would be when a Normally Open float switch turns OFF an emptying pump when the liquid falls below the level of the switch. If a certain liquid level must be maintained, a float switch is great for automatic pump control and alarms. This creates flooding, pump failure, or both.

How long does a float switch last?

If you have an automatic pump with an integral float switch, the switch assembly is malfunctioning, and the switch, switch arm, and case gasket should be replaced. The average switch life is 4-7 years, but it may vary depending on the application.

How do you check a float?

Check if a Float value is equivalent to an Integer value

  1. Initialize a variable, say X, to store the integer value of N.
  2. Convert the value float value of N to integer and store it in X.
  3. Finally, check if (N – X) > 0 or not. If found to be true, then print “NO”.
  4. Otherwise, print “YES”.

How many types of float switches are there?

There are two types of float switches: stem-mounted float switches and cable-suspended float switches.

How Sewage Pumps Work with Float Switches

Most of the time when you flush your toilet, you don’t think about where the waste goes or how it’s transported to a sewage treatment plant. This, on the other hand, is something that has a significant impact on your daily activities. It is impossible to use gravity to transfer trash in residences that are located below septic or sewage systems. In this case, the role of the sewage pump is crucial.

What is a Sewage Pump?

Sewage pumps are pumps that are used to transport sewage liquids and particles from one area to another. They are also known as sewage disposal pumps. Sewage is normally pumped from the basement of the home into the main sewer line in the event of a residence. Sewage pumps are available in two configurations: manual and automated. Manual sewage pumps must be switched on and off on a regular basis, albeit they are generally not advised due to the danger of sewage overflowing. Automatic sewage pumps, on the other hand, work with the assistance of a float switch to operate.

How Sewage Pumps Work?

Centrifugal pumps are used in sewage treatment. Aside from that, they are carefully built so that particles may travel through them without fouling up the pump itself. Pumps work by rotating their impellers, which generate enough pressure to force water into the impeller and then out of it through the discharge pipe. When you switch on your pump, the motor turns your impeller. You could be curious about how the sewage pump determines when to pump sewage in the first place, or how the sewage tank avoids overflowing.

In response to an increase in the amount of sewage in the tank, this switch floats higher in the tank.

Float Switches for Sewage Pumps

The float switch is one of the most critical components of a sewage pump since it is responsible for allowing the pump to actually begin pumping. It is typical to see the FN20 Mechanical Sump Switch in residential applications such as sump pumps and basement pumps. It is also possible to utilize this sump float switch for septic tanks and ejector pumps in addition to sump tanks.

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Because there are so many float switches to pick from, finding the right one for your application may be quite difficult. This is mostly due to the sheer number of options available. We have approximately 20 different float switches in stock at Septic Solutions, and these are merely the most popular types among our customers. In this post, we will go over the process of selecting the appropriate float for your application in further depth. On our website, you will notice the floats branded “PUMP DOWN” or, more rarely, “PUMP UP,” which means that they are in the process of being pumped down.

  1. The floats labeled “PUMP DOWN” have contacts that are generally open, which means they are inactive when the float is in the lowered position and active when the float is elevated.
  2. The floats labeled “PUMP UP” are on the opposite side of the pool.
  3. These can be used for a variety of purposes, including tank filling and low level warnings.
  4. Pump Switches and Control Switches are the two primary types of floats that are used in the industry.

Pump switches are intended to be used to turn on and off a submersible pump, whilst control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel and are primarily intended to be used for high water alerts.

PUMP DUTY SWITCHES

Pump switches are devices that are used to regulate the functioning of a submersible water pump. They have a larger current carrying capacity than control switches. These are often wide angle switches, which means that they must be rotated 90 degrees in order to be switched to the “ON” or “OFF” position. When managing a pump, this is necessary since you must be able to pump out a wide range of water, and it also prevents the float from being stopped by turbulence in the water, which is undesirable.

  • Because the float switch will be the conduit via which the power for the submersible pump will be sent, it must be capable of handling at least that amount of current.
  • It will be necessary to make a choice on how the amperage float will be mounted once you have determined which amperage float will be required for your application.
  • If you get a float switch that comes with a piggy-back connector, the installation is quite straightforward and straightforward.
  • a) Float Switch Installation That is all there is to it; your pump will only activate when the float is in the proper position to permit it.
  • Because floats are always two-wire devices, in order to install one on a pump, the float switch must be spliced into the “HOT” line coming from the power supply.
  • The final choice you have is to choose between mercury and mechanical filtration.
  • Mechanical switches are comprised of a ball bearing mounted on a track that rotates back and forth in both directions.
  • Pump Float Switches may be purchased by clicking here.

CONTROL DUTY SWITCHES

Control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel, and are mostly used for high and low level alerts. Low amperage and small angle are two characteristics that characterize these switches. When using narrow angle float switches, you must change the switch position by 10 degrees. As a result, they are extremely sensitive to changes in water level, making them ideal for use as high or low level alarms, respectively. Making a decision on which control switch to purchase is significantly less difficult.

  • Because it will be attached directly to a control panel or alarm box, no control switch will ever be supplied with a plug.
  • The “PUMP DOWN” variant will be utilized for notifications at the highest level.
  • To purchase a control float switch, please visit this page.
  • In the event that one of our floats is not suitable for your use, we have the capability of obtaining many more types and should be able to locate something suitable for your needs.

Furthermore, we can supply most of our floats with cords in a variety of lengths, including 10ft, 15ft, 20ft, 30ft, and 50 feet. If you have any concerns or would like to place a custom order for a float switch, please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132.

Septic Tank Float Switches – For Pumps & Control Panels

Septic Solutions has a large selection of float switches for septic tanks and lift stations to meet your needs. Pump duty float switches are designed to regulate a submersible pump, automatically turning it on and off based on the amount of liquid in the pump tank inside the pump. Control duty float switches are designed to be connected directly to a control panel in order to inform the control panel when to turn on and off the pump, or to signal the high level or low level alarm based on the liquid level in your tank.

Pump duty switches and control duty switches are available in both mechanical and mercury activated configurations.

Pump duty float switches are designed to regulate a submersible pump, automatically turning it on and off based on the amount of liquid in the pump tank inside the pump.

Control duty float switches are also known as control duty float switches.

CHOOSING THE CORRECT SEPTIC TANK FLOAT SWITCH

Pump switches are devices that are used to regulate the functioning of a submersible water pump. They have a larger current carrying capacity than control switches. These are often wide angle switches, which means that they must be rotated 90 degrees in order to be switched to the “ON” or “OFF” position. When managing a pump, this is necessary since you must be able to pump out a wide range of water, and it also prevents the float from being stopped by turbulence in the water, which is undesirable.

  1. Because the float switch will be the conduit via which the power for the submersible pump will be sent, it must be capable of handling at least that amount of current.
  2. It will be necessary to make a choice on how the amperage float will be mounted once you have determined which amperage float will be required for your application.
  3. If you get a float switch that comes with a piggy-back connector, the installation is quite straightforward and straightforward.
  4. a) Float Switch Installation That is all there is to it; your pump will only activate when the float is in the proper position to permit it.
  5. Because floats are always two-wire devices, in order to install one on a pump, the float switch must be spliced into the “HOT” line coming from the power supply.
  6. The final choice you have is to choose between mercury and mechanical filtration.
  7. Mechanical switches are comprised of a ball bearing mounted on a track that rotates back and forth in both directions.

Even though mercury switches are supposed to be more dependable, they are not permitted to be used in some places (see our website for more information) and are only available in 13-amp configurations.

CONTROL DUTY FLOAT SWITCHES

Control switches are intended to be used in conjunction with a control panel, and are mostly used for high and low level alerts. Low amperage and small angle are two characteristics that characterize these switches. When using narrow angle float switches, you must change the switch position by 10 degrees. As a result, they are extremely sensitive to changes in water level, making them ideal for use as high or low level alarms, respectively. Making a decision on which control switch to purchase is significantly less difficult.

See also:  How To Replace Septic Tank Drainage Dictches? (Question)

Because it will be attached directly to a control panel or alarm box, no control switch will ever be supplied with a plug.

The “PUMP DOWN” variant will be utilized for notifications at the highest level.

Troubleshooting a Sticking Float in a Septic Tank

Pump chambers in septic tanks feature effluent pumps that are actuated by float switches. Float switches are used in septic systems to activate alarms and to shut down and restart effluent pumps. It is possible for float switches that have been put incorrectly or carelessly to become stuck on other wires in the tank or become useless owing to debris in the tank. Sticking float switches fail to warn a homeowner that sewage is backing up into the house. 3ups or failing to switch off an effluent pump are unacceptable.

Septic tank floats should be examined for good operation on a regular basis, and this should be done every time septic tank maintenance is conducted.

Step 1

Remove the lid for the maintenance access hole from the tank and place it to one side.

Step 2

Look for electrical cables and other trash in the tank and note where they are. The wires connecting from the float switches to the pump’s standpipe should be firmly secured and should not obstruct the free movement of the floats in any manner.

Step 3

Reduce the height of the pump hook until it is below the float switch’s position. Raising and lowering the float switch will allow you to determine whether an electrical wire or other debris is preventing it from moving.

Step 4

Ensure that the float is in its completely open position before bumping it. If the pump does not pump or the alarm does not sound, the float has to be bumped again. If the alarm is triggered or the pump is activated, the float should be replaced.

Step 5

Replace the access cover for the septic tank’s upkeep.

Warning

When working around sewage tanks, you should use caution. Don’t forget to put on your safety gear.

How to Troubleshoot Septic Float Switches

Septic tank alarms and float switches are included with your septic system if it employs a pump to transport wastewater from the tank and onto a drain field. Septic tank alarms and float switches are optional. When the float reaches an unacceptably high level, an alarm is activated to alert you that your tank may be on the verge of overflowing. It is possible for the float switch to fail and cause the alarm to ring even when the tank is not overflowing.

Attempt solving the problem yourself first before calling a service expert for assistance. Consult your unique float switch user manual for precise information on where to locate the various components.

Step 1

If the float’s alarm is sounding, turn off the alarm switch on the float. An overflow in the system or a defective float are both indicated by this condition.

Step 2

Anything plumbing-related in your home that discharges water into the septic system, such as the washing machine and dishwasher, must be turned off immediately.

Step 3

Reset the alarm by pressing the button on the wall. Wait between six and eight hours before turning on your water supply. If the alarm does not ring again after this length of time, it is likely that the problem is anything other than a sewage overflow.

Step 4

The float switch should not be turned off by checking the circuit breaker or the GFCI plug (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) for a trip. If moisture is allowed to enter the outlet, the GFCI plug will trip. When the circuit is tripped, a light will illuminate to show that it has happened. Attempt to reset the GFCI plug by pressing the button on the plug, or turn off and on the circuit breaker to reset the circuit breaker. If the circuit breaker or GFCI outlet trips again, this indicates that there is a problem with the wiring or that there is moisture in the circuit.

Step 5

Check to see if the pump is activated by pressing the on/off switch on the float switch. A dead switch or a defective pump might be to blame if this doesn’t work for you.

Step 6

Examine any exposed cables and wires to determine whether they have been damaged.

Septic Tank Float Switch: Functions, Types & Problems

What exactly is a septic tank float switch, and what function does it play in the treatment of wastewater? A septic system, as its name implies, is comprised of a number of components that must all operate together in order for the system to function properly. The septic tank (which has multiple components as well), the drain field and drain pipes, and the plumbing system, among other things, are examples of components. All of these components, no matter how insignificant, play critical roles in ensuring that operations run smoothly.

You’ll have to stick around to find out the answers to any queries you have concerning this particular component.

An further topic we’ll look into is how to solve similar problems when they occur in the future.

Functions of A Septic Tank Float Switch

Some readers may be able to figure out what this item is all about just by looking at its name alone. No need to be concerned or embarrassed if you have no understanding what this is about. There is nothing to be embarrassed about. Isn’t it true that we’re all here to learn? Let’s get into the specifics without further ado. Float switches, in their most basic form, are sensors that signal to your pump when it is essential to turn on or off. It is necessary for the water level to have reached a certain level in order for the pump to be activated.

Take the weight of the world off your shoulders with this critical function. It is not necessary to keep track of when a pump should be turned on or off. All of this is carried out on an automated basis while you go about your everyday tasks.

Types Of Septic Tank Float Switches

There are options when it comes to choosing a more appropriate septic tank float switch for your use. Some of the main variants include submersible sensors, pump duty floats, mechanical sump switches, control duty floats, and horizontal float switches. To better understand each of these, it’s necessary to further explain how they work however brief it is.

Submersible Sensors

Submersible sensors are a sort of septic tank float switch that is most commonly used in deep sewage tanks. One of the most advantageous characteristics of submersible sensors is their ability to fit into virtually any place. To put it another way, this float switch version is suitable for tight places. It is also advantageous to use a submersible sensor since it allows you to obtain continuous level data, as opposed to other types of sensors that only provide point-level observations. Is this, therefore, the greatest septic tank float switch currently available?

Mechanical Sump Switches

Mechanical sump switches are also referred to as ball float switches in some circles. This sort of septic tank float switch may be found in a variety of applications, including basement sump pumps and sump pumps. Mechanical sump switches are designed to perform a simple set of functions. Or, to put it another way, the on/off operation or functionality of this septic tank float switch variation is straightforward. In addition, this float switch may be used to initiate the pumping of wastewater at different rates.

Horizontal Float Switches

The design of the horizontal float switch varies depending on where it is put or positioned on the circuit board. They’re positioned within the septic tank’s walls and rise and fall in response to the amount of sewage present. Because of this movement, it is simple to regulate the water level within the tank.

Septic Tank Float Switches are Important for the Following Reason…

The septic system, by its very design, provides a crucial function in the treatment of waste water. During the course of a day, when wastewater is discharged into this holding facility, the septic tank allows it to separate into three distinct layers, which are: scum (at the top), effluent (in the middle), and scum (at the bottom). Effluent that has accumulated in the septic tank must now either be evacuated or pumped to a drain field or surface water. A critical component, such as the float switch, must be fitted in order to guarantee that the levels are properly controlled.

When backups occur, the impact of a defective float switch is now felt to the fullest extent.

Common Issues Associated With Float Switch Failure

Float switches fail for a variety of reasons, three of which are discussed here.

The existence of moving parts, poor maintenance practices, and selecting the incorrect device or switch for your septic tank are all examples of these issues. Any one of these factors is sufficient to generate issues in its own right.

Presence of Moving Parts

There are certain float switches for septic tanks that contain moving parts. While they may initially operate admirably, the corrosive and toxic nature of the septic tank environment eventually causes them to fail. Consequently, the moving parts become blocked, and the system fails as a result of the accumulation of debris.

Poor Maintenance Habits

When it comes to keeping your float switch in excellent operating order, preventative maintenance is critical. As a result, inadequate maintenance practices will do nothing to assist you in keeping this critical septic tank component operational. Habits of failure result from a pattern of continuous carelessness or inadequate maintenance. Important to remember is that the failure of a single system component, such as the septic tank float switch, can result in extensive damage to the system. This is a circumstance you’d want to stay as far away from as you possibly can.

This technique include identifying any defects that might have an impact on critical components such as the septic tank’s float switch.

Choosing The Wrong Device For Your Tank

The sort of septic tank float switches that is most appropriate for your individual requirements is influenced by a number of factors, one of which is the purpose of the switch. Seeking expert assistance in the selection of the proper float switch equipment for your septic tank is your best option for success. Septic professionals or technicians have a more in-depth grasp of the components of a septic system. These specialists will often advocate some float changes over others based on their experience.

Septic tank float switches are critical components in septic systems because they help to maintain optimal operating conditions.

More crucial, though, is the requirement for something to operate at peak performance.

Top Quality Float Switches and Water Tank Float Switches

Float switches are an essential component of your septic system; they control the operation of your septic pump and alert you when there is a problem, such as when the water level is too high. There are several distinct types of float switches, each of which performs a different function. We will go through this in more detail below. Alarms and pumps are controlled by control duty floats, which are not always directly connected to the pump in question. They are connected directly to the control panel, and the control panel has a relay that activates whatever functions are required.

  • To summarize the action, the float rises, closing contacts close and this in turn activates the relay switch, which enables and takes on the load of whatever was previously switched on and off.
  • The float switch is responsible for channeling the electrical charge that drives the pump.
  • Pump floats are available in a variety of sizes.
  • The old pump on the system would have drawn more amps as a result of its age; when pumps age, they begin to draw more amps, which is ultimately what causes them to break down.
  • When added to an electrical circuit, float switches enable the sensing of fluid levels on their own without any external assistance from the circuit designer.
  • A closed circuit is one in which electricity is able to travel through the circuit’s components and provide power to the devices in the circuit.
  • Float switches are activated when fluid levels rise in conjunction with the rise in water level.
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The upward orientation of a float switch will normally lead it to shut, although the direction in which a float switch closes will vary depending on the exact float switch being used.

The natural position of a float switch is in the position when it is hanging down.

When the fluid level in a septic system reaches a specific level, the system will normally close a circuit and activate a pump.

The typical position of a normally openfloat switch will cause a circuit to be opened while the switch is in the open position.

When the water level in the system is high, a usually open system will become a closed circuit.

When an excessive amount of effluent accumulates in the tank, a standard septic system will attempt to pump it out.

The closed circuit will activate the effluent pump, which will then raise the wastewater to the desired level once again.

When the fluid level is low, current will flow; when the fluid level is high, current will not flow.

It is possible to utilize this system when the user requires the fluid level in a system to be higher than a specified minimum height.

Mercury is the first sort of mechanism to be discussed.

Unlike the first sort of mechanism, the second type is more mechanical in character.

The ball will roll within the float switch as the level of the fluid changes within the switch.

Float switches are also available in two different configurations: wide angle and narrow angle.

Float switches of this sort can be utilized in situations where a moderate degree of variation in fluid level is acceptable or to be expected.

These sorts of float switches should be considered if the user wishes to keep a more steady fluid level throughout the process.

When the float switch is closed, the effluent pump will begin to circulate the water.

In this way, the level of effluent in your tank can be controlled without the need for the user to look inside of the tank to determine if the pump should be engaged.

It is possible that an effluent pump will fail, causing the level of wastewater in your tank to grow over permitted limits.

A faulty pump, on the other hand, will not empty your tank.

It is possible for the float switch to become stuck in the on position due to a steady current.

This is due to the fact that the float switch has been destroyed and is still instructing the pump to empty a tank that is already empty.

When you purchase a new effluent pump, it is recommended that you replace the float switch to ensure that your system continues to operate properly for a longer period of time.

Float switches that are used in conjunction with a timer may be present.

To adjust the fluid level, an array of float switches, with an override switch, and an alert may be used in some systems. When installing a septic system, it is critical to understand the amount and types of float switches that will be required.

  • Float switches are used to control the operation of various devices dependent on the amount of fluid in the tank. Determine if a typically open or normally closed float switch is required. Be sure to determine if you want a wide angle or small angle floating switch. When you replace your effluent pump, you should also replace the float switch.

How to Check Your Septic Panel and Pump Chamber

It is recommended that you inspect your pump chamber once a year to ensure that everything is in proper working order. Follow the 11-step procedure outlined below to complete this task on your own! (Do you require further assistance? Alternatively, you may watch our instructional video below.)

‍ 1. Let’s start by inspecting the panel. Make sure the power is on by verifying the power switch to the panel is on.

The following items should be included in this general overview: The electrical box may be seen in the lower left corner of the image below, starting at the bottom of the image. Check to verify that all of the cables are firmly connected before using it. Next, take a look at the lower right corner of the shot, where you can see the discharge pipe for the pump. Check to see if it is operational (valve should be lined up with pipe). It’s now time to have some fun!

‍ FIRST.PUT ON GLOVES!That is one step you DO NOT want to miss. Remove the float tree (the pipe with a pvc handle located upright left in our picture) and pull up the alarms.

*Please keep in mind that these instructions are for a 4-float system. Some systems contain only two or three floats.

If you don’t hear an alarm, this is cause for concern. Starting at the top, I will explain the floats and how to ensure each one is working.

NOTE: If your water supply is depleted, you may need to replenish it. Fill it up a little with water from a yard hose.

7. Continue testing.

Check that the pump is operating properly by flipping the second float from the bottom upside down and then turning it back around. With your other hand, turn the next float up (which would be the second from the top) upside down while still holding the first float. You should be able to hear the pump start up. As soon as you have confirmed that the pump is operational, just release these two floats. There’s one more float to go. The top float serves as an alert in case of high water. Turn it over down to see whether this is the case.

8. Now is the time to inspect the power cords.

Check to see that everything is securely tied to the float tree and not just hanging free. Zip ties can be used to reattach any stray cables.

9. Securely return the float tree to its holder and coil any dangling cords so that they are out of the water.

All septic tank float switches are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

Junior M-NavigatorMercury Activated Pump Switch

For use in emptying applications, this mercury-activated float pump switch features usually open contacts and is suited for use with mercury. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mercury Activated Pump Switch with 90 Degree Wide Angle
  • 13 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug
  • Pumps up to 1/2 horsepower at 120V and 1 horsepower at 240V are controlled
  • The pumping range may be adjusted from 6 to 36 inches. Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A401 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A413
13 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1/2 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 1 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Itis not legal to use mercury float switchesin the statesof Connecticut,Rhode Island, Maine,California, Vermont, Illinois,Minnesota, NewYork,Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

Do you want assistance in selecting a float switch? Alternatively, you may phone us toll free at 1-877-925-5132.

navigator seriesmechanical Pump Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 13 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug
  • 13 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug Pumps up to 1/2 horsepower at 120V and 1 horsepower at 240V can be controlled
  • The pumping range can be adjusted from 6 to 36 inches
  • The pump may be used in water and sewage applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A001 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A013
13 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1/2 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 1 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Order online at any time, or call our sales department toll-free at 1-877-925-5132 if you have any questions.

Alderon Big SwitchMechanicalPump fLoat Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 120/230VAC, 14/2 SJOW wire, no plug
  • 15 amps, 120/230VAC, 14/2 SJOW wire, no plug Controls Pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120 volts and 2 horsepower at 230 volts
  • Pumping range may be adjusted from 8 to 22 inches. Utilized in potable water and sewage treatment applications ULListed. Contacts that are built to last

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem7368 With 20 FOOT CordItem7061
15 AMP, 120/230VAC, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1.0 HP At 120V Controls Pumps Up To 2.0 HP At 230V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Septic Solutions® offers free same-day shipping on all float switches, which is a great value.

Alderon Big SwitchMechanicalPump fLoat SwitchWITH 10′ OR 20′ CORD AND PIGGYBACK PLUG

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections.

When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical Pump Switch with 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 120/230VAC, 14/2 SJOW wire, Piggyback Plug
  • Controls Pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120 volts
  • Pumping range may be adjusted from 8 to 22 inches. Utilized in potable water and sewage treatment applications ULListed. Contacts that are built to last

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem7300 With 20 FOOT CordItem7055
15 AMP, 120/230VAC, Piggyback PlugControls Pumps Up To 1.0 HP At 120V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Put your trust in the professionals with more than 20 years of expertise in the wastewater business.

navigator plus seriesmechanical Pump Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • 15 amps, 14/2 SJOW wire, 120VAC, with a Piggy-Back Plug
  • Controls pumps up to 1 horsepower at 120V
  • UL listed. Pumping range is adjustable from 6 to 36 inches
  • It may be used in both water and sewage applications. SST Pipe mount assembly is supplied, and it is UL Listed as well. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A102 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A114
15 AMP, 120VAC, with PlugControls Pumps Up To 3/4 HP At 120V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

We provide the greatest collection of septic goods on the internet, with over 700 different options.

a-navigator high ampmechanical Pump Switch

In order to facilitate the emptying of float pumps, this mechanical float pump switch features generally open connections. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • A mechanical pump switch with a 90-degree wide angle
  • A 25-amp, 12-2/SJOW wire, 120V/240V, and a 10-foot chord
  • Pumps up to 1-1/2 horsepower at 120V and 3 horsepower at 240V are controlled. Pumping range may be adjusted from 8 to 28 inches. Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved
See also:  When Does A Septic Tank Need To Be Emptied? (Question)
Availability: IN STOCKItem20A301
25 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugControls Pumps Up To 1-1/2 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 3 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

SEptic Solutions® offers fast and free shipping on all of their float switches.

Alderon Qwik Pak High AmpMechanical FLoat Switch

The Alderon Qwik Pak High Amp mechanical float switch system is comprised of a junction box with a smart relay and a mechanical float switch system. The float switch communicates with the smart relay, which controls the pump’s on and off states, resulting in a longer float switch life. Used in conjunction with Grinder Pumps and other high-horsepower submersible pumps. Specifications of the product

  • Switches pumps up to 25 amps or 3 horsepower at 240V
  • Breaks BOTH lines while operating at 240V
  • Is safe to use with grinder pumps
  • 90 degree wide angle mechanical pump switch Pump is activated by a smart relay, which increases the life of the float switch. Pumping range is adjustable from 8 to 22 inches
  • Includes 5″x2″x2″ NEMA 4X Junction Box
  • Includes Quick Connect Wire Connectors – No Tools Required
  • Includes all necessary Junction Box Cord Connectors
  • Includes all necessary Junction Box Cord Connectors Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • UL Approved. CSA Approved, Three-Year Limited Warranty
Availability: IN STOCKItem7803
Click To View Larger Image FOR USE WITH GRINDER PUMPS ANDOTHER HIGH HORSE POWER PUMPS25 AMP, 240V,4X Junction BoxControls Pumps Up To 3 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Qwik Pak Specifications

In addition, floats are available in a variety of various lengths of cable. For further information, please contact us.

double M-NavigatorMechanicalPump Switch

For use in emptying applications, this mechanically operated dual float pump switch includes usually open contacts with normally closed contacts. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Dual float switches, as opposed to a single float switch, provide a more versatile pumping range. Specifications of the product

  • For use in emptying applications, this mechanically actuated twin float pump switch features usually open contacts and is meant to be mechanically operated. Activation of the switch to “ON” occurs when the switch is lifted. Dual float switches, as opposed to a single float switch, provide a more versatile range of pumping operation. Details about the product

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

120V with plugItem20A505 240V with plugItem20A506
15 AMP, 120V or 240V, with PlugControls Pumps Up To 1 HP At 120VControls Pumps Up To 2 HP At 240V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Dual Floats Allow More Flexible Pumping RangeAdjustable Pumping Range From 2 to 54 inches A Built-In Relay Allows these floats to work in conjunction with one another without the needfor a control panel

Put your trust in the professionals with more than 20 years of expertise in the wastewater business.

v-navigator verticalmechanical Pump Switch

This mechanical float pump switch with usually open contacts is ideal for emptying applications and is made of stainless steel. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Due to the fact that this switch only requires vertical movement to operate, it may be fitted in confined locations. Specifications of the product

  • Vertical mechanical pump switch
  • 10 amps, 120 volts, 16/2 SJOW wire, 10 foot cord with plug
  • Controls a vertical mechanical pump. Pumps up to 1/2 horsepower at 120 volts. This product is intended for use in tight spaces. The pumping range may be adjusted from 1 to 6 inches. To be used in water and sewage treatment applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem20A201
15 AMP, 120VAC, with PlugControls Pumps Up To 3/4 HP At 120V Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Do you want assistance in selecting a float switch? Alternatively, you may phone us toll free at 1-877-925-5132. All septic tank float switches are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

m-pilot seriesMercurycontrol switch

It features typically open connections and is intended for use with a mercury actuated float control switch to provide high level notifications. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • For use with a control panel or a high water alarm, this 10 degree narrow angle mercury activated control switch has an 18/2 SJOW wire and operates at 120/240V with no plug. It is suitable for use in water and sewage applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A701 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A709
5 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position Itis not legal to use mercury float switchesin the statesof Connecticut,Rhode Island, Maine,California, Vermont, Illinois,Minnesota, NewYork,Louisiana, New Hampshire, and Massachusetts.

Do you require assistance? Please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132 for professional assistance.

pilot seriesMechanicalcontrol switch

Normal open contacts are used in this mechanical float control switch, which is intended to provide high level notifications. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • For use with a control panel or high water alarm, this 10 degree narrow angle mechanically activated control switch has a 5 amp rating on 16/2 SJOW wire and operates on 120/240V with no plug. It is suitable for water and sewage applications. Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem20A601 With 20 FOOT CordItem20A609
5 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

Order online at any time, or give us a call at 1-877-925-5132 to place an order over the phone at your convenience.

ALDERON UNIMAX MECHANICAL FLOATcontrol Switch

The Unimax mechanical float control switch features typically open contacts that are intended to be used for high level alerts or to activate a control panel to empty a tank when the switch is in the open position. When the switch is in the elevated position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical control switch with a 10 degree narrow angle
  • 4 amps, 18/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V
  • For use with a control panel or high water alarm
  • Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved

Availability: AVAILABLE IN STOCK

with 10 FooT CordItem7202 With 20 FOOT CordItem7221
4 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The Raised Position

All septic tank float switches are shipped out the same day, free of charge.

pilot seriesMechanicalcontrol switch

Normal open contacts are used in this mechanical float control switch, which is intended to be used for low level alerts. When the switch is in the lowered position, it is triggered to the “ON” position. Specifications of the product

  • Mechanical control switch with a 10 degree narrow angle
  • 5 amps, 16/2 SJOW wire, 120/240V, no plug
  • For use with a control panel or high water alarm
  • Designed for use in water and sewage systems
  • Included is the SST Pipe Mount Assembly. UL Approved. CSA Approved
Availability: IN STOCKItem20A603
5 AMP, 120/240V, No PlugDesigned For Use With Control Panels and High Water Alarms Float Activates To ONIn The lowered Position

Put your trust in the professionals with more than 20 years of expertise in the wastewater business. “The good news is that you had a phone number that was easy to remember and a human voice to speak with! These days, it’s difficult to come by. Some businesses believe they are saving money by not including a phone number on their website or by making it difficult to find. They are incurring financial losses. Many individuals, like myself, prefer to locate products on the internet yet place orders over the phone.

SST FLOAT cLAMP ASSEMBLY

Clamp designed to mount any float switch to apipe.Also see the weights below.Availability: IN STOCKWhen Ordered With A Float SwitchItem60A404 SALE $7.95

Do you require assistance? Please contact us toll free at 1-877-925-5132 for professional assistance.

CableWeight for Float Switch Provides a pivot point for suspended floats

Weight with screws provided securely lock float cable intoplace.Availability: IN STOCKWhen Ordered With A Float SwitchItem60A400-WA SALE $9.50

Order online at any time, or give us a call at 1-877-925-5132 to place an order over the phone at your convenience.

How Do Float Switches Work (Diagram & Working Principle)

In the past, old float switches functioned by sending electrical signals to a low water level alarm by opening and closing dry contacts on the float switch’s contacts. They employed magnetic reed switches to ensure that the circuit was completed once the float reached its lowest position in the water, which it did (or when the storage tank is empty). Once the water level is restored to an appropriate level, the magnet would be disconnected, allowing the circuit to be re-established. Due to the limited number of operations available on these ancient float switches, they required to be replaced every three years or so, making them prohibitively expensive to maintain.

How New Float Switches Work

Float switches in the twenty-first century have advanced significantly in terms of the number of operations that your float switch can execute. Water Level Controls, for example, is a float switch maker that is redefining the way float switches are used for water level sensing in the process. In order to detect or (sense) water levels in a storage tank, the NEWFloat changes from Water Level Control work by employing probes (instead of floats) to do so (water, oil, gas, etc). The sensor probes truly function as their own sensors since no power is sent through them, which prevents them from being fouled, degrading, or decaying over time.

When one of the sensors detects a change in the water level, one of the six alarms is activated, depending on the sensor (High Alarm, Low Alarm, Fill Start, Fill Stop, etc).

A variety of alarms are used to control various start and stop systems. For example, if a low-water alarm is activated in a water storage tank, the warning might cause one of two things to happen (or both in some setups).

How Single PointMulti Point Switches Work

If you have a single point float switch, a low alarm sensor will cause an LED on your control board to flash red. In a multipoint float switch, a low alert may cause the LED light to illuminate and transmit a signal to activate an automated water pump, which would then replenish the water to the preprogrammed level. The procedure might also be taken even further by setting your automated pump to shut down whenever the water level reaches the Fill Stop probe, which is possible with a multi-point floating switch.

The device will emit a signal low alarm and automatically fill the water reservoir if the water level is too low, and a signal high alarm signal and automatically drain the water reservoir if the water level is too high.

Almost any storage tank that use float switches is capable of incorporating this technology, and should do so.

New Float Switch Working Principle

Float switches and water level controls are often set to be closed when they are first installed, indicating that there are no alarms to be activated since the water level is at the prescribed height. When the cooling tower begins to use the water for its industrial activities, the water level in the cooling tower begins to fall. At this time, there have been no alerts activated in the system. A conductive signal is transferred between the probes when the water level falls below the level of the probes, indicating that the low alarm should be activated.

Finally, after the water level has reached the preset level, the fill stop is activated, and the procedure is repeated from the beginning.

A common cause of float switch failures is fouling, degradation, or deterioration of the mechanism.

We can completely replace your float switches with our water level controls, which will never foul, decay, or degrade due to any changes in water quality.

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