Aerate Which Septic Side Tank? (Question)

  • Aerobic treatment for septic tank systems is an advanced process to treat wastewater. An aerator system for septic tanks is typically manufactured with a multiple-chambered tank with a number of stages. These stages consist of a tank which collects solid waste (referred to as the “trash tank”), an aeration chamber, and a settling tank.

Should both sides of septic tank be pumped?

Have your pumper pump both compartments of the septic tank. These are commonly called the “inlet” and “oulet” sides of the tank. While the inlet is absolutely necessary, the oulet is also good to have pumped.

Can I add an aerator to my septic tank?

The SepAerator® Septic Tank Aerator from Septic Solutions can be added to any existing septic tank to rejuvenate failing secondary treatment systems such as drainfields, mound systems, and sand filters. This system was designed by experts with over 25 year experience in the aerobic treatment industry.

How long should an aerator run in a septic tank?

The aerator should run 24/7 nonstop and should not cost more than 10 dollars a month to run. If you electric bill is high something else is causing it or the system is not correctly hooked up.

How do I know if my septic aerator is working?

The surest sign your aerator has failed is an overwhelming unpleasant odor coming from where your system discharges, whether into a secondary treatment system or directly into the environment.

Can you pump your septic tank too often?

If your septic tank is pumped too often, that bacteria will have no place to go but out into the drain field, which can lead to clogs and failures. So unless your septic tank’s sludge and scum levels reach certain thresholds, it’s actually beneficial to leave the septic tank alone.

Can you flush the toilet when the septic is being pumped?

You can save time and money by taking a few daily precautions that reduce the frequency of pump-outs your system will need: To flush or not to flush — Aside from wastewater, toilet paper is the only other thing that should be flushed.

Can a septic tank never be pumped?

What Are the Consequences of Not Pumping Your Tank? If the tank is not pumped, the solids will build up in the tank and the holding capacity of the tank will be diminished. Eventually, the solids will reach the pipe that feeds into the drain field, causing a clog. Waste water backing up into the house.

What size aerator do I need for a septic tank?

A typical septic aerator pump might run at 5 CFM or 80 LPM of air output. The typical range of septic air pumps for residential septic systems is about 2 to 8 cfm or from about 40 to 200 LPM of air.

Why do you aerate a septic tank?

Where the septic tank creates an environment with minimal free oxygen in the wastewater, the aeration system is designed to introduce oxygen into the wastewater so that the bacteria living within the system will be able to break down the waste solids more quickly and efficiently.

Can you have a septic tank without a leach field?

The waste from most septic tanks flows to a soakaway system or a drainage field. If your septic tank doesn’t have a drainage field or soakaway system, the waste water will instead flow through a sealed pipe and empty straight into a ditch or a local water course.

Can you convert a conventional septic to aerobic?

Simply converting from septic to aerobic treatment will not fix your drain field! There are systems available that can be installed in a septic tank to convert it to an aerobic treatment process. They typically consist of a small air compressor, some tubing and a diffuser that is placed in the septic tank.

How long does it take a septic aerator to work?

Most systems respond rather quickly, say within 4 weeks. The system will be fully functional during this period.

FAQs About Septic Tank Aerators

It’s possible that you’ve recently moved into a home that has an aeration system or an aerated septic tank, or that you’re looking to install a new ATU to repair your current septic system, that you’re looking for answers aboutseptic tank aerators. If this is the case, you’ve come to the right place. Depending on where you reside and what state you live in, an aerated septic system is referred to by a variety of various names: Aerobic Treatment Unit (ATU), aeration system, septic aerator, advanced onsite treatment unit, and other terms are used to describe these devices.

The septic tank aerator is sometimes the sole moving item in the whole system.

As a result, you want to make certain that it is constantly working smoothly and that it is regularly maintained.

  1. What is a septic tank aerator and how does it work? An aerator, also known as an air pump, is a device that forces air and oxygen into your septic system. When there is an increased amount of oxygen available to natural bacteria in the system, this improves the amount of treatment that can be provided for nutrients in the effluent. Air is drawn into the tank by an aerator system from the outside and pumped through the tank by a pipe network and diffuser that are located inside the tank. What are the advantages of installing a septic aerator? There are several advantages to this system, including the fact that it can be used in homes with smaller lots, inadequate soil conditions, in areas where the water table is too high, and in homes located near a surface water body that is sensitive to contamination by nutrients contained in wastewater effluent. ATUs should be maintained on a regular basis during their service life. How difficult is it to keep a septic tank aeration system running? As with any onsite septic system, you will need to pump your tank every 3-5 years, as is standard practice. Always be cautious of what you put into a tank that has an aeration system
  2. The Think at the Sinkbrochure from the EPA SepticSmart program is a fantastic resource for guidance. As the moving parts of your aerator near the end of their service life, you will need to repair or replace them as necessary. Always use authentic manufacturer certified components for any repairs, as aftermarket parts may invalidate any warranties and may not be able to withstand the stresses placed on your system as a whole. If your aerator is of a certain size, the ambient temperature in your location, whether or not your in-tank diffusers require cleaning, and how your pump is installed will all influence how long it will last. Which HIBLOW air pump do I need for my septic system and how many do I need? Please check with the manufacturer of your overall treatment system to confirm that the air pump is the proper size for your particular unit. Another advantage of using a professional service provider is that they can help you select which HIBLOW pump type you require. Where can I get repair kits for my air pump? We have a large number of distributors around North America that can offer you with both pumps and repair parts. Contact one of our distributors now. Please contact us via email or phone to find out which location is the nearest or most convenient for you. Make certain that the items you are utilizing are genuine factory approved parts. When you use aftermarket components, the performance of your air pump may be affected, and it may not be able to achieve the pressures necessary for your system

Contact HIBLOW for Septic Aerators!

The use of ourHIBLOW aerators by wastewater treatment facilities for both residences and businesses can assist to ensure that only treated water is discharged back into the environment. “ Thank you very much, Mike, for your outstanding customer service and for recommending a reputable distribution company. I wasn’t sure what I needed, but the HP-60 aeration pump, diffuser, and sinking air line that I received have exceeded my expectations. Perfect!” Please get in touch with us right away for additional details!

Restore Septic Drain Fields – Septic Tank Aerator System

Sewage treatment systems servicing homes and businesses are guaranteeing that only treated water is entering the environment with the assistance of ourHIBLOW aerators. “ Thank you very much, Mike, for your outstanding customer service and for recommending a reputable distributor for me. The HP-60 aeration pump with diffuser and sinking air line exceeded my expectations. I wasn’t sure what I wanted, but I’m happy with it. Perfect!” Contact us right now for further details!

What is Biomat?

In the secondary treatment system, a biomat is a layer of bacteria that develops in the soil throughout the treatment process. This biomat is extremely significant in the treatment of raw sewage that is often discharged from a septic tank or a cesspool. Septic tank output contains several minute waste particles and pathogens that must be processed before soil absorption can take place, and this is what this device is designed to do. A lack of this procedure allows improperly treated effluent to pollute groundwater, which can then end up in wells, streams, ponds, or even the surface of the earth itself.

Once the septic tank effluent is discharged to either a drain field or a seepage bed, the biomat that forms will efficiently reduce the waste particles and pathogens to an acceptable level before they can be transported further into the soils around the drainage field or seepage bed.

Septic tank effluent that has not been adequately treated should be regarded unsatisfactory and should be addressed promptly.

The Issues Caused By Biomat

During the course of time, the biomat grows in size, making it impossible for effluent discharged from the septic tank to pass through it, causing the effluent level inside the drain field trenches to rise, where it will be absorbed through the walls of the trenches as they develop. After a period of time, the sidewalls of these pits will begin to choke with accumulated debris. As soon as the bottom and sides of these trenches get blocked with biomat, the effluent will either begin to back up into the septic tank or surface in the yard above the drain field, depending on its location.

  1. If the effluent level in the septic tank rises by 4 inches as a result of the inability of the sewage to reach the absorption field, the effluent will begin to back up the entrance line.
  2. It is the intention of biomats to slow the flow of wastewater to the soils, giving the soils more time to filter out germs and viruses.
  3. It is therefore possible for the septic tank effluent to either back up into the residence or discharge to the ground surface, which will result in ponding of water.
  4. Septic systems that are failing due to biomat accumulation include, but are not limited to, water or sludge rising at the drain field, high water levels in the septic tank or distribution box, and sluggish running and gurgling drains and toilets, among other symptoms.

The SepAerator® Can Save Your System

Biomat is comprised of anaerobic bacteria and the waste formed by these anaerobic bacteria as a result of their digestion of the 70 to 80 percent organic matter released from a septic tank, respectively. In addition, when you convert your septic tank to the aerobic process with the SepAeratorTM, the septic tank transforms into a wastewater treatment plant, which will discharge around 95 percent pure and odorless water. It is only by eliminating this organic material waste from the effluent that you are able to completely eradicate the food supply that the biomat relies on to develop and live in the drain field.

  • To learn more about the SepAeratorTM, click here.
  • It is anticipated that the SepAeratorTM would introduce huge amounts of oxygen into the septic tank, which will result in the fast proliferation of aerobic bacteria within the tank.
  • Septic tanks are designed to process waste rather than releasing it into a drain field, seepage bed, sand filter, mound system, cesspool, or any other form of secondary treatment system you may have.
  • As soon as the waste is treated within the septic tank and clean water is sent to the secondary treatment system, the biomat will lose its food supply and will die within a short period of time.
  • As a result of the clean effluent created by the SepAeratorTM being combined with high volumes of aerobic bacteria entering the secondary treatment system, the biomat will be destroyed, allowing the clean effluent to readily permeate back into the soils.

Because aerobic bacteria are extremely successful at decreasing disease-causing pathogens, the septic system has been completely rejuvenated and transformed.

SepAerator Value Package – Septic Tank Aerator

  • Biomat is comprised of anaerobic bacteria and the waste created by these anaerobic bacteria as a result of their digesting of the 70 to 80 percent organic matter released from septic tanks. With the help of the SepAeratorTM, you can convert your septic tank to an aerobic process, converting it into a wastewater treatment plant that discharges around 95 percent pure and odorless water. It is only by eliminating this organic material waste from the effluent that you are able to completely eradicate the food supply that the biomat relies on to develop and live in the drainage field. The anaerobic bacteria will starve and die, the current biomat will break down and dissolve, and no new biomat will grow in the future, making the SepAeratorTM a full and permanent solution to the biomat problem in your drain field. As soon as the SepAeratorTM is installed in an existing septic tank, the dynamics of how the septic tank operates are significantly altered. In the septic tank, the SepAeratorTM will introduce significant volumes of oxygen, which will promote the fast proliferation of aerobic bacteria within the tank. Bacteria that are aerobic in nature are far more effective in decomposing trash and will thrive in the environment created by the SepAeratorTM. Septic tanks are designed to process waste rather than releasing it into a drain field, seepage bed, sand filter, mound system, cesspool, or whatever form of secondary treatment system you may have installed. This product has been tested and proved to discharge about 95 percent clean and odorless water to the secondary treatment system when properly installed. As a result of waste being processed within the septic tank and clean water being discharged to the secondary treatment system, the biomat loses its food supply and will die within a short time period. Because biomat formation necessitates the presence of anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can grow without the presence of oxygen), a biomat that has been developing in the secondary treatment system for many years begins to disintegrate very fast once it is established. As a result of the clean effluent created by the SepAeratorTM being combined with huge volumes of aerobic bacteria entering the secondary treatment system, the biomat will be destroyed, allowing the clean effluent to readily permeate into the soils once more. As a result of the aerobic bacteria’s high efficiency in decreasing disease-causing pathogens, the septic system’s rejuvenation and transformation are completed.
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Applications for the SepAerator® Value Package

  • Biomat is made up of anaerobic bacteria and the waste created by these anaerobic bacteria while digesting the 70 to 80 percent organic matter released from a septic tank. When you use the SepAeratorTM to convert your septic tank to the aerobic process, the septic tank transforms into a wastewater treatment plant that discharges around 95 percent clean, odorless water. You eliminate the food supply for the biomat in the drain field by eliminating this organic material waste from the effluent. Anaerobic bacteria will starve and die, the current biomat will break down and disintegrate, and no new biomat will grow in the future, resulting in a comprehensive and permanent solution to the biomat problem in your drain field. When the SepAeratorTM is installed in an existing septic tank, the dynamics of how a septic tank operates are significantly altered. The SepAeratorTM will inject enormous amounts of oxygen into the septic tank, causing aerobic bacteria to flourish and multiply fast within the tank. Bacteria that are aerobic in nature are far more effective in decomposing trash and will thrive in the conditions created by the SepAeratorTM. Rather of dumping raw sewage into a drain field, seepage bed, sand filter, mound system, cesspool, or whatever form of secondary treatment system you may have, the waste is handled within a septic tank. The SepAeratorTM has been tested and proved to release about 95 percent clean and odorless water to the secondary treatment system. It is important to note that when waste is treated within the septic tank and clean water is sent to a secondary treatment system, the biomat loses its food supply and will die very soon. Because biomat formation necessitates the presence of anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that can grow without the presence of oxygen), a biomat that has been developing in the secondary treatment system for many years begins to disintegrate very fast. As a result of the clean effluent created by the SepAeratorTM being combined with huge volumes of aerobic bacteria entering the secondary treatment system, the biomat will vanish, allowing the clean effluent to readily permeate into the soils once more. As a result of the aerobic bacteria’s high efficiency in decreasing disease-causing pathogens, the septic system’s regeneration and transformation are complete.

Additional Detailed Information

  • The SepAerator® System and Its Operation
  • The SepAerator® Aerobic Process
  • The SepAerator® System and Its Operation The WonderfuserTM Diffuser Assembly is comprised of three parts: Decide on the most appropriate SepAerator® package for your application
  • SepAerator® Frequently Asked Questions
  • SepAerator® Sampling Results
  • SepAerator® Success Stories
  • Frequently Asked Questions about the SepAerator®

SEPAERATOR® VALUE PACKAGE DETAILS

The SepAeratorTM is equipped with only the highest-quality air pumps, which have been developed and tested to provide trouble-free operation for many years. A high-quality and high-performance septic air pump, the Hiblow air pumps have shown to be extremely reliable. The Hiblow air pump included in the SepAeratorTM Premium package has a flow rate of 3.7 cfm and is capable of treating up to 500 gallons of wastewater per day or a septic tank with a capacity of up to 2000 gallons. This air pump will need around $4 to $8 in electricity each month to run.

The diaphragms in the air pump have an average life span of 5 to 7 years on average.

Even if you elect to replace the diaphragms in your unit when they fail, a pump will last you around 10 to 12 years.

Patented Wonderfuser™ Assembly

No less than top-quality air pumps are used in the SepAeratorTM, and they have been developed and tested to provide years of trouble-free service. The Hiblow air pumps have shown to be high-quality and high-performance septic air pumps throughout the years of testing. The Hiblow air pump included in the SepAeratorTM Premium package has a flow rate of 3.7 cfm and is capable of treating up to 500 gallons of wastewater per day or a septic tank with a capacity of up to 2,000 gallons. The operation of this air pump will cost between $4 and $8 each month.

When used in an air pump, diaphragms have an average lifespan of 5–7 years.

The life expectancy of a pump is around 10 to 12 years if you elect to repair your device when the diaphragms wear out.

Heavy Duty Spa-Flex Airline

An extremely high grade material, which is both robust and flexible, is used to construct the spa-flex air line. Because of its adaptability, it can be installed in even the most challenging of situations. Simply screw the threaded brass adapter that is linked to the air line into the fitting located at the top of the diffuser to complete the installation. By lowering the diffuser into the tank and even swinging it over into place if necessary, the spa-flex may help you save time and money. Curve the line up through the aperture and out the side, then up and into the bottom of the housing, where the other end is connected to the air pump (see illustration).

If you wish to expand the reach of the pump to a more remote place, this spa-flex may be bonded to 12 schedule 40 pvc pipe. As a result of its great toughness and durability, it will continue to transfer air from the pump to the diffuser without issue for many years to come.

Installation and Maintenance Manual

Each SepAeratorTM kit includes a comprehensive Owners’ handbook that has all of the information needed to not only simply install the SepAeratorTM but also lots of information on how to use it properly after it has been installed. You will receive an abundance of information when you purchase a SepAeratorTM along with all of the technical help you may require to answer any and all of your questions both before and after installation by calling 1-877-925-5132 after you make your purchase. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

HOW IT WORKS

When a stool is flushed in the home, the wastewater drains into a drainpipe that transports it underground to a septic tank, where it is treated. Essentially, the objective of a septic tank is to provide an environment for anaerobic bacteria (bacteria that flourish without oxygen) to break down waste over time. Having an entrance baffle as well as an exit baffle is important to prevent waste from entering the tank and float right over its top before discharging to a secondary treatment system, which is what happens in most homes (drain field, sand filter, mound system, drip system, cesspool, dry well, etc.).

It is common for the septic tank discharge to include 70 to 80 percent raw sewage to be discharged to the drain field, where the raw sewage is treated by passing through a build-up of a material known as biomat.

What is Biomat?

In the secondary treatment system, a biomat is a layer of bacteria that develops in the soil throughout the treatment process. This biomat is extremely significant in the treatment of raw sewage that is often discharged from a septic tank or a cesspool. Septic tank output contains several minute waste particles and pathogens that must be processed before soil absorption can take place, and this is what this device is designed to do. A lack of this procedure allows improperly treated effluent to pollute groundwater, which can then end up in wells, streams, ponds, or even the surface of the earth itself.

Once the septic tank effluent is discharged to either a drain field or a seepage bed, the biomat that forms will efficiently reduce the waste particles and pathogens to an acceptable level before they can be transported further into the soils around the drainage field or seepage bed.

The Issues Caused By Biomat

During the course of time, the biomat grows in size, making it impossible for effluent discharged from the septic tank to pass through it, causing the effluent level inside the drain field trenches to rise, where it will be absorbed through the walls of the trenches as they develop. After a period of time, the sidewalls of these pits will begin to choke with accumulated debris. As soon as the bottom and sides of these trenches get blocked with biomat, the effluent will either begin to back up into the septic tank or surface in the yard above the drain field, depending on its location.

  • If the effluent level in the septic tank rises by 4 inches as a result of the inability of the sewage to reach the absorption field, the effluent will begin to back up the entrance line.
  • It is the intention of biomats to slow the flow of wastewater to the soils, giving the soils more time to filter out germs and viruses.
  • It is therefore possible for the septic tank effluent to either back up into the residence or discharge to the ground surface, which will result in ponding of water.
  • Septic systems that are failing due to biomat accumulation include, but are not limited to, water or sludge rising at the drain field, high water levels in the septic tank or distribution box, and sluggish running and gurgling drains and toilets, among other symptoms.

The SepAeratorTM is intended to reverse these symptoms; for more information, see the section below.

How The SepAerator® Can Save Your System

Biomat is comprised of anaerobic bacteria and the waste formed by these anaerobic bacteria as a result of their digestion of the 70 to 80 percent organic matter released from a septic tank, respectively. When you use the SepAerator® to convert your septic tank to the aerobic process, the septic tank transforms into a wastewater treatment plant that discharges around 95 percent pure, odorless water. It is only by eliminating this organic material waste from the effluent that you are able to completely eradicate the food supply that the biomat relies on to develop and live in the drain field.

  • To learn more about the SepAerator®, click here.
  • The SepAerator® will inject enormous volumes of oxygen into the septic tank, resulting in the fast proliferation of aerobic bacteria within the tank as a result of the introduction of oxygen.
  • Septic tanks are designed to process waste rather than releasing it into a drain field, seepage bed, sand filter, mound system, cesspool, or any other form of secondary treatment system you may have.
  • As soon as the waste is treated within the septic tank and clean water is sent to the secondary treatment system, the biomat will lose its food supply and will die within a short period of time.
  • As a result of the clean effluent created by the SepAerator® being combined with high volumes of aerobic bacteria entering the secondary treatment system, the biomat will be destroyed, allowing the clean effluent to readily permeate back into the soils.

SepAerator® Value Package Septic Tank Aerator Downloadable Documents

The procedure is not hindered by high temperatures at any point during the process. The aerator is equipped with a fan to keep it cool even in high temperatures. Aeration systems for septic systems are being erected all throughout North America, from Arizona to Alaska and Canada, where temperatures can drop below -40 degrees Fahrenheit and there is feet of snow cover during the winter.

Our septic aeration systems are not adversely affected by these harsh weather conditions.

Do I need any special tools to install one of your Septic Aeration Systems?

To do this project, you will need a garden shovel, a 5/8-inch drill bit and drill motor, and a small bottle of silicone caulk, assuming you have an outside outlet (power source).

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I hear a gurgling sound when I flush the toilet

When this happens, it indicates that the pipes are not draining correctly. A blockage in the pipe might occur either before or after the septic tank is installed. Remove the septic tank cover and check to see if the level in the tank is greater than the level in the baffle. If it is, the blockage is located there. The blockage might be anywhere between the home and the septic tank if this is not the case. A mature biomat that has to be removed using the Septic System Saver® aerator is most likely present if your septic tank level is high.

Will I have to touch or come in contact with sewage when I install one of your septic aeration systems?

In most cases, if the septic aerator is properly placed, you should not come into touch with any waste water. When you remove the clean out lid from the septic tank, you will notice a strong stench of septic waste.

Do I need to pump the tank before installing one of your septic aeration systems?

If you decide to place the product in your septic tank, we recommend that you pump the tank prior to installing the device.

Do I need to pump the tank out while one of your septic aeration systems is working?

You should not have to pump the septic tank any more frequently than you did before the septic aerator was installed in the tank. After around 30 percent of total tank content has been reached by solids, we recommend that you pump out your septic tank and replace it with new solids.

My septic pumper told me that I have a problem with septic water running back from my drain field. What does he mean?

It’s possible that he’s referring to two separate concerns. The vent pipe should be terminated at a height of at least 12 inches above the ground. Rainwater will not be able to enter the septic system through the vent system as a result of this. According to him, the other problem was that when pumping the septic tank, he noticed effluent leaking backward into the septic system from the drain field. A saturated drain field means that the septic effluent cannot be disbursed as quickly as it is received by the septic system, and this indicates that the drain field has become clogged.

This problem will be resolved by our septic aerator.

How do I know if my septic system is failing because of a clogged biomat?

The biomat in the great majority of septic systems becomes blocked, resulting in the system failing. Hire a pumper to inspect your system and establish whether any effluent is returning to the septic tank while the system is being pumped. Instruct them to estimate the amount of effluent that returned to the tank. If it is a tiny quantity, it is possible that a clogged pipe exists between the tank and the field. If there is a significant amount, there is a good possibility that the biomat is clogged.

How do I know if my septic system is failing?

In certain cases, you may notice effluent ponding on the surface of the ground, as well as smells from the septic system, gurgling pipes, sluggish flowing drains, or backups. When the system is being pumped, it is possible to encounter back flow from the field.

I have a septic odor in my back yard. Will your septic aerator fix this?

Yes, the Septic System Saver® aerator will completely eradicate the stink from the system. The presence of a septic odor in your yard indicates that wastewater has either reached the surface or is very close to the surface. A walk around the region of your yard where the septic system is installed is recommended. Look for spots where the grass is more lush or greener than the rest of the lawn.

If you come across an area like this, the most likely reason for it is the establishment of a clogged biomat. In the residence, an odor might be created by incorrectly vented waste pipes or sewage backing up into the drain traps, among other things.

Can I speed up the process?

In order to accelerate the restoration process, water consumption must be reduced, as well as the use of chemicals that are flushed down the toilet. Unless your behaviors are very harmful, you should not be required to change them! Simple actions like turning off the water while brushing your teeth, keeping a container of drinking water in the refrigerator, and spacing out laundry loads, among other things, should be done to ensure that your water fixtures are not leaking before they become a problem.

My septic pumper tells me I need to install a new field

Others have told us that local septic system suppliers have informed them that the only answer is to rebuild their drainage field. We have received several reports like this. Many tens of thousands of dollars are required to implement this solution. There is also the possibility that your whole drainage system may be condemned during the permission procedure for a new drainage bed and will have to be replaced with extremely expensive systems such as a mound system or a holding tank. This isn’t the case at all.

Will the Septic System Saver® septic aeration system work on all septic system types?

Using the Septic System Saver®, you may aerate any form of septic system, including conventional drain fields, mound drain fields, trenches drain fields, chambers drain fields, gravel and pipe drain fields, weeping beds, sand filters, drywells, seepage pit septic systems, and cesspools and lagoons.

How Aeration Systems Work

When it comes to sewage treatment systems for the home, there are two main types of designs to choose from: septic and aerobic. Both of these devices are used to begin the process of cleaning wastewater before it is sent to a secondary treatment facility. According to the characteristics of your property and the requirements of your family, anaerationsystem may be a far superior option.

How Anaerobic Septic Systems Work

An anaerobic environment is created in the septic tank (which implies that there is little or no oxygen dissolved in the water), in which heavier materials sink to the bottom and lighter fats and oils ascend to the top, with grey water floating between the two. This technique uses bacteria to break down solid waste slowly, allowing relatively “clean” grey water to pass into a drain field. This system is designed to hold wastewater in the septic tank for approximately 24 hours before it is released into the drain field, which is why excessive water use (such as doing all of the laundry for the family in one day) can overload the septic tank and have devastating consequences for your drain field.

HowAerationSystems Work

An anaerobic environment is created in the septic tank (which implies that there is little or no oxygen dissolved in the water), in which heavier materials sink to the bottom and lighter fats and oils rise to the top, with grey water floating between them. Bacteria work inside this system to progressively break down solid waste, allowing relatively “clean” grey water to seep into a drain field over time. This system is designed to hold wastewater in the septic tank for approximately 24 hours before it is discharged to the drain field.

A rather big area of cleared land is also required to accommodate the drain field, which is where the second step of water treatment takes place.

Advantages of an AerationSystem

Septic tanks provide an anaerobic environment (which means there is little, if any, oxygen dissolved in the water) in which heavier materials sink to the bottom and lighter fats, oils, and greases float to the top and grey water is suspended between them. As part of this system, bacteria breaks down solid waste, allowing comparatively “clean” grey water to pass into a drainage field. When you use a lot of water (for example, by doing all of your washing in one day), your septic tank might get overloaded and have disastrous consequences for your drain field, which can lead to a clogged septic tank and a clogged drain field.

Aeration Septic – The Top Five Items to Keep Out of Your Septic System

Septic tanks provide an anaerobic environment (which means there is little, if any, oxygen dissolved in the water) in which heavier materials sink to the bottom and lighter fats, oils, and greases float to the top while grey water is suspended between the two. Bacteria work inside this system to gently break down solid waste, allowing relatively “clean” grey water to pass into a drain field. This system is designed to hold wastewater in the septic tank for approximately 24 hours before it is released into the drain field, which is why excessive water use (such as doing all of the laundry for the family in one day) can overload the septic tank and have devastating effects on your drain field.

What is a septic system?

As previously stated, a septic system installed within a home serves as a waste disposal system, processing and eliminating wastewater generated within the residence. For those who have an anaerobic or aerobic septic system in their house, this implies that they are not reliant on the city or town’s sewage system to transport and treat their waste water. As with all other systems and components of the home, a septic tank system is composed of several moving parts and features, all of which must be properly maintained in order to perform at peak performance.

The most reliable approach to determine whether or not your septic system is completely operational is to hire the services of a septic tank inspector, who can (and will) supply you with a thorough septic tank inspection report following each visit to your property.

The more you understand about your system and how it should operate, the less likely it is that you will suffer difficulties such as braking, clogging, or backups into your house.

While there are a variety of items that might create problems when they are flushed down the toilet or placed through the trash disposal, some of the most prevalent are items that people do not think twice about flushing or putting through the garbage disposal.

Here’s a list of the top five things you should avoid introducing into your home’s septic system:

  • Coffee grounds: While coffee grounds are not flushed, they frequently make their way into a garbage disposal and, ultimately, into the septic tank. Because of their texture, bacteria have a tough time breaking them down, which can put your septic system in risk over time as they accumulate. One excellent comparison is to think of these grounds as if they were gravel, despite the fact that they are far smaller. In the long run, the number of coffee grounds that do not decompose will contribute to an increase in the amount of solids (or sludge) present in the system, which might cause it to malfunction. Strong disinfectants, such as bleach: Because a properly functioning septic system relies on beneficial bacteria to break down waste, introducing these sorts of chemicals into the system in excessive quantities can be detrimental to the system. The weekly cleanings and the introduction of these chemicals into the toilet bowl insert in tiny amounts per flush are both perfectly acceptable practices
  • Nevertheless, the use of excessive amounts is not encouraged. A decrease in the quantity of bacteria present in the holding and treatment tanks, which is a “living system,” might lead to an increase in the amount of solid waste accumulating in the system, which may necessitate more regular visits from a septic services specialist. Contrary to popular belief, condoms, disposable diapers, flushable wipes, and tampons are not as safe to flush as you may assume. Due to the fact that rubber does not degrade within the system, flushing condoms may put a septic system at risk of failure. Although the materials that are used to manufacture disposable diapers and tampons are termed biodegradable, this does not imply that they are beneficial to the general health of the system. However, while they will ultimately fail within the system, it may take a long time for them to do so, resulting in these objects remaining in the system for extended periods of time and causing further problems. Is it one of these other problems? These huge things have the potential to block pipes or become caught around the motor of a septic system, leading it to fail. A septic motor is a high-priced device that will normally cost upwards of $600 to repair or replace. Is taking this chance worth it? Grease and oil derived from the cooking process: Despite the fact that it may appear simple to simply drop these items down the drain while cleaning pots and pans, they may cause more harm than good. Although some oil and grease can unavoidably enter a septic system, an excessive amount of this will undoubtedly cause difficulties over time, especially in older homes with older septic systems. What is the explanation behind this? Over time, these materials have a tendency to harden and solidify, making it more difficult to break them down. The particles may also become attached to the sides of the pipes and walls of the septic tank, as well as to the moving mechanisms within it, causing backups, blockages, and overflow – or even a breakdown of the aerator or any other affected sections. Medications: Additionally, drugs have the potential to kill the bacteria that must be present in a septic system when they are flushed, and in some cases, they do so. This does not just apply to unused tablets
  • Liquid drugs should never be flushed down the toilet too. Many of these prescriptions contain high amounts of antibiotics, and when these pills are flushed down the toilet, the chemicals in these medications will disrupt the delicate balance that must exist in the tank. Another item to take into consideration? If there is a problem with your septic tank – such as an undiscovered leak – these chemicals will be released into the environment as well, and this is harmful.
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There are methods for disposing of all of these things that are not limited to the sink or toilet, and homeowners should consider taking advantage of these possibilities. Even if it means that garbage bags will fill up fast or that an empty jar will be required to collect grease, making these decisions will save you time, concern, and most likely a significant amount of money in the long run. Septic system maintenance is neither difficult nor prohibitively costly as long as you follow the instructions of septic service specialists.

For those who have not complied with suggestions and may have introduced items such as these into their system?

Don’t be scared to ask about the many septic system treatment alternatives accessible to folks who need to reintroduce healthy bacteria into their systems while also eliminating some of the known concerns.

Septic system failed – should I try installing an aeration unit?

In the previous couple of weeks, I’ve made significant strides forward in my circumstance. My leach field was around 95 percent obstructed, with very little, if any, movement in the water. I had already moved the graywater to another solution, which had been beneficial for a time, but the field began to fail gradually, eventually failing to the point of being virtually unusable. I have a single septic tank and wanted to experiment with aeration without incurring the expense of a second tank. I discovered a number of things that I haven’t seen openly stated on any of the boards, so I wanted to share them here in the hopes that it would be of use to someone else.

  • Too much air volume was introduced into the tank, and it was placed in the middle of the tank, causing excessive churning and sediments to escape the tank.
  • I was under the impression that it didn’t work for a number of months.
  • However, in the last couple of weeks, I’ve noticed that the water levels have really dropped to the point that they are STAYING at the edge of the output pipe!
  • I utilized the approaches outlined below to prevent having to replace my field without spending $1000 on a solution.
  • They must pass through the first baffle and separate in order for the lighter stuff to ascend and the heavier materials to descend through.
  • If you look about, you can find diaphragm diffusers for as little as $35 that can be attached to PVC pipe and activated by an air valve that supplies JUST ENOUGH air pressure/volume to activate the diaphragm (this is an air RELIEF valve, not a cutoff valve).
  • If you use too much, you’ll get a torrential downpour (which you don’t want).

Everything may happen away from where the tank is settling, which saves time and energy.

In addition, I received a 4 “On the output side, there was a TEE that acted as a divider.

You don’t want bubbles to rise into the TEE, since this might cause some debris to be drawn into the TEE.

When it comes to my solitary concrete tank, one idea I had from a local contractor was to empty it, climb inside, and create a cinderblock wall that would allow for two-thirds incoming/settling and one-third aeration.

There is a requirement for several hundred gallons of aeration space.

If you can find a method to open the other end of your leach lines in order to expand your field, even temporarily, you will be able to move this newly invigorated aerated bacteria through there more quickly, allowing it to begin to work sooner.

It is important to note that I did not need to purchase super duper amplified bacteria to add.

That’s analogous to purchasing weed seeds: if you give dirt enough rain, the weeds will appear.

My findings show that the low agitation treatments available for $500-$1000 that are already on the market would almost likely work. I just choose to experiment with a do-it-yourself option. I hope this is of use to someone.

What goes in must come out—what I’ve learned about my septic and aeration systems

In one of my earlier posts, written by Brian L, I discussed my recent purchase of a property in a semi-rural region after having spent the most of my life in the suburbs. I had always relied on city water and sewage and had never given much attention to where all of the water (and other waste) went after it was consumed by me and my family. Because the county where our house is located mandates a septic examination following a property transfer, we were able to determine exactly where the sewage was flowing.

  • This contaminated water then flowed via underground pipes, over a neighboring piece of land that we do not own, and gushed out close to the road.
  • We were informed that we need an aeration system.
  • Unfortunately, I did not get the opportunity to inquire as to why we required an aeration system.
  • We were experiencing financial difficulties at the time.
  • A sufficient amount of soil overlying the bedrock is not there to sufficiently filter the effluent.
  • In other words, we now have an aeration system, which, as the installer described to me, basically functions like a “small waste-water treatment plant.” That does sound like something that would be good to have in the yard, doesn’t it?
  • Unlike our previous system, an aeration system drains water out above ground rather than allowing water to seep into the ground under the surface.
  • This system has a septic tank, much like a traditional system, but it also includes a pump that continuously pumps air into the liquid in the tank.
  • This is how the system is able to function without the use of a leach bed.
  • The water that passes through the lift station is used to irrigate the lawn.

In reality, we pay to have it inspected annually (a county requirement), and aside from having the company performing the inspections fix any problems that may arise, all I have to do is have the solids pumped out of the tank on a regular basis (which any septic tank would require), and keep the chlorinator and dechlorinator topped off with water.

  1. However, there are a few aspects of the system that we do not appreciate.
  2. Because the sand filters are so large and could not be hidden, we built these massive concrete bunkers alongside the road to house them.
  3. In addition, there is a distinct odor in the yard near the system, which has been confirmed.
  4. In light of the fact that there is a pump pushing air into the system, it stands to reason that there is an equivalent quantity of air coming out as well, and that air has a distinct scent to it.
  5. And it should be noted that the pump is operational 24 hours a day.

And, perhaps, things will continue to be that way, considering that the well from which we obtain all of our water is only 100 feet away from the outflow pipe of this system. I’m fine with reusing our water as long as the water that comes out of the faucet is pure and pure.

How To Use A Septic Tank Aerator

When it comes to septic tanks, the SepAeratorTM is an innovative tool that has been created to alter the dynamic of how they function. Septic tanks are available in a number of sizes, and their primary function is to collect and decompose sediments and other diverse liquids that are discharged down the drain once they have been constructed. In order to prevent sediments from floating right across the top of the tank and into the secondary treatment system, such as field absorption, mounds, or almost any sort of secondary treatment system is installed in the septic tank.

Although the septic tank should prevent the bulk of particles from entering the secondary treatment system, the majority of septic tank discharges still contain roughly 70% raw sewage.

The difficulty with this procedure is that over time, the sewage can seal or clog the pores in the soil, resulting in a significant reduction in the soil’s ability to absorb water and nutrients.

proven effective for rejuvenating failing drain fields

In addition to being built, tested, and proven to minimize this clogging process, the SepAeratorTM will operate extremely well to revitalize a secondary treatment system that is currently in need of improvement. Although it appears to be too wonderful to be true, the technology underlying the SepAeratorTM is sound. Anaerobic wastewater breakdown is replaced by aerobic wastewater breakdown when the optimum quantity of oxygen is given to a septic tank and properly disseminated. Under these conditions, aerobic organisms will develop at a considerably faster rate and in far greater quantities than they would naturally.

Using a mix of fine air and coarse air diffusion, the SepAeratorTM will ensure that an appropriate quantity of oxygen is introduced into the tank.

Solids and sewage travel through the system as a result of aerobic bacteria, which is growing and thriving in this oxygenated environment, being able to readily attach itself to the solids and consume them extremely fast as they move through the system.

Compared to raw sewage, cleareffluent may be absorbed into soils considerably more readily.

Mother Nature will be able to do her tasks much more efficiently and successfully with the help of the SepAeratorTM.

installation in a single compartment tank

For the installation of a SepAeratorTM in a single compartment septic tank, the following components must be installed first. It is the SepAeratorTM Premium kit that comprises the airpump, diffuser assembly, Air Driven Particle Recirculator, and other other tiny pieces to complete the installation. However, they should be built above the outlet part of the tank to provide for servicing access to the Air Driven Particle Recirculator. Risers and lids are optional. Please keep in mind that the SepAeratorTM diffuser assembly should be fitted near to the input side of the tank and away from the discharging region.

In order for the risers to join to the tank, watertight adaptor rings must be placed to the top of the tank over each opening.

Septic tank filtering is required, especially on single compartment septic tanks, in order to prevent any particles that will continually be moving in the septic tank as a result of the operation of the SepAeratorTM from floating out of the tank and into the secondary treatment system (see Figure 1).

In case of low air pump pressure, the alarm will sound, verifying that the pump is running correctly.

On/off switch, reset button, 115V power outlet are all included in the control panel’s configuration.

Installation in a dual compartment tank

If you want to install a SepAeratorTM in a multi compartment septic tank or a tank with more than two compartments, you’ll need to put in the following items. In the SepAeratorTMPremium kit, you’ll get the air pump, diffuser assembly, housing, platform, Air DrivenParticle Recirculator, and a few other miscellaneous components. It is important to note that the SepAeratorTM diffuser assembly should not be put in the compartment where the discharge pipe is situated. A septic tank adapter ring should be fitted in order to give access to the Air Driven Particle Recirculator.

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